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Made in gb
Angry Chaos Agitator






Pure acetone will (and i have tried) strip paint, it will also eat through super glue and plastic, BUT

Will pure acetone affect my pewter Storm Troopers other than just eating away at the paint and glue? (i think its pewter anyway)

the reason i ask is because there paint job is simply horrific, i have 28 stormies to strip as well as most of a CCS in metal miniatures and they all need cleaning up

Remember when it comes to 40k Fluff
[Sing]

If you are wondering how he eats and breaths
And other science facts....

Just repeat to yourself; "It's just a show".
"I should really just relax".

[/Sing]

 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






No. Acetone (and other organic solvents) have no effect on metal of any kind, including the alloy used by GW (pewter or white metal are both acceptable terms for it).
   
Made in gb
Angry Chaos Agitator






thank you

Remember when it comes to 40k Fluff
[Sing]

If you are wondering how he eats and breaths
And other science facts....

Just repeat to yourself; "It's just a show".
"I should really just relax".

[/Sing]

 
   
Made in us
Infiltrating Hawwa'





Through the looking glass

Also a little tip, go and buy cheap acetone based finger nail polish. The cheaper the better. The really weak stuff is just potent enough to allow you to pull bases off figs instead of melting them off.

“Sometimes I can hear my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I'm not living.”

― Jonathan Safran Foer 
   
Made in us
Incorporating Wet-Blending





Houston, TX

Also be aware that acetone emits noxious fumes and is highly flammable.

-James
 
   
Made in ie
Stern Iron Priest with Thrall Bodyguard





Ireland

Another issue to watch out for with pure acetone is that it is an abortifacient. So do be careful where you put it.

It's not the size of the blade, it's how you use it.
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For all YMDC arguements remember: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vbd3E6tK2U

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Made in za
Been Around the Block




South of the Sun

Couple more tips, from one who's given mini's more acetone baths than he'd care to remember.

Get a large glass jar, like one of those beetroot bottles or something. Pour in your acetone, just buy it from the hardware store its not too pricey. Give the model an overnight bath after removing all plastic components from it. Swirl it around a bit, then really tuck into the model with an old toothbrush and always always use rubber gloves when working with this stuff, preferably outside. It is toxic.

Stuff does a great job on metal mini's. I've performed this operation hundreds of times over the years.

 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






Johnny Strange wrote:preferably outside. It is toxic.


Not nearly so toxic as people seem to think. The levels where protective equipment is required for industrial workers is quite high - very high in fact. The human body actually creates and metabolizes acetone of its own accord as part of the process of digesting fats. It is in our blood every day, and we pee out what we don't need (assuming you are not diabetic or have some other disorder which hinders your metabolization of ketones).

A study back in 2003 of Chicago area nail salons found that when work was being performed using various organic solvents (the primary one for their work being acetone) that the peak levels measured were 13,000 ppb (not a typo - part per billion). This involved no direct ventilation and a recirculating air system. Exposure levels of 500 ppm do not have any significant impact on a normal healthy adult. That is 50 times higher than what you would find if you spent 8 hours a day hunched over some rich lady from the Northside of Chicago stripping nail polish off her fingers.

Gloves are a good idea though. It wouldn't hurt you to go outside - or at least open a window...but then again, it really wouldn't hurt you much to not do that. It will burn. KEEP OUT OF YOUR EYES though. While it is a mild irritant for direct contact on your skin, or inhaled vapors - it can cause blindness if you get a splash in the face. Safety glasses when doing transfers and no splashing if you are not wearing safety glasses while cleaning the miniatures.
   
Made in gb
Angry Chaos Agitator






liturgies of blood wrote:Another issue to watch out for with pure acetone is that it is an abortifacient. So do be careful where you put it.


Well, currently i have no misses (a fancy, but understanding chaos is easier than THAT situation -sigh- ), sister doesn't go in or near the shed (she complains that 22'c is pneumonia weather! before going and hiding under a blanket), and mum has her own shed.

jmurph wrote:Also be aware that acetone emits noxious fumes and is highly flammable.


As for the metal minis, I've put it in an old clean pan (which lacks a handle) in a well vented area safe from moister, hair, dust, rodents and felines of a curious nature, with a glass lid to prevent any unnecessary contaminates, it came with the pan which since it let enough air out when cooking im presuming it will let any excess fumes out while "cooking" the minis in there overnight (acid?) bath.

Necroshea wrote:Also a little tip, go and buy cheap acetone based finger nail polish. The cheaper the better. The really weak stuff is just potent enough to allow you to pull bases off figs instead of melting them off.


I popped into town and got my self 4x300ml bottles for £4, okay i got ripped off a bit but still far cheaper than the local hardware store (i checked as i walked into town) at a 2:1 ratio acetone:water, i wasn't to keen on using it raw so after a little research water works fine for diluting and its still far stronger than nail varnish remover, it just makes it cloudy (i watched as the paint on my enginseer was quickly flaking off as i was walking up the path with it)

Sean_OBrien wrote:
Johnny Strange wrote:preferably outside. It is toxic.


Not nearly so toxic as people seem to think. The levels where protective equipment is required for industrial workers is quite high - very high in fact. The human body actually creates and metabolizes acetone of its own accord as part of the process of digesting fats. It is in our blood every day, and we pee out what we don't need (assuming you are not diabetic or have some other disorder which hinders your metabolization of ketones).

