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Made in gb
Most Glorious Grey Seer






So, you may be aware (as I am, albeit only dimly) of a contentious happening at the LVO.

Well, according to Warhammer Community, there’s an undeniably good end to that tale.

In short, a player by the name of Alex Fennel made a sporting decision which cost him his game. I’m afraid I’m not up on exactly what happened, but perhaps someone else is?

Anyways, another chap watching via Twitch, Marc Merrell, co founder of Riot Games gave Alex a $5,000 ‘good sportsmanship’ award off his own back,

Not only did Alex decide to donate this money to a Children’s Hospital, but convinced his employer to match that gift.

And now GW themselves have done the same. So for what I understand to have been excellent sportsmanship, a deserving cause is $15,000 the richer,

Smiles all round, I guess!

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/02/13 18:53:45


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Made in gb
Aspirant Tech-Adept




United Kingdom

Background info: https://www.frontlinegaming.org/2018/02/01/a-teachable-moment-from-lvo-40k-championships/

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/02/13 18:55:59


 
   
Made in gb
Aspirant Tech-Adept




United Kingdom

Spoiler:
Hello everyone, Geoff “iNcontroL” Robinson here discussing for your reading pleasure the streamed etiquette incident that went down at the LVO and how we can benefit from this moment in time.


What Happened:
Two of the best players you can experience playing Warhammer40k squared off in an advanced round of the 2018 LVO. These players are Alexander Fennel and Tony Grippando. For the purpose of this article, if you could do me the solid: when you see either name please make the sign of the cross and mutter “long may he reign” when we refer to Alex and can you squint and grit your teeth (not too hard) and mutter “please don’t say that name” when you read Tony. It will set the theme nicely.


This match was streamed. This is an important part of this because we aren’t selling out stadiums (YET) but we do have the awesome luxury of being viewers on a stream due to the fantastic dedication to make that possible by the FLG crew. Fortunately/Unfortunately this also means we have over a thousand people ready to bare witness to how we play and what is going on. It can also add stress and can make an already difficult situation, even more so. I say this not as an excuse but rather as a way to set the table for what is to come.

The match featured Alex (long may he reign) playing Space Wolves (mostly) and Tony playing Aeldareeeeeeee (Eldar). Both players had recently been selected by Sean Nayden (Team USA’s Captain) to be members of Team USA to go off to a foreign land and underperform at the ETC. A huge honor in Warhammer 40,000 and of course something we all take very seriously. Aside from tha Alex and Tony have competed, practiced and socialized as they are both top players in a community that while growing is still very small.

Tony’s deployment/first turn took something along the lines of 1 hour. This is incredibly inefficient and when the total game is supposed to be 2.5 hours can also become a problem. Whether that factored in or not I do not know as I have not asked Alex (long may he reign) directly but speeding up the remainder of the game is expected. When the time came for Alex (long may he reign) to take his turn he began by deploying one of his Assassins. This is something you would need to do “at the end of the movement phase.” This isn’t nothing by the way. Sometimes where we want to drop those deep strikers is in a place occupied by normally deployed units OR how far something advances and thus can then synergize with the unit arriving from reserves can also benefit from knowing exactly where something like an Assassin would be. Bottom line: Alex moved improperly and he knew it. Alex doesn’t contest this and freely admitted it on the stream. Tony Super-Helpful-Here-Let-Me-Measure-That-For-You Grippando was NOT WRONG in enforcing a order of operations mistake on Alex. But, but… butttttttttttttttttt — it was wrong to do it. The worst part? We all know it. Nobody on the stream, at the event or wearing the skin of Tony or Alex for one second thought it was OK. I will get to that later though.


Alex having not moved his entire army, an army of which is made up mostly of assault units called it then and there only moments later deciding to play it out. The game however was mostly over and we didn’t get to see two top tier players duke it out but rather one player exemplifying class and another (unfortunately) embodying what many would call the worst side of Warhammer 40,000 competitive play.

