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Made in us
Decrepit Dakkanaut






Omadon's Realm



Any ideas why it's doing this?



 
   
Made in nl
[MOD]
Indomitable hell rider of glorious renown






the Netherlands

Checked via Firefox myself, not getting a warning. It may be due to certain ads that are in rotation around your neck of the woods, but I could be wrong.

Be ash and cinder forevermore!

V - 11 | T - 3 | 敗 - 40

DakkaDakka | Where you thank the mods for baning you! 
   
Made in us
Kid_Kyoto






Probably work

It means that the certificate is signed by an Authority that Firefox does not recognize.

Looking at the certificate information, it's signed by Let's Encrypt, which is a relatively new but trustworthy CA. I'm surprised it's not in Firefox by default. Are you on an old version?

Really, all having a certificate signed by any authority means is that you (generally) paid a lot of money to some guys who say "yeah, we recognize these guys who paid us a lot of money". You also don't get these nasty little messages. Honestly, I don't know why Chrome/Firefox bother.

TL;DR: It's probably entirely safe to click the "Add Exception..." button.

Assume all my mathhammer comes from here: https://github.com/daed/mathhammer 
   
Made in au
Incorporating Wet-Blending






Australia

 daedalus wrote:
Really, all having a certificate signed by any authority means is that you (generally) paid a lot of money to some guys who say "yeah, we recognize these guys who paid us a lot of money". You also don't get these nasty little messages. Honestly, I don't know why Chrome/Firefox bother.

Let's Encrypt actually signs certificates for free - it was founded by the EFF to make online security cheap and easy.

The reason why Chrome and Firefox give these warnings is because the certificate authority is vouching for the authenticity of the website. An invalid security certificate can mean that someone is trying to impersonate the website you're visiting but failed to forge that website's security certificate. That might not be a disaster on DakkaDakka, but you don't want it happening on your bank's website without the user being informed in a big scary warning.

"When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."
-C.S. Lewis 
   
Made in us
Kid_Kyoto






Probably work

I was being facetious. When the guy vouching for you isn't much more secure, trustworthy, or reliable than you are, it's not really worth much other than making modern browsers not spook your customers. Last time I checked, Tucows only needed a email of a driver's license as proof of who you were before they'd issue you a certificate, and they're resellers for several CA's. That's scary.

Don't get me wrong; authorities raise the level of effort required to circumvent them, but a false sense of security causes more damage than otherwise.


Edit: Removed some stuff that might have been potentially snide. It was uncalled for.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/04/11 22:22:37


Assume all my mathhammer comes from here: https://github.com/daed/mathhammer 
   
Made in us
Member of the Ethereal Council




USA

Check your computer's date and time. If it's wildly off it can cause web browsers to fail security certificates because the dates aren't lining up.

   
Made in gb
[ADMIN]
Da Big Mek






London, UK

 LordofHats wrote:
Check your computer's date and time. If it's wildly off it can cause web browsers to fail security certificates because the dates aren't lining up.


Yes, this is the most likely cause - if you have a bad battery on your motherboard and the clock resets when you go without power for a while, if the time is more than 6 months in the past, our SSL certificates will throw that error in firefox as we renew with Let's Encrypt every 6 months.

Check out our new, fully plastic tabletop wargame - Maelstrom's Edge, made by Dakka!
 
   
 
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