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Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






Has anyone else ever dealt with this issue before?

I'm not much of a painter. When I was in high school I used to paint for fun those old metal reaper models (I mean at 3 dollars for a mini in those days, who cares if you mess it up). But that was 14 years ago and since then I've been through college and a whole decades worth of life. When I came back to 40K I was excited to play, but I find I have this strange innate fear of painting now. I'm always worried because I do not know color theory well, I've actually never been very good at it. And I've spent a fortune on my models, I don't want them to come out looking like junk.

I have tried a lot of different things to motivate my self. I've tried to start a painting and modeling blog, I invested in better lighting for my painting desk, bought new brushes and so on. I've got a lot of nice GW and Vallejo paints, and 4-5 armies plus the KD board game to paint up. But every time I look at my painting table, I just get this intense unnerved feeling and I find an excuse not to sit down.

Anyone out there have any advice for getting past this who has been through it before? I just want to learn to enjoy painting my figures!

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/08/16 16:58:27


 
   
Made in us
Krazed Killa Kan





Denver, Colorado

The sad truth is that, more than likely, the first models you paint aren't going to be good. I have a unit of shoota boyz I painted when I just started and they're...........not great. And that's ok for 2 reasons:

The first is that you have to start somewhere.

The second is that no one is going to judge your models as harshly as you are. Hell's Bells, even having a painted army, even a moderately well painted one, is better than like 60% of players.

So, my advice is - just get started. Don't worry about color theory or winning golen demon awards, just have fun, paint what you like, how you like. If someone does criticize your paint job (which I haven't personally heard anyone do, EVER, in 6 years), don't sweat it.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
Also, last year I started going back over my entire ork army and cleaning up old paintjobs. It wasn't hard to do and didn't require stripping them down or anything. There's nothing wrong with taking a second pass at models later on if you've improved or if you're unsatisfied.

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 2018/08/16 17:10:58


"Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment." Words to live by. 
   
Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






 Kap'n Krump wrote:
The sad truth is that, more than likely, the first models you paint aren't going to be good. I have a unit of shoota boyz I painted when I just started and they're...........not great. And that's ok for 2 reasons:

The first is that you have to start somewhere.

The second is that no one is going to judge your models as harshly as you are. Hell's Bells, even having a painted army, even a moderately well painted one, is better than like 90% of players.

So, my advice is - just get started. Don't worry about color theory or winning golen demon awards, just have fun, paint what you like, how you like. If someone does criticize your paint job (which I haven't heard anyone do, EVER, in 6 years), don't sweat it.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
Also, last year I started going back over my entire ork army and cleaning up old paintjobs. It wasn't hard to do and didn't require stripping them down or anything. There's nothing wrong with taking a second pass at models later on if you've improved or if you're unsatisfied.


I think in the back of my head I know that I need to just jump in somewhere and go nuts. I recently bought some harlequins and I was thinking that they might be the perfect place to start. It doesn't really seem to matter what colors you pick, it all works for them scheme wise!

If I Prime > Base Coat > Layer > Wash > Detail > Highlight > Base (ground) > Varnish, maybe it will come out looking a lot better than I think it will?
   
Made in nz
Dakka Veteran





If you're worried about your actual painting skill, IE brush control and colour choices, there are a few things to try.

First off, Reaper still DO the $3 models, they're called Bones and are super cheap, so maybe you could pick up a few that you like and practise on those.

Alternately, you can just practise painting with acrylics on paper to brush up (badum-tiss) on brush control. Draw or print an outline and paint it.

As for colour theory - Dakka and other painting forums are a huge resource for this, both for learning it or for tapping in to the hive mind for advice and feedback.

There are also scheme testers for some armies, I *think* on bolter and chainsword..?

And finally - everything can be stripped if you mess it up. Don't forget that.

Get a brush in hand, put on a movie in the background and have at it! Have fun, and good luck

   
Made in gb
Gangly Grot Rebel





Island Lake, IL

What I would do is leave out the minis you're working on with the paints, etc on the table or the desk you do them at.

When you're in the mood, just start painting some stuff on them.Whatever makes sense color-wise go for it.

