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Made in us
Bounding Dark Angels Assault Marine






I just recently started to pay attention to Infinity. With GW products I feel like the metal models are flimsy and sub par to work with. How are the infinity models to paint and handle?
   
Made in au
Anti-Armour Swiss Guard






Newcastle, OZ

If you are used to plastic models, there will be an adjustment period and a learning curve to them.

They are slimmer than GW's bobble-headed ham-fisted models (srsly, GW's heads and hands are out of scale to their bodies).

But to answer your post title question ...

No, there aren't any infinity plastic models. There aren't likely to be any, either. Corvus Belli do their casting in-house and there aren't any plastic manufacturers in Spain. To do plastics, means outsourcing that job - and they are one of few employers in their region experiencing growth. To outsource would actually hurt their local economy more than to not make plastics.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2016/12/15 21:32:51


I'm 49.
Old enough to know better, young enough to not give a ****.


 
   
Made in gb
Combat Jumping Tiger Soldier




North Wales

A few months ago, when CB were spitballing a few possible ideas, one of the things that came up was the Aristea spin off game - sort of gladiatorial combat in the Infinity universe.

At a seminar, Gutier did mention the possibility of plastics for that, but as far as Infinity itself goes, learn to love the metal!
   
Made in us
Bounding Dark Angels Assault Marine






Bah, I like everything about the game but that. The great models, good rule mechanics, terrain and play mat to boot. This is a literal game in a box.
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut




While I love plastic far more then crappy metal, this is going to be metal forever. The sculpts are some of the best there is, but its always going to be preference. My recommendation is use Loctite super glue and score the connecting joints. They should keep for a while.
   
Made in au
Anti-Armour Swiss Guard






Newcastle, OZ

I prefer metals for mandollies.

Whilst plastic CAN mimic the finer details of metal casting, they tend to be more fragile when they do so (which means Infinity would probably end up with hamfisted bobbleheads like a certain other company that does plastic gaming pieces).

I'm 49.
Old enough to know better, young enough to not give a ****.


 
   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

I am a complete metal miniature newb. I've also only been working with miniatures for one year now and started exclusively with GW products. I absolutely LOVE the Infinity models so was eager to switch over.

From a learning perspective, the Infinity line is harsh. If you have zero experience with miniatures, this would be a difficult way to get introduced for a few reasons.

With GW you use plastic glue which is very easy to work with. The plastic sticks together easily and you have some time to mess with it and move things around before it sets. MUCH easier than with metal miniatures which you use CA glue with and can easily stick your fingers together with. You CAN use things like Green Stuff to "glue the stuff together and add CA to it, but you would be holding things together for awhile. With plastic miniatures, you don't ahve to worry much about pinning either. It is almost a mandatory skill to learn with Metal Miniatures.

Metal is also a whole different animal than plastic in the miniature world. It requires a lot of sanding and something the parts don't fit together very neatly, so if you want a smooth looking model, you need to learn how to fill gaps with Green Stuff or a variety of other fillers.

The other thing about Infinity models is that there are no instructions on how they need to go together. There are also not very good pics that really show where some of the parts go.

I know what I'm posting sounds negative or discouraging, but you should know this going in. For people with no miniature building/painting experience, I would suggest trying your hand with GW first.

I posted something similar to this on the Official Infinity Forums as I think the company can do a lot to help the new hobbyist grow.

I heard someone say that Infinity miniatures are the true "Hobbyist's" line and I have to agree with that statement. I love them so far. I've built over a dozen so far and love the challenges and getting them built just right. Soon I'll be base coating and painting them, and I can't wait!

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2017/03/08 15:51:41


 
   
Made in au
Norn Queen






SuperNewb wrote:
With GW you use plastic glue which is very easy to work with. The plastic sticks together easily and you have some time to mess with it and move things around before it sets. MUCH easier than with metal miniatures which you use CA glue with and can easily stick your fingers together with. You CAN use things like Green Stuff to "glue the stuff together and add CA to it, but you would be holding things together for awhile. With plastic miniatures, you don't ahve to worry much about pinning either. It is almost a mandatory skill to learn with Metal Miniatures.