The game would result in Tony winning only to then face Nick Nanovati who would “Tony him” and jump his overall ITC score by ONE POINT to win $4,000, tons of prizes AND the title of ITC and LVO 40k champion.. WOAH. If people wanted justice.. well, they got it. But lets break down this event and talk about how we can all walk away from this better people.

Tony Grippando
Tony by the way, is not a bad guy. In fact, he is super nice. Am I saying this because he could crush my head like a pineapple with his rippling muscles and strangely perfectly angled jaw? Nope. In my time I was pretty buff too.. but we can talk about my body at a later date and preferably after I’ve been exercising for awhile. Tony is a top tier player who had a helluva year. His ATC team won for like, the 4th time? Which is amazing. He was at the top of the ITC which considering it has 7,000+ people involved is incredible AND he was in the top 8 at the LVO. But beyond that I’ve been around Tony and whether you want to believe it or not I am here to tell you he is a nice guy. Perhaps more relevant though is that he LOVES Warhammer 40,000 and competes at the highest level. That could be the excuse we make here for him. Surrounded by his peers at the final tourney of the circuit he was a few wins away from realizing his goals/dreams and nothing was going to stop him. Tony is also a young guy and in my experience in THESE moments specifically you can sometimes act out of character to help get that final push across the line.


Excuses or not the etiquette and “code of conduct” we Warhammer 40,000 players hold ourselves to IS important. It’s unofficial (in most competitions) but it’s unversally known. Had Alex’s movement been anything but him trying to speed up the game what Tony said/did wouldn’t be looked down on. We all make mistakes. But to help him measure out a move you were then going to point out signifies the end of his phase.. knowing this was clearly not what he intended is the kind of Warhammer 40,000 WE DON’T WANT TO WIN BY. We’ve all met “that guy” and if you haven’t? There is someone who is reluctant to attend a tourney because of the stereotype of “that guy.” Now, in my experience this kind of thing is rare and most people would never do what Tony did.. especially to a teammate, friend and in the final rounds of the biggest Warhammer 40,000 tourney _ever_. If you are interested in a big debate on how this is incorrect or “#TonywasFramed” please take it elsewhere. I am not stating my own personal opinion I am sharing with you the incredibly established sentiment that is universally known on matters such as these. What should Tony have done? I’m fond of saying things like “Hey Alex, you have to do this at the end of the phase. Remember that please! I don’t want to give you more mulligans” or “hey man they come in at the end” etc etc. With a player like Alex you are only saying that once and he is realizing that you are going to be tight on order of operations and he will act accordingly. This is the part where a lot of people feign ignorance and start saying “WHERE DO WE DRAW THE LINE? If a dude gets killed in overwatch do we let him TAKE IT BACK?” No, no you silly, silly internet troll. That is again where we reference the unfortunately unofficial “code of conduct” in Warhammer 40,000 which can loosely be described as “do I want to win that way?” or “is what I am doing making my opponent feel icky?” — for some this is too nebulous and they will be frustrated that it isn’t written in a tome or carried around on a leatherbound book and chain from a 30 foot tall robot judicator but we aren’t there yet.

Besides.. it isn’t like we don’t have role models on how to act at a Warhammer40k tourney…

Alexander Fennel
Having already broken down the incident I will simply talk about his reaction. Alex could have flipped out, he could have stormed off or.. being half British he could have removed his white satin glove, slapped tony and then tossed his “piping” hot tea in the face of the foe.


But Alex didn’t do those things.

Alex instead thought about it, realized he was technically in the wrong, assessed that he was strategically behind and probably couldn’t win (he was right) and said “good game.” He then thought better of it and declared he wanted to put on a show for the stream (immediately thought of others). They played it out with Tony almost never mentioning the incident and while crippled and behind Alex put up a fight and gave the stream viewers something to watch. Had he quit and walked away the FLG stream which organized front-page coverage for this event would have had a 2.5 hour block of nothing and lost viewers. The viewers would have ONLY the incident to watch and nothing more.