There isn't a wrong way to pain them because they are your models and you're army can look however you want.

Think of the color you want. and just dab a little on the model - If you like how it looks then keep applying it.


 
   
Made in us
Legendary Master of the Chapter






Personally have gotten at lot better about getting cold feet when jumping into a project by just planning everything. and i mean everything out.

make a list or clean and sub assemble all the things.

plan out my colors (prime, base coat, details)
pull up a color wheel, make a decision on the scheme.
then



 Unit1126PLL wrote:
 Scott-S6 wrote:
And yet another thread is hijacked for Unit to ask for the same advice, receive the same answers and make the same excuses.

Oh my god I'm becoming martel.
Send help!

 
   
Made in gb
Esteemed Veteran Space Marine






Northumberland, England

Ok, so here's my two-bob:

You're probably suffering from no more than a little indecision over how to go about painting them, and and some apprehension over not wanting to waste paint and ruin models that you've spent money on - which is totally understandable. I'm like that just about every time I start something new. So here's what I'd do: Start off a LotR Gondorian Army or perhaps an Iron Warriors army. The reasoning is that, being largely metallics, they are quick, easy and simply. You can bash out a decent looking unit in little time at all, all whilst familiarising yourself with common techniques and, most importantly, over coming the mental block. A coloured army requires more in the way of colour composition, where a metallic army does not.

If you're interested (And please forgive any perceived blowing of my own trumpet - just giving an example ), here's the first Gondorian I painted:

Spoiler:


Nothing fancy, here's how I did it:

Spoiler:
Armour:

Prime Black > Drybrush Leadbelcher > Wash Nuln Oil > Highlight Runefang Steel

Leather/Brown:

Base Rhinox Hide > Wash Agrax Earthshade >Highlight (a couple of times) with a mix of Mournfang Brown and Rhinox Hide - adding more MFB in each time.

Black:

Base Abaddon Black > Highlight Eshin Grey > Dawnstone > Administratum Grey

Gold: Base Mournfang Brown, Layer Retributor Armour, Wash Agrax Earthshade, Highlight Auric Armour Gold . Liberator Gold

Face:

Base Ratskin Flesh > Wash Reikland Fleshshade > Highlight Cadian Fleshtone > 50:50 CFT and Kislev Flesh > Kislev Flesh

Et voila! Pretty simple, not too complicated and looks decent enough to raise the spirits (IMHO).

Into the Fires of Battle! Unto the Anvil of War!

Salamanders 2nd Company - 2100 pts

Then an archer of Northumberland,
Saw slain was the lord Percye,
He bare a bent bow in his hand,
Was made of a trusty tree.
 
   
Made in gb
Wise Ethereal with Bodyguard







You really do.just have to sit down and get paint in stuff. I go through waves of super keeness and sometimes feel.a bit disappointed in results when what I get on the model.doesnt match what is in my head. However, don't just be critical if your results, work out something that you've done better than the last time around and don't be afraid to post here for c&c.and a more independent assessment of your work.

Please excuse any spelling errors. I use a tablet frequently and software keyboards are a pain!

Terranwing - w3;d1;l1
51st Dunedinw2;d0;l0
Cadre Coronal Afterglow w1;d0;l0 
   
Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






 Flinty wrote:
You really do.just have to sit down and get paint in stuff. I go through waves of super keeness and sometimes feel.a bit disappointed in results when what I get on the model.doesnt match what is in my head. However, don't just be critical if your results, work out something that you've done better than the last time around and don't be afraid to post here for c&c.and a more independent assessment of your work.


Thanks, I think I'm going to make a solid plan to sit down this weekend and paint, and then revive my old Dakka modeling blog and ask for opinions.

A friend of mine recently offered to split a box of Grey Knights with me so that we can build some killteams. I'm thinking with the smoothness of the power armor, and so on, maybe that will be a good place to start.

   
Made in gb
Jealous that Horus is Warmaster





London, UK

I like to paint alongside a good YouTube session, or a movie.

Although there are times, when you pick up a brush and then spend the next four hours modelling or collating bits for a conversion, working out angles with blue tac etc. Maybe that's my subconscious saying 'no painting tonight fella.'