However, it is not a bond as plastic glue creates, where is fuses the parts together. CA glue just creates an adhesive layer between the parts. If you did it wrong and need to separate the parts, simply sliding a knife into the join and twisting it will pop the part off easily. Then just gently pry off the dried CA and start again.

CA is much more forgiving than plastic glue when it comes to correcting mistakes. Additionally, newer Infinity models have really well keyes joins. it's very, very hard to get them wrong - generally it'll be your own fault for doing something like clipping off the male plug of the keyed joint..

SuperNewb wrote:
Metal is also a whole different animal than plastic in the miniature world. It requires a lot of sanding and something the parts don't fit together very neatly, so if you want a smooth looking model, you need to learn how to fill gaps with Green Stuff or a variety of other fillers.


Outside of cleaning mold lines (which you do on plastics anyway), filing down where I have clipped feeding pipes (think along the lines of where you clip a model of a sprue, same idea) I haven't had any difficulties working with Infinity metals. They are, outside of very rare circumstances, and these are generally on their much older models, very well cast.

SuperNewb wrote:
The other thing about Infinity models is that there are no instructions on how they need to go together. There are also not very good pics that really show where some of the parts go.


You won't need them. A benefit of metal models is they're in fewer parts. Generally you're looking at - a solid body with legs, individual arms, sometimes an individual head. 3-4 parts is the norm. If you can figure out the left arm goes on the left side of the body, you're ahead of the game. Some models are more omplex - things like antennas, backpacks, etc. But these are all very easy to figure out where they go.

Coming from someone who has put together a LOT of 40k and Warhammer Fantasy plastics and resins (both Finecast and from Forgeworld), plus plastics from Wyrd, metals from Corvus Belli are a breeze to work with. With their recent advances in keying joins properly, they're some of the easiest models to build on the market (with some exceptions - Red Veils Tuareg sniper can go fething rot).

SuperNewb wrote:
I posted something similar to this on the Official Infinity Forums as I think the company can do a lot to help the new hobbyist grow.

I heard someone say that Infinity miniatures are the true "Hobbyist's" line and I have to agree with that statement. I love them so far. I've built over a dozen so far and love the challenges and getting them built just right. Soon I'll be base coating and painting them, and I can't wait!


Considering the incredibly massive growth of the company I think hobbyists are fine with their product.

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 2017/03/08 22:50:34


 
   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

I respectfully disagree with many of your statements Loki.

It seems like you have had a lot of experience with this, and as I mentioned, as someone having only been in the hobby for a year, I have a different perspective. My perspective is different, but not necessarily wrong.

I took the OP's statement as someone new. I believe my warnings are justified. I'm not hear to argue with anyone, but I found your assessment coming from a place with much more experience.

I've never had a plastic miniatures parts fall off after gluing. I also never had to score a plastic part to make sure it has a good bonding surface. I also never had to pin anything with plastic models.

I've built about 20 models in the last week, and had some parts just fall off. Also, I seriously take issue with how confident you are about parts fitting together so well. I can give you an example that on the recent Su Jian I just built the backpack didn't fit AT ALL. I had to file a bunch of areas down just to get the two tabs to touch. Then when I eventually got it glued together, the head of the model which was supposed to glue to the backpack wasn't even close to fitting properly. I eventually glued it together and used a BUNCH of green stuff to get all the gaps filled.

Another example is the Yan Huo HMC model. I've seen MANY complaints about the need to look at multiple pictures to figure out how the back pack and gun go together. If you can get those two to stay together without pinning them, more power to you.

As to your comment about how successful the company, that's amazing! I think it is well warranted, I but again, maybe they could bring even more people in if there were things that would make it easier for newbies to come into the fold.

Again, I'm not here to argue. Take my advice for what it is. I'm trying to help and answer someone's question. That's all.