A study back in 2003 of Chicago area nail salons found that when work was being performed using various organic solvents (the primary one for their work being acetone) that the peak levels measured were 13,000 ppb (not a typo - part per billion). This involved no direct ventilation and a recirculating air system. Exposure levels of 500 ppm do not have any significant impact on a normal healthy adult. That is 50 times higher than what you would find if you spent 8 hours a day hunched over some rich lady from the Northside of Chicago stripping nail polish off her fingers.

Gloves are a good idea though. It wouldn't hurt you to go outside - or at least open a window...but then again, it really wouldn't hurt you much to not do that. It will burn. KEEP OUT OF YOUR EYES though. While it is a mild irritant for direct contact on your skin, or inhaled vapors - it can cause blindness if you get a splash in the face. Safety glasses when doing transfers and no splashing if you are not wearing safety glasses while cleaning the miniatures.


I honestly didn't realise it was a natural produce or even one we produce our selves so thank you, as for scrubbing them outside? not a problem, and if the stuff is irreclaimable after the washing tomorrow... well lets just say i have a few evergreens and an incinerator which will be (un-)willing to be acquainted

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 2012/07/31 15:42:27


Remember when it comes to 40k Fluff
[Sing]

If you are wondering how he eats and breaths
And other science facts....

Just repeat to yourself; "It's just a show".
"I should really just relax".

[/Sing]

 
   
Made in us
Grizzled Space Wolves Great Wolf





Sean_OBrien wrote:
Johnny Strange wrote:preferably outside. It is toxic.


Not nearly so toxic as people seem to think. The levels where protective equipment is required for industrial workers is quite high - very high in fact. The human body actually creates and metabolizes acetone of its own accord as part of the process of digesting fats. It is in our blood every day, and we pee out what we don't need (assuming you are not diabetic or have some other disorder which hinders your metabolization of ketones).

A study back in 2003 of Chicago area nail salons found that when work was being performed using various organic solvents (the primary one for their work being acetone) that the peak levels measured were 13,000 ppb (not a typo - part per billion). This involved no direct ventilation and a recirculating air system. Exposure levels of 500 ppm do not have any significant impact on a normal healthy adult. That is 50 times higher than what you would find if you spent 8 hours a day hunched over some rich lady from the Northside of Chicago stripping nail polish off her fingers.

Gloves are a good idea though. It wouldn't hurt you to go outside - or at least open a window...but then again, it really wouldn't hurt you much to not do that. It will burn. KEEP OUT OF YOUR EYES though. While it is a mild irritant for direct contact on your skin, or inhaled vapors - it can cause blindness if you get a splash in the face. Safety glasses when doing transfers and no splashing if you are not wearing safety glasses while cleaning the miniatures.
I've not used acetone for stripping miniatures myself but we used to buy big 55 gallon drums of it for various tasks on the race team I was at and if I directly breathed the fumes I'd start coughing and struggle to breathe for a few minutes, and you could feel the fumes burning your eyes if the fumes were really concentrated (probably because it evaporates so quickly). Not the most evil thing in the workshop by a long shot, but still when we were using it I'd try and keep the fumes away from me as much as possible and always used it in the breezeway rather than the workshop itself. I'd often clean my hands in it to get resin off, but would limit my exposure if using it for cleaning other things by wearing gloves as it would irritate the skin and dry it out.

I read the report online saying acetone shouldn't cause issues with inhalation except at high concentrations, but what can I say, I've breathed it in and started coughing so clearly it had an affect on me.

I think with any chemicals the safe bet is read the warnings and keep exposure to a minimum.
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






AllSeeingSkink wrote:I read the report online saying acetone shouldn't cause issues with inhalation except at high concentrations, but what can I say, I've breathed it in and started coughing so clearly it had an affect on me.

I think with any chemicals the safe bet is read the warnings and keep exposure to a minimum.


Which is a lesson in vapor diffusion. Acetone has a low vapor pressure. If you keep a lot of it in a big container, the available air space will quickly reach a saturation level which is unusual (especially if you add heat and agitation). When you pop the top on a 55 gallon drum of acetone, the air at the top of the drum is fully saturated with acetone (as much as it can possibly hold). Because of the dynamic properties of gases - it quickly tries to reach a more balanced equilibrium and you get a nose full of it. The air which you are breathing right then and there is at a very, very high concentration of acetone (without knowing specifics - I couldn't hazard to guess the actual ppm level...but well over 10,000 ppm based on the books I have on hand).

The thing is though that if you were to take that 55 gallon drum and scale it down to 1 gallon (or more likely smaller)...provided the air space was also scaled down proportionately, the air in the sealed container would have that same high concentration. But, there is a lot less of it. You open the bottle and that air starts to move. When it expands to twice the volume, you have half as high a concentration. By the time it actually reaches your nose or eyes (assuming you are not right on top of the bottle - you are down to safe exposure levels).

I agree, you should minimize unnecessary risk - however a lot of the worry which exists is unwarranted. Industrial application and volumes which you mention will not happen for your average person who picks up a can of acetone to strip some miniatures, even if they were to dump the entire can on the floor (as demonstrated by acetone being a common wax remover used for floor refinishing).
   
Made in us
Grizzled Space Wolves Great Wolf





I know what you're talking about with concentrations, but that wasn't the case. It was a 55 gallon drum with a tap at the bottom, so we rarely actually opened it from the top, we'd just turn the tap on and fill a smaller container which we'd then use, or when I would wash my hands I'd just open the tap and stick my hands under it to wash them.

The main purpose we used it for was cleaning for composites work, and my lungs/throat never liked it when I used it.

But yeah, it's not that dangerous... after all I'd use it to wash the resin off my bare hands but I was just pointing out that even though I read that report saying there was little danger from inhalation, my lungs disagree
   
 
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