If that hasn’t made you happy yet, wait, there is more. Watching this particular game was the co-founder of Riot Games. Heard of them? They make a little game called League of Legends. Marc Merill was so moved by the show of sportsmanship that Alex displayed he tweeted saying he wanted to donate a $5,000 sportsmanship award in honor of the class act that is Alex. Upon hearing this Alex began to go to work on forwarding 100% of this $5,000 donation to a children’s hospital fund which has at this stage morphed into Alex’s employers also pledging to match the donation to the Children’s Hospital! Literally, the high-ground you thought Alex was perched on was merely an illusion…he’s like 6 levels higher and we can all only hope to aspire to that level of class.


The Teachable Moment
Winning is important and getting those accolades might not mean that much to all of you but to the top tier competitors in our little world of Warhammer 40,000 it IS very important. What Tony did to some might not be that big of a deal and to others is the worst offense…either way the take-away-thing for us here is that you don’t want to win that way. Be gracious, friendly and jovial. Be stoic, serious and tight. Both are fine. But bridging those play styles needs to be a gentleman. A class act or a role model. If you are doing something that calls into question those things and you are fighting for a title…maybe think about that? We’ve had people win major tourneys but when the path to get there is marred with drama or shadiness we don’t even talk about the win. That moment is tarnished. Alex took the loss and made it into a win. He is inspiring the best part of Warhammer 40,000 which is being a damn good general AND A BETTER HUMAN. As someone who…is known to be a bit snarky and maybe even a pinch mean from time to time I too can learn from Alex. I want to be that kind of opponent. The one where people respect the list, fear the general and look forward to the honor of squaring off with them knowing that if they win they outsmarted / played him and didn’t fall victim to Alex getting rules wrong in his favor, playing “gotcha” hammer or going back on his word.

We are lucky to have players like Tony with his great skill and tremendous ability. We are just SUPER lucky to have players like Alex who can show us how to conduct ourselves and turn a potentially stinker moment into one of the greatest shows of sportsmanship to ever grace Warhammer 40,000.
   
Made in ca
Longtime Dakkanaut





GW, you guys are doing great! Way to be an excellent example! Kudos!

 Galef wrote:
If you refuse to use rock, you will never beat scissors.
 
   
Made in ca
Anointed Dark Priest of Chaos





British Columbia

I am glad this benefited charity and is leading to GW trying to further encourage sportsmanship at high profile events.

My understanding is his opponent sprung somewhat if a gotcha moment on him alongside some contenrious slow play.

This is absolutely not the place to get into it though. The LVO thread has a many many page discussion of every possible interpretation and angle.

 Crimson Devil wrote:
That's what 7th edition is about. Yelling "Forge the Narrative Pussy!" while kicking your opponent in the dick.
 BlaxicanX wrote:
A young business man named Tom Kirby, who was a pupil of mine until he turned greedy, helped the capitalists hunt down and destroy the wargamers. He betrayed and murdered Games Workshop.


 
   
Made in us
Regular Dakkanaut




As much as I belly ache, whine, complain and accuse GW of being clueless money grubbing know-nothings I couldn't be more proud of the hobby at this time.

I really hope this gets some attention and we as community members can draw some inspiration from these upstanding people.

Now someone please nerf dark reapers.
   
Made in gb
Most Glorious Grey Seer






Indeed.

Interesting as the ‘wot ‘appened’ Article is (and it is!), this is the place for back slapping all those who saw the importance of the sportsmanship known.

Right or wrong, foolish or honourable is really quite subjective, and would detract from the good that’s come out of all this.

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Killer Klaivex







So, just to make sure I'm understanding this.

Two guys are playing a high stakes game. Guy A does something you can only do after immediately having moved your army. Then goes back to try and move the army, which results in him being told he's moved the game to the next phase now, and no take backsies because he's in a tournie.