   
Made in au
Norn Queen






SuperNewb wrote:
It seems like you have had a lot of experience with this, and as I mentioned, as someone having only been in the hobby for a year, I have a different perspective. My perspective is different, but not necessarily wrong.


I never said it was wrong - I was just giving my two cents on some of your statements.

SuperNewb wrote:
I've never had a plastic miniatures parts fall off after gluing. I also never had to score a plastic part to make sure it has a good bonding surface. I also never had to pin anything with plastic models.


I've had a total of three Infinity models fall apart. One, I dropped from a table. Two I mishandled rather roughly. All three situations would have seen a plastic miniature or similar proportions break as well - because I've done similar things to those.

SuperNewb wrote:
I've built about 20 models in the last week, and had some parts just fall off. Also, I seriously take issue with how confident you are about parts fitting together so well. I can give you an example that on the recent Su Jian I just built the backpack didn't fit AT ALL. I had to file a bunch of areas down just to get the two tabs to touch. Then when I eventually got it glued together, the head of the model which was supposed to glue to the backpack wasn't even close to fitting properly. I eventually glued it together and used a BUNCH of green stuff to get all the gaps filled.


I've built, as you can see in the showcase thread, almost 100 Haqqislam models. I've also built about 30 Tohaa and about 15 Yu Jing.

I've never had any model 'just fall apart'. If something broke, it's because I did something that would break it. I've also never pinned a model - including remotes, bikes and TAGs - and have never reinforced joins with green stuff. I have on occasion used and old trick called 'scoring', where you cut lines into the flat join areas to give the CA glue more to hold on to.

It's my overall opinion that if you use a good CA glue, and don't mistreat your miniatures, they won't fall apart. Also remember that while CA glue holds very quickly, it takes several hours to cure completely. If you start messing with the model before the CA glue is cured, it will break easier.

SuperNewb wrote:
Another example is the Yan Huo HMC model. I've seen MANY complaints about the need to look at multiple pictures to figure out how the back pack and gun go together. If you can get those two to stay together without pinning them, more power to you.


I never said every model is perfect - in fact I said that generally they're very easy to build. For example, the Tuareg sniper in Red Veil should be easy to build, and I gave up after 3 hours.

SuperNewb wrote:
As to your comment about how successful the company, that's amazing! I think it is well warranted, I but again, maybe they could bring even more people in if there were things that would make it easier for newbies to come into the fold.


They've said on numerous occasions they are very wary of expanding too fast. This is why they licensed out a lot of stuff. I'm sure they would have liked to develop the RPG in house (Infinity started as the personal RPG from some of the company founders), but gave that to Modiphius. I'm sure they'd like to try their hand at making their own official terrain like GW, but let partners do that.

Putting people on making build instructions might just not be something they think is worth expanding their company for.

By the way, there is actually build instructions for one model, but it kind of needs it.

SuperNewb wrote:
Again, I'm not here to argue. Take my advice for what it is. I'm trying to help and answer someone's question. That's all.


I'm not here to argue either. Discussion is good! As I said above, I was just giving my two cents.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2017/03/09 05:33:58


 
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut






St. Albans

I much prefer working with metal models, mostly due to the resilience of the material. I'd rather my models bent than snapped! Plus, gaming wise, I like a bit of weight to my models to keep them where they're meant to be.

I've got 3 full factions and have probably had slight issues with about 3 or 4 of the models - nothing that couldn't be sorted with liquid green stuff. I always dry fit the models first, score the connecting parts, and use Gorilla Glue superglue. That's not coming apart without some serious effort.

Some of the older sculpts can be a little tricky but the newer stuff goes together like a dream.

 
   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

 -Loki- wrote:


By the way, there is actually build instructions for one model, but it kind of needs it.



Whoa, that is cool!!

Maybe they should consider doing that for some of the other models, too.

Looking at some the of 3D rendered images they used to create the models online, it can't be that difficult to put out some instructions, I think. I'm familiar with CAD design and if they used that to create the models, they already have the build instructions. Why not just add to the website?