   
Made in gb
Perfect Shot Ultramarine Predator Pilot





UK

 Togusa wrote:
When I came back to 40K I was excited to play, but I find I have this strange innate fear of painting now. And I've spent a fortune on my models, I don't want them to come out looking like junk.

Anyone out there have any advice for getting past this who has been through it before? I just want to learn to enjoy painting my figures!

My advice would be to keep it neat and simple to start with. You can get decent results by dry brushing, using shades and technical paints. I recently returned to WH40K having never painted before and I'm both enjoying it and achieving what I consider to be a perfectly good tabletop standard with little or no experience. Warhammer TV tutorials, the Citadel paint system and advice from experienced painters here on Dakka are all you need to get started.

My journey so far: https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/758675.page

https://www.flickr.com/photos/brothercastor/
Ultramarines [800]
Chaos Knights [1500]
 
   
Made in gb
Using Inks and Washes




U.k

My advice is similar to the above ones.

Don’t try to do to much. Base and wash. Dry brush if you want. U can get an instant highlight on some models by washing and wiping off the top details with your thumb. Keep it easy.

Don’t expect great results. My mate recently got back to painting and wasn’t happy with his individual models but he quickly got a whole army painted in base colours and washes and it looked great all together even though the individual models weren’t evy metal standard. I’ve got armies I’ve painted over a decade and I can see which ones I did earlier and aren’t very good but they get lost in a whole army on the table.

Experiment. It can be stripped or just painted over if it’s not a major part.

Set goals. I lay out the models I’m planning on painting. Somethings whole armies. And as I paint them I move them to a different place. As you progress you get a bigger set up of painted and the grey plastic decreases. It’s very satisfying and pushes me on. Finishing that last unit is great.

Just start! It’s supposed to fun. Don’t stress about it and get on. If you don’t like start saving up for commission painters. But it is fun once you get into it. I’ve had 10 months off work with an injury and have painted so much, it’s stopped me from going mad and I’ve sold a few pieces too. I don’t have a table set up. I just paint I’m my sitting room on small table in front of the telly. Luckily I’m single and my daughter doesn’t mind being surrounded by her dads models.

Good luck and get on with it mate! You’ll be better than you expect.

   
Made in ky
Regular Dakkanaut




Grand Cayman

Good advice here. Stick to some more "basic" models to get started. Harlequins are filled with awesome detail, but the precision of painting required to make them into what you imagine is....hard. Grey knights are awesome to start with. Silver armies are very forgiving and look great with washes. You also have loads of cloaks and fiddly bits that you can play with as you want to try new methods. Try to turn out a kill team for each army you have. Each new army will offer a new challenge to paint.

I started off with my old RBT01 marine army and went silver with red highlights. I had a blast and finished the whole army, but now I cringe and will end up someday redoing them. But not yet. (I am still in the middle of learning how to paint decently). When I return to that old army, (I had since I was 12) it will become a thing of beauty.

Meanwhile, I have an awesome Kroot army that has forced me to learn all new methods of painting. I have fantasy armies that wait in line that will require me to learn additional new methods. Years will pass and instead of drinking with the 20 year olds at the local bar, I will have glass shelves filled with painted armies to remind me of what I did over the years.

Start slow, read up on some simple methods and remember to post pictures of your painting here. I love reading the Work in Progress blogs.

   
Made in us
Hollerin' Herda with Squighound Pack





Togusa every journey starts with the first step. I've been painting over 40 years. Everyone has down times. You will get better the more you paint. I got better at 40k stuff by two ways. First I went small epic just came out and I was told it didn't matter about detail. I jumped on that challenge and was able to eventually paint helmet details on my terminators. After that the 40k stuff seemed huge. The other way is to work on terrain. Don't bother with GW stuff. Get some foam board and have at it. Just use some geso paint (hope spelling right) to prime it. If using aerosol primer it will melt the foam. Just build stuff then paint it. I just got done two pipe conduits. Left over plastic card, metal pipe, two elbow joints and I got two good pieces of terrain plus more skill in doing what I love. The important thing is just have fun. If nothing else team up with a buddy and work together on a project. Last thing lean on us here at dakka. There's probably hundreds of years of experience here. We will help. I know I joined this year and I am still learning from others. Take care have fun!