Guy A then quits because he reckons that means he's lost automatically (having been strategically disadvantaged by not moving anything). But due to the extreme goodness of his humanity, he decides to actually play the game he just set up because people are watching. He loses (as everyone expected). But due to his apparently amazing show of sportsmanship in carrying on with the match, everyone gives lots of money to charity.

I'm all in favour of giving cash to charity for whatever reason. But if my reading of it is right, it happened because he deigned to carry on playing a game when it was apparent he'd lost, something people do every week down their local. Am I missing something?

This message was edited 4 times. Last update was at 2018/02/13 19:11:45



 
   
Made in gb
Most Glorious Grey Seer






More or less, from what I can gather.

But I feel it was more the ‘carry on, put on a show’ that really counts.

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Made in gb
Multispectral Hsien





Gosport, UK

 Ketara wrote:
So, just to make sure I'm understanding this.

Two guys are playing a high stakes game. Guy A does something you can only do after immediately having moved your army. Then goes back to try and move the army, which results in him being told he's made moved the game to that phase now, and no take backsies because he's in a tournie.

Guy A then quits because he reckons that means he's lost automatically (having not moved anything). But due to the goodness of his humanity, he decides to actually play the game because people are watching. He loses (as everyone expected). But due to his apparently amazing show of sportsmanship in carrying on with the match, everyone gives lots of money to charity.

I'm all in favour of giving cash to charity for whatever reason. But if my reading of it is right, it only happened because he deigned to carry on playing a game when it was apparent he'd lost, something people do every week down their local. Am I missing something?


Someone who co-founded League of Legends was watching, and they were impressed with his sportsmanship and gave him a $5000 sportsmanship prize. He donated it to charity and it was matched by his employer and now GW.
   
Made in gb
[SWAP SHOP MOD]
Killer Klaivex







 ImAGeek wrote:
 Ketara wrote:
So, just to make sure I'm understanding this.

Two guys are playing a high stakes game. Guy A does something you can only do after immediately having moved your army. Then goes back to try and move the army, which results in him being told he's made moved the game to that phase now, and no take backsies because he's in a tournie.

Guy A then quits because he reckons that means he's lost automatically (having not moved anything). But due to the goodness of his humanity, he decides to actually play the game because people are watching. He loses (as everyone expected). But due to his apparently amazing show of sportsmanship in carrying on with the match, everyone gives lots of money to charity.

I'm all in favour of giving cash to charity for whatever reason. But if my reading of it is right, it only happened because he deigned to carry on playing a game when it was apparent he'd lost, something people do every week down their local. Am I missing something?


Someone who co-founded League of Legends was watching, and they were impressed with his sportsmanship and gave him a $5000 sportsmanship prize. He donated it to charity and it was matched by his employer and now GW.

I'm not having a go at people giving money for whatever reason (as stated). I I'm just trying to figure out why him carrying on with a game he spent an hour setting up is apparently such a noteworthy and praiseworthy example of over the top sportsmanship that people are motivated by it. Because it seems like a run of the mill everyday gaming scenario to me. It feels a bit like if loads of people donated £20,000 to the RSPCA because he gave his opponent a swig from his canteen or let them reroll a D6, y'know?

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2018/02/13 19:14:53



 
   
Made in us
Battle-tested Knight Castellan Pilot






Wells that's terribly written and editorialized. I foresee a lot more garbage like this being tossed at the other player, which will turn this 'teachable moment' into a ironic lesson about legitimized cyber-bullying.

Anyway, I've had people pull the 'you went out of order, you can't back step' card in tournaments. Tough crap, acknowledging it doesn't make a player a saint, the technically correct player a bad person, nor is a viewer with more money than sense going to happen often.

Efficiency is the highest virtue. 
   
Made in us
Awesome Autarch






 Mad Doc Grotsnik wrote:
More or less, from what I can gather.