I also really like the 360 degree rotating vids on YouTube, but they are not close enough. I'd love it if they did what GW did with models on their website where you can explode them and rotate them.

Either one of those two things would be awesome.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Infiltrating Prowler





Portland, OR

SuperNewb wrote:
I've never had a plastic miniatures parts fall off after gluing. I also never had to score a plastic part to make sure it has a good bonding surface. I also never had to pin anything with plastic models.

I've built about 20 models in the last week, and had some parts just fall off. Also, I seriously take issue with how confident you are about parts fitting together so well. I can give you an example that on the recent Su Jian I just built the backpack didn't fit AT ALL. I had to file a bunch of areas down just to get the two tabs to touch. Then when I eventually got it glued together, the head of the model which was supposed to glue to the backpack wasn't even close to fitting properly. I eventually glued it together and used a BUNCH of green stuff to get all the gaps filled.

Another example is the Yan Huo HMC model. I've seen MANY complaints about the need to look at multiple pictures to figure out how the back pack and gun go together. If you can get those two to stay together without pinning them, more power to you.
Just to add another perspective...

will say there is a bit of a learning curve. I will also state in my experience despite having the same ingredients, not all super glues are the same. Specifically I went through five different super glue brands before settling on Gorilla Glue. Once I switched to that, I have never had any issues with any of my metal miniatures, including Infinity.

I also probably prep mine slightly different because I'm used to dealing with resin. After opening the package(s), I will clean any mold lines I see. Then I will dry fit everything, sometimes you'll find a piece that looks like it belongs but really is flash. I always check with images because sometimes what you think is flash, is actually a correct piece (I'm sorry little antennae, I didn't mean to cut you). Then everything gets a nice soapy bath and light cleaning with a toothbrush before rinsing and drying. When dry fitting if you see large gaps, then there might be an order pieces need to be added or you might have it at the wrong angle. I try spinning the piece because what you think is the correct angle isn't always the correct angle until you've shifted it a bit. That makes all the difference in making sure there are no gaps vs leaving a gap because it wasn't inserted and turned to the correct angle.

Once I've tested all the pieces then I start gluing and with gorilla glue, less is better. If you are use too much, it takes much longer to bond and seal. If you put glue on two pieces going together, it will take longer and require holding a bit longer. Otherwise it is a pin drop of glue, give it about 5-10 seconds air drying and then apply piece. I hold the pieces tight for 10-30 seconds and then set it on a foam/clip stand to fully dry. I usually am putting multiple miniatures together, so while one piece is drying I am working on another. I don't touch it until at least a good five minutes have gone by so I try to have enough to rotate through them so by the time I'm done with a set, I start back the beginning.

I have never had any of my pieces fall off my miniature after gluing it. I've also never had to score it to make sure it had a good bonding surface or had to pin any of my Infinity miniatures. Unless I've dealt with real old sculpts of Infinity miniatures, I've had no issues with gaps or had to use green stuff. I've unfortunately dropped them quite a few times between moving, painting, playing and children and have only had two miniatures have an arm break (both have been thin female miniatures) which were clean breaks that I just reglued without any issues.

 
   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

Hmmm, I've been using the Super Glue brand. The thicker one. Maybe that's part of the problem. I may need to switch to Guerrilla Glue.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Infiltrating Prowler





Portland, OR

SuperNewb wrote:
Hmmm, I've been using the Super Glue brand. The thicker one. Maybe that's part of the problem. I may need to switch to Guerrilla Glue.
I can at least verify, when I tried plain super glue from the store (walmart, michaels) that was my issue. I had tried Krazy Glue, Loctite, even Zap a Gap. It wasn't until I switched to Gorilla Super Glue that almost all my issues went away. I tend to use Loctite brush superglue to seal the edges of tokens, board/card terrain. I use plastic glue with plastics and resin/metals I use exclusively Gorilla Super Glue.