 
   
Made in au
Fresh-Faced New User





Hey mate, i know exactly how you feel and have dealt with a similar issue before. There wasn't a lot of resources when i first started painting. I had no idea how re the methods of achieving a good result and was intimidated by small details ect. I got into lots of bad habits and hit a plateau for over a decade of painting.

I decided to improve my painting but sort of meandered around for a bit and got discouraged. I had a goal of what i wanted but not a solid plan of how to achieve that and i didn't really have the belief or confidence that i could achieve great results.

What i found is this: Bad experience are demotivating and put you in the position you are currently stuck. Good experiences are enjoyable and will make you seek the painting desk rather than avoid it because it is pleasurable.

You want to limit your exposure to bad experiences and have lots of good ones.

How i achieved this: I went back to the pure basics and decided to improve my skill sets one technique at a time.

Start with basing or building your models. Find some videos. Research and develop a plan. Then endevour to build those models as cleanly as possible and work on achieving a perfect prime and smooth base coat. You will like the result and its enjoyable to make nice things. From here, just keep going - work on improving your shading and layering/highlighting. Then start to add things like weathering, advanced lenses ect one at a time. Just follow tutorials as closely as possible and copy and don't worry about color theory or developing your own schemes yet. Just focus on one good result at a time and remember at the end of the day that you can always strip the models.

If you are patient and dedicated you will make it, you just have to refresh your mindset and associate your painting desk with enjoyable results instead of frustrating mistakes from the past. Sorry this was long winded but i hope it helps.

   
Made in ca
Trustworthy Shas'vre






 Brother Castor wrote:

My advice would be to keep it neat and simple to start with. You can get decent results by dry brushing, using shades and technical paints. I recently returned to WH40K having never painted before and I'm both enjoying it and achieving what I consider to be a perfectly good tabletop standard with little or no experience. Warhammer TV tutorials, the Citadel paint system and advice from experienced painters here on Dakka are all you need to get started.


This right here. Too many beginning painters get too ambitious; complex paint jobs take time, effort, technique and planning. Start with something dead simple, many good suggestions above.

I will say the biggest beginner problem seems to be keeping the paint smooth. Concentrate on that, it's worth it. Warhammer TV Duncan goes on about 2 thin coats, he's right, though this will vary depending on the paint.

   
Made in us
Awesome Autarch






And I'll hop in and give some contrarian advice...lol.

1) Be 100% honest with yourself. Do you even want to paint? If you don't, it just won't happen. I don't mean "do you love to paint", but if you've really zero interest in doing it, you'll probably never do it enough to get comfortable with it. It's fine, there are some ways around this (but none of them are grand or cheap).

2) Be 100% honest with yourself. How well do you want your minis to turn out? You won't be a Golden Demon winning painter anytime soon. If you're learning, accept that and aim low. Get the very minimum and basics down. Don't chase that dragon you'll never catch. A squad of okay painted guys is more impressive than one slightly better miniature you spent 32 hours painting. Do you just want them painted to play? Consider if you can use coloured spray primers, paint a few items on the figure, and dip them or dry brush them. People are more happy to see effort than they are results. No one expects a gorgeous army when you show up at the table - but painted minis are better than grey plastic.

3) Be 100% honest with yourself. Are you playing an army you want to paint? If you're chasing a meta or a powerful net list and just buying arbitrary units...this'll kick you in the teeth. The best way to motivate yourself to paint...is to buy stuff you actually might want to paint at some point. You will NEVER sit down and finish an army if it doesn't interest you.

4) Do you have the funds to have stuff commission painted? Some studios like Frontline Gaming offer a kind of bare minimum "tournament standard" commission painting service. If you have the funds, don't be shy about it - go that route. Heck, I probably would if I had the disposable income.

5) Cheat. I mean it. Use every trick you can find. If you're playing space marines, you can literally spray them the base colour, dip or wash them, and paint the base, flock it and you're done...it won't look amazing, but if you just want very basic paintjobs, use every tool, every cheat, every hack you can get your hands on. If you're not interested in becoming a great painter or building a genuine skill set...no worries, cheat.