But I feel it was more the ‘carry on, put on a show’ that really counts.


And I think this was the crux of the issue with the game. GW has never wanted 40K to be high stakes or "take no prisoners". You can have tournament games and not be ruthless. While the "incident" in question was probably good for a story (i..e "hero vs. villain" as some podcast put it) for the final, the live streamed game was basically negative press, showcasing the worst side of the hobby to potential consumers, customers, younger players, etc.

I think this is GW doing a little coverage of bums and taking the sting off a generall negative occurence in a higher profile game setting.

 
   
Made in gb
[SWAP SHOP MOD]
Killer Klaivex







Actually, I just noticed that the prize for $5,000 went to him, and he donated it to charity. Whilst nothing to do with sportsmanship (seriously, I'm still baffled by the motivation behind that first donation), giving away $5,000 to charity you just got awarded is always respectable. So kudos on that score.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/02/13 19:17:26



 
   
Made in gb
Multispectral Hsien





Gosport, UK

 Ketara wrote:
Actually, I just noticed that the prize for $5,000 went to him, and he donated it to charity. Whilst nothing to do with sportsmanship (seriously, I'm still baffled by the motivation behind that first donation), giving away $5,000 to charity you just got awarded is always respectable. So kudos on that score.


Yeah, that’s the point I was making. The money originally was meant for him, and he donated it to charity, which is why it was then matched twice.

And the motivation is stated in the article, the guy was impressed that he carried on for the audience on twitch rather than leaving 2nand a ha,f hours of dead air after all the set up to stream it etc. Whether you agree is another matter, but it’s the guys money and he presumably has enough of it, so.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/02/13 19:21:08


 
   
Made in gb
Most Glorious Grey Seer






Spesh As said money was tripled.

However you may or may not feel about the happening itself, that’s the action of a good person.

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Made in us
Loyal Necron Lychguard






Palm Beach, FL

In short, Alex was under the impression that the game was going to be played a little looser with exact sequences and distances - there was a hard time limit that they needed to make sure the game was complete by, and there's little point in measuring exactly 9.001" when roughly 9 is exactly the same result and far quicker.

Tony took over 40% of the total game time for just his first turn, so Alex needed to hurry if he wanted to actually play the game. Placing his deep strikers early had absolutely no effect on the game state, and Tony helped him place them knowing he was going to call him on it.
   
Made in es
Dark Angels Librarian with Book of Secrets




Vigo. Spain.

Yes Ketara you are losing all the context of that situation but this is not the thread for that.

 Crimson Devil wrote:

Dakka does have White Knights and is also rather infamous for it's Black Knights. A new edition brings out the passionate and not all of them are good at expressing themselves in written form. There have been plenty of hysterical responses from both sides so far. So we descend into pointless bickering with neither side listening to each other. So posting here becomes more masturbation than conversation.

ERJAK wrote:
Forcing a 40k player to keep playing 7th is basically a hate crime.

 
   
Made in gb
Aspirant Tech-Adept




United Kingdom

 Eldarain wrote:
This is absolutely not the place to get into it though. The LVO thread has a many many page discussion of every possible interpretation and angle.

Link?
   
Made in us
Perturbed Blood Angel Tactical Marine





Indiana

Reading the GW article, they do not mention the controversy that lead up to the donation - which is great. Highlight the parts we want to exemplify and in the background Tournament Organizers can figure out how to work pass this piece. If your stuff is going to be streamed, you may want a way to make sure folks (viewers & players) don't feel cheated.
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran




My understanding from the articles I read was the guy that said you cant take back your turn actually helped him measure and move his units then told him he went out of turn.
   
Made in us
Awesome Autarch






San Diego, California

For anyone interested in learning more about this and hearing from Marc and Alex themselves what their motivations were, please join us for the live interview on the topic on our Twitch Channel tomorrow at 2:30pm PST. https://www.twitch.tv/frontlinegaming_tv

   
Made in es
Dark Angels Librarian with Book of Secrets




Vigo. Spain.