 
   
Made in au
Norn Queen






I'll be honest - I use super glue from my local supermarket. I tried dollar store glue which just didn't hold well. I used to like Zap a Gap but these days it seems to be expired before I even open it. Tried some other brands from hardware stores and such, and they've never worked well.

The brand that my local supermarket sells seems to hold really well. So yes, definitely experiment and find a brand you can readily buy that works. Not all superglue is made equal, and some expensive brands are worse than cheap brands.
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka







Loctite and more recently Gorilla, never had a joint break. Score and/or pin where you feel necessary. I've found Infinity miniatures a joy to assemble, a couple of tricky ones but mainly accurate, easy fitting joints.

   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

I just finished assembling the Shaolin Monks and wanted to throw them across the room, LOL. Those tiny heads are impossible to figure out.

Anyone who tells me they never have to fill any gaps up on these miniatures is a fibber. Sorry.
   
Made in us
Combat Jumping Ragik






Beyond the Beltway

Loctite gel and super gel work for me. It does seem to work better with a freshly opened container though. Once it has been opened for a while it is less effective. On the label, I write the date I opened the container. Saves me some head-aches.



 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka







Occasionally you're going to have to fill a joint, that goes for all companies and all materials, it's just part of the hobby. If you're having worse problems than that then there must be a reason. And I don't see why anyone would lie to you, what's to gain?

   
Made in au
Norn Queen






SuperNewb wrote:
Anyone who tells me they never have to fill any gaps up on these miniatures is a fibber. Sorry.


While I said I never reinforced joins with green stuff, I've absolutely had to fill some bad gaps. Particularly on old models - the legs on the old Maghariba were terrible for this.

I've also had to fill gaps on Wyrd plastics. And on GW plastic - the Carnifexes carapace is the Wurst for bad gaps. And on GW and FW resin. And on other companies resins.

Gaps between peices happen despite the creators best intentions. It's why stuff like liquid green stuff and Vallejo plastic putty were made.
   
Made in au
Anti-Armour Swiss Guard






Newcastle, OZ

SuperNewb wrote:
I just finished assembling the Shaolin Monks and wanted to throw them across the room, LOL. Those tiny heads are impossible to figure out.

Anyone who tells me they never have to fill any gaps up on these miniatures is a fibber. Sorry.


I've NEVER mentioned anything about not having to fill gaps (in CB's or any other maker's multi part models). It's part of the deal with building a multipart model whether it's a metal figure or kit, a plastic figure, a resin figure or kit or a run-of-the-mill injection moulded styrene model kit. It goes with the territory, and is just one of the skills that you should probably learn to do it. That the need is there is proven just by the existence of several kinds of model filler putty.

Just like soldering is a skill you pretty much NEED to learn if doing electronics, and pinning is a skill you may as well learn how to do if you assemble multiple part metal mandollies.

I don't have dainty little digits - and although some of the parts are quite small, I don't have difficulty assembling them.
Partly it's because I've been putting metal figures together for the better part of 30 years and learned a few things over that time, and partly it's because I have a set of tools that help with that assembly.

Pieces too small to pick up with fingers? Find some "dressings forceps" (long tweezers) - mine are about 5" long and enable me to pick up even the helmet antennae and apply them to the figure. Regular tweezers can work as well, but I like the longer style.
USE the right glue, and the right amount. This is a trial and error thing. With superglue, less is more. The "How much" to use is something you have to work out.

For positioning of separate heads on models, I generally use a small ball of greenstuff in the socket/on the stump. This is held to the model with a small drop of superglue. Another drop is put on the ball of GS when you are ready to position the head. The glue will grab the metal and the GS, but the GS flex allows you to position it easier until it sets/hardens.

I'm 49.
Old enough to know better, young enough to not give a ****.


 
   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

 Dark Severance wrote:


I've had no issues with gaps or had to use green stuff.


Just thought I'd leave this here.

You guys need to calm down, LOL.
   
Made in au
Norn Queen






SuperNewb wrote:
 Dark Severance wrote:


I've had no issues with gaps or had to use green stuff.