6) If you are interested in actually becoming better at painting...there is no shortcut. It's the old inverse problem...as you spend time, you'll get better...and then you'll spend less time. There's no chute-n-ladder shortcut up there, but I think you realize that.

7) One good way to motivate yourself is simple: don't play with unpainted stuff. It sucks...but it's a wonderful way to be motivated. It took me a long time to get around to that method but it's superb. Hell I don't even open a box until I'm about to assemble and prime it. This takes a lot of discipline and frustration and yeah, you may sit out for 2-3 months while you're getting 750-1000 points up to snuff, but it's a failsafe way of motivating yourself. If you build 2000 points of grey plastic...you'll never paint it. Ever. It'll become a mental mountain and you'll never even step foot on the hillside. When it's one box or one character or one vehicle at a time? It's 1000% easier to get motivated. "Damn, I want this on the table".

8) In line with the above...put one thing on your painting table. The thing you're painting. Everything else stays in a box or is stashed out of sight. You won't even paint a squad of five figures if you look and see 140 other models on the table next to you which need painting. Don't mentally ambush yourself like that. Concentrate on the project at hand.

 
   
Made in us
Nurgle Predator Driver with an Infestation






Queen Creek, AZ

I have goals that I set for how many models by a certain time.

You could put away models so you only have the ones you are working on, so you dont see the pile of plastic and metal that isnt painted.

All the suggestion above will help you move forward with it.
   
Made in gb
Been Around the Block





1. Know the models you want to paint use the citadel paints app to find the colours that appeal to you.

2. Find the colours you want to do, use the app for the simple layering technique.

3. Pick 1-2 accent colours for your army, they get the most layers/smoothest transitions. Everything else is done with base, wash, layer, highlight to keep it simple.

4. Also models look like ass until they are fully finished so BELIEVE!

5. Keep your painting station tidy

6. Only have finished models on display

7. Don't work on huge batches if your motivation is struggling.

8. Focus on being neat when you are learning to paint, for table top standard a neat simple paint job with a bright accent colour will get many admiring looks.

My Bad Moonz (link in sig) use this technique.

   
Made in gb
Perfect Shot Ultramarine Predator Pilot





UK

WaaarghRob wrote:
Also models look like ass until they are fully finished so BELIEVE!

So true! It's motivation itself no not leave a model half done.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/brothercastor/
Ultramarines [800]
Chaos Knights [1500]
 
   
Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






Pointer5 wrote:
Togusa every journey starts with the first step. I've been painting over 40 years. Everyone has down times. You will get better the more you paint. I got better at 40k stuff by two ways. First I went small epic just came out and I was told it didn't matter about detail. I jumped on that challenge and was able to eventually paint helmet details on my terminators. After that the 40k stuff seemed huge. The other way is to work on terrain. Don't bother with GW stuff. Get some foam board and have at it. Just use some geso paint (hope spelling right) to prime it. If using aerosol primer it will melt the foam. Just build stuff then paint it. I just got done two pipe conduits. Left over plastic card, metal pipe, two elbow joints and I got two good pieces of terrain plus more skill in doing what I love. The important thing is just have fun. If nothing else team up with a buddy and work together on a project. Last thing lean on us here at dakka. There's probably hundreds of years of experience here. We will help. I know I joined this year and I am still learning from others. Take care have fun!


Thank you. You mentioned detail work and I have to say that this is one of the most frightening parts for me about painting. Gold trim, small symbols and such. They're quite hard to do, and often I find it hard to make a decision on what color to even use. I do have a lot of GW terrain as I'm trying to get a table set up at my residence. That might be a great first place to start! Thanks for your support.




Automatically Appended Next Post:
 Elbows wrote:
And I'll hop in and give some contrarian advice...lol.

1) Be 100% honest with yourself. Do you even want to paint? If you don't, it just won't happen. I don't mean "do you love to paint", but if you've really zero interest in doing it, you'll probably never do it enough to get comfortable with it. It's fine, there are some ways around this (but none of them are grand or cheap).