Chopxsticks wrote:
My understanding from the articles I read was the guy that said you cant take back your turn actually helped him measure and move his units then told him he went out of turn.

Basically, and he did that after using 1 hour for his first turn in a 2,5h game. He did slowplayed and helped his oponent measure just to call him out after forcing him to speed things up.
Then Alex conceded but did keep playing. Thats why everibody watching sided with Alex. Only people that defend Tony is people that dont know the proper context.
But Tony shouldt get bullyed for that. He apologized, thats enough, we all have our right to make mistakes. Nobod here is free of sin to throw rocks. 15k have gone to charity has a result of this. Thats what matters.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2018/02/13 19:31:37


 Crimson Devil wrote:

Dakka does have White Knights and is also rather infamous for it's Black Knights. A new edition brings out the passionate and not all of them are good at expressing themselves in written form. There have been plenty of hysterical responses from both sides so far. So we descend into pointless bickering with neither side listening to each other. So posting here becomes more masturbation than conversation.

ERJAK wrote:
Forcing a 40k player to keep playing 7th is basically a hate crime.

 
   
Made in gb
Most Glorious Grey Seer






 Reecius wrote:
For anyone interested in learning more about this and hearing from Marc and Alex themselves what their motivations were, please join us for the live interview on the topic on our Twitch Channel tomorrow at 2:30pm PST. https://www.twitch.tv/frontlinegaming_tv


I’m guessing they’ve buried whatever Hatchet might’ve existed, and again that’s pretty much all that matters, no?

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Killer Klaivex







 ImAGeek wrote:
 Ketara wrote:
Actually, I just noticed that the prize for $5,000 went to him, and he donated it to charity. Whilst nothing to do with sportsmanship (seriously, I'm still baffled by the motivation behind that first donation), giving away $5,000 to charity you just got awarded is always respectable. So kudos on that score.


Yeah, that’s the point I was making. The money originally was meant for him, and he donated it to charity, which is why it was then matched twice.

And the motivation is stated in the article, the guy was impressed that he carried on for the audience on twitch rather than leaving 2nand a ha,f hours of dead air after all the set up to stream it etc. Whether you agree is another matter, but it’s the guys money and he presumably has enough of it, so.


Hey, I once watched the King of Dubai take a £10,000 flutter on a horse and lose it without batting an eyelid. If this guy made LoL, it's probably pocket change for him. Once you reach a certain level of wealth against your personal spending, it doesn't mean much. That would explain why he was willing to donate it for what was essentially an extremely common gaming scenario.


 
   
Made in us
Stone Bonkers Fabricator General






Home Base: Waconia, MN (Minneapolis)

Kudos to GW for adding in. Love Alex and he's a class act. Big kudos to Riot Games for stepping up at first. Hugs all around.

Best Painted (2015 Adepticon 40k Champs)

They Shall Know Fear - Adepticon 40k TT Champion (2012 & 2013) & 40k TT Best Sport (2014), 40k TT Best Tactician (2015 & 2016) 
   
Made in jp
Longtime Dakkanaut





 Ketara wrote:
 ImAGeek wrote:
 Ketara wrote:
So, just to make sure I'm understanding this.

Two guys are playing a high stakes game. Guy A does something you can only do after immediately having moved your army. Then goes back to try and move the army, which results in him being told he's made moved the game to that phase now, and no take backsies because he's in a tournie.

Guy A then quits because he reckons that means he's lost automatically (having not moved anything). But due to the goodness of his humanity, he decides to actually play the game because people are watching. He loses (as everyone expected). But due to his apparently amazing show of sportsmanship in carrying on with the match, everyone gives lots of money to charity.

I'm all in favour of giving cash to charity for whatever reason. But if my reading of it is right, it only happened because he deigned to carry on playing a game when it was apparent he'd lost, something people do every week down their local. Am I missing something?