Just thought I'd leave this here.

You guys need to calm down, LOL.


When you say 'anyone who tells me', rather than directly respond to someone, in a thread where you've already been calling people out, is bound to cause misunderstanding.
   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

Giving my opinion is "already been calling people out"? LOL, like I said, people need to calm down.

This is an internet site about Miniature gaming. Good grief, stop talking yourselves so seriously!

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2017/03/12 02:55:37


 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka







I think everyone needs to calm down, including yourself, SN. Lets all be mindful of Rule 1 and self regulate before a moderator has to tell us to be good boys and girls.

The old "don't take your toy soldiers so seriously" line is played out and has been endlessly refuted. Lets not get into that discussion.

   
Made in us
Been Around the Block




South Jersey

 Casey's Law wrote:
I think everyone needs to calm down, including yourself, SN. Lets all be mindful of Rule 1 and self regulate before a moderator has to tell us to be good boys and girls.

The old "don't take your toy soldiers so seriously" line is played out and has been endlessly refuted. Lets not get into that discussion.


As someone brand new to this site, I have to say that I'm disappointed. It seems that people with 11 000 posts on this site aren't very open to someone else's opinion. Perhaps take someone's over all experience into account when replying to their comments?

The Infinity community is small. So getting into spats about "toy soldiers" doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense. Does it?

Maybe being new here, I don't know the rules. I'm not here to step on eggshells around people.

This message was edited 4 times. Last update was at 2017/03/12 14:30:06


 
   
Made in us
Thermo-Optical Tuareg






Nashville, TN

The more modern kits for Infinity go together VERY well. The fit is usually perfect and intuitive. A bit of dry fitting to find out where it goes and some super glue in the right spot and you should have a very tough model. I dropped my father knight from a bar-height table the other day with no breakage at all!

The older kits however suffer from all of the usual issues of metal kits. Coming from a primarily plastic game to those particular kits will be challenging.

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Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka







SuperNewb wrote:
 Casey's Law wrote:
I think everyone needs to calm down, including yourself, SN. Lets all be mindful of Rule 1 and self regulate before a moderator has to tell us to be good boys and girls.

The old "don't take your toy soldiers so seriously" line is played out and has been endlessly refuted. Lets not get into that discussion.
As someone brand new to this site, I have to say that I'm disappointed. It seems that people with 11 000 posts on this site aren't very open to someone else's opinion. Perhaps take someone's over all experience into account when replying to their comments?

The Infinity community is small. So getting into spats about "toy soldiers" doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense. Does it?

Maybe being new here, I don't know the rules. I'm not here to step on eggshells around people.
Maybe I missed something but I don't see anyone being particularly abrasive, we're all just sharing our opinions. This is why I suggested taking a breath and being mindful of rule 1, always a good thing to do if things are getting a little heated.

Putting myself in your shoes, I can see how you may have felt quite set upon? You stated your opinion and then a lot of seasoned forum members quickly piped up to state an opposite point of view, that could make anyone feel outnumbered. In actual fact what your probably seeing is just curiosity and confusion from people who find your opinion somewhat alien but just like you, no one is going to be stepping on eggshells for anyone else's benefit.

You'll find that not only do some people have positive experiences with metal but that there are large numbers of hobbyists who prefer it and even those who aren't interested in a miniature unless it's metal. So you can see why you're opinion might be jarring to many and they might challenge you on it, that's just life, no one is saying you're wrong, they're just saying they can't relate.

   
Made in us
The Conquerer






Waiting for my shill money from Spiral Arm Studios

Corvus Belli has always been fairly adamant about staying in metal. Their newer sculpts are also quite fantastic in general. Some of the older ones haven't aged well to be sure though.

SuperNewb wrote:

Maybe they should consider doing that for some of the other models, too.


Not sure why they would need to? I think only TAGs would need instructions at worst. The rest of their range consists of models which are 4-5 pieces, and fairly obvious what goes where.


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