Someone who co-founded League of Legends was watching, and they were impressed with his sportsmanship and gave him a $5000 sportsmanship prize. He donated it to charity and it was matched by his employer and now GW.

I'm not having a go at people giving money for whatever reason (as stated). I I'm just trying to figure out why him carrying on with a game he spent an hour setting up is apparently such a noteworthy and praiseworthy example of over the top sportsmanship that people are motivated by it. Because it seems like a run of the mill everyday gaming scenario to me. It feels a bit like if loads of people donated £20,000 to the RSPCA because he gave his opponent a swig from his canteen or let them reroll a D6, y'know?


There is a little more to it than that. Player A (Alex) did not complain when player B took a long time setting up (good sportsmanship 1) but instead decided to increase his own speed of play to make up for lost time (good sportsmanship 2) . As A direct result of trying to play quickly he was called out for incorrect play by player B but again did not complain ( good sportsmanship 3 ) and decided to finish the unwinnable game to entertain the twitch audience (good sportsmanship 4). He was not a saint but he clearly behaved well in a situation were he could have had a bit of a tantrum and most importantly displayed no sense of bitterness or anger towards the other player.
The rich guy watching decided to offer a cash prize directly to Alex but he instead donated that money to charity.


   
Made in us
Stone Bonkers Fabricator General






Home Base: Waconia, MN (Minneapolis)

 Ketara wrote:
 ImAGeek wrote:
 Ketara wrote:
Actually, I just noticed that the prize for $5,000 went to him, and he donated it to charity. Whilst nothing to do with sportsmanship (seriously, I'm still baffled by the motivation behind that first donation), giving away $5,000 to charity you just got awarded is always respectable. So kudos on that score.


Yeah, that’s the point I was making. The money originally was meant for him, and he donated it to charity, which is why it was then matched twice.

And the motivation is stated in the article, the guy was impressed that he carried on for the audience on twitch rather than leaving 2nand a ha,f hours of dead air after all the set up to stream it etc. Whether you agree is another matter, but it’s the guys money and he presumably has enough of it, so.


Hey, I once watched the King of Dubai take a £10,000 flutter on a horse and lose it without batting an eyelid. If this guy made LoL, it's probably pocket change for him. Once you reach a certain level of wealth against your personal spending, it doesn't mean much. That would explain why he was willing to donate it for what was essentially an extremely common gaming scenario.


How many events go past 6 games? How many take place over 3 days on a weekend? How many are determining a 5k cash prize? How often is it a "Gotcha" that wins these things? How often is that televised? Now combine all of that. It's not a common gaming experience. It's one thing to continue to play a game because you're losing and the guy across from you is a good dude. It's less common to do that when you have a gentleman's agreement and the other dude breaks it. It was good of Alex to basically put on a clinic for people watching at home and to keep another Nova from happening (dead air for the final because one guy lost the roll off which I'm sure was going thru Alex's head since he was there too). Besides, the story isn't that the Riot games guy gave money to Alex. It's that Alex then essentially tripled that money for a charity thru others.

Best Painted (2015 Adepticon 40k Champs)

They Shall Know Fear - Adepticon 40k TT Champion (2012 & 2013) & 40k TT Best Sport (2014), 40k TT Best Tactician (2015 & 2016) 
   
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So not quitting out when you're punished (in a jerk move or otherwise) makes you 'the very best of sports', but no mention is even made of the blatant slow playing and being a jerk which resulted in the entire scenario arising?

Huh.
   
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 Lord Damocles wrote:
So not quitting out when you're punished (in a jerk move or otherwise) makes you 'the very best of sports', but no mention is even made of the blatant slow playing and being a jerk which resulted in the entire scenario arising?

Huh.


Him not bringing up the blatant slow playing which caused the scenario is one of the big points of his being a good sport.
   
 
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