2) Be 100% honest with yourself. How well do you want your minis to turn out? You won't be a Golden Demon winning painter anytime soon. If you're learning, accept that and aim low. Get the very minimum and basics down. Don't chase that dragon you'll never catch. A squad of okay painted guys is more impressive than one slightly better miniature you spent 32 hours painting. Do you just want them painted to play? Consider if you can use coloured spray primers, paint a few items on the figure, and dip them or dry brush them. People are more happy to see effort than they are results. No one expects a gorgeous army when you show up at the table - but painted minis are better than grey plastic.

3) Be 100% honest with yourself. Are you playing an army you want to paint? If you're chasing a meta or a powerful net list and just buying arbitrary units...this'll kick you in the teeth. The best way to motivate yourself to paint...is to buy stuff you actually might want to paint at some point. You will NEVER sit down and finish an army if it doesn't interest you.

4) Do you have the funds to have stuff commission painted? Some studios like Frontline Gaming offer a kind of bare minimum "tournament standard" commission painting service. If you have the funds, don't be shy about it - go that route. Heck, I probably would if I had the disposable income.

5) Cheat. I mean it. Use every trick you can find. If you're playing space marines, you can literally spray them the base colour, dip or wash them, and paint the base, flock it and you're done...it won't look amazing, but if you just want very basic paintjobs, use every tool, every cheat, every hack you can get your hands on. If you're not interested in becoming a great painter or building a genuine skill set...no worries, cheat.

6) If you are interested in actually becoming better at painting...there is no shortcut. It's the old inverse problem...as you spend time, you'll get better...and then you'll spend less time. There's no chute-n-ladder shortcut up there, but I think you realize that.

7) One good way to motivate yourself is simple: don't play with unpainted stuff. It sucks...but it's a wonderful way to be motivated. It took me a long time to get around to that method but it's superb. Hell I don't even open a box until I'm about to assemble and prime it. This takes a lot of discipline and frustration and yeah, you may sit out for 2-3 months while you're getting 750-1000 points up to snuff, but it's a failsafe way of motivating yourself. If you build 2000 points of grey plastic...you'll never paint it. Ever. It'll become a mental mountain and you'll never even step foot on the hillside. When it's one box or one character or one vehicle at a time? It's 1000% easier to get motivated. "Damn, I want this on the table".

8) In line with the above...put one thing on your painting table. The thing you're painting. Everything else stays in a box or is stashed out of sight. You won't even paint a squad of five figures if you look and see 140 other models on the table next to you which need painting. Don't mentally ambush yourself like that. Concentrate on the project at hand.


They're all great suggestions and there are some good questions I should ask myself in here. But I have to say that #7 isn't an option. I live about 100 miles from my FLGS and I work an extremely difficult job in a small community with no support network from family or friends. So when I get to go play on the weekends it is basically my one sanity check. All the other stuff you mentioned though, well that's a good place to start I think!

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/08/17 14:44:53


 
   
Made in us
Awesome Autarch






Yeah, that's more an icing on the cake kind of thing...also it's something that's far easier to do when you are a seasoned painter and you know the tricks and methods to get stuff to the tabletop reasonably quick.

Of our local sub-group of 12 guys, only two or three of us are at that stage. The rest are still "BUY IT ALL...eBay it later" lol. Also, if you ever do more than one army, this is where it can kick in - because you have a playable force, so then you can be more stringent on yourself.

it's best if you have at least one friend/opponent whom you get into a painted arms race with. But it sounds like that may not be an option for you at the moment.

 
   
Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






 Elbows wrote:
Yeah, that's more an icing on the cake kind of thing...also it's something that's far easier to do when you are a seasoned painter and you know the tricks and methods to get stuff to the tabletop reasonably quick.

Of our local sub-group of 12 guys, only two or three of us are at that stage. The rest are still "BUY IT ALL...eBay it later" lol. Also, if you ever do more than one army, this is where it can kick in - because you have a playable force, so then you can be more stringent on yourself.

it's best if you have at least one friend/opponent whom you get into a painted arms race with. But it sounds like that may not be an option for you at the moment.


I'm going to try this!

Lately I've been playing a LOT of KT. I just happen to have a box of unbuilt ETB Intercessors and a box of Reivers.

My plan is to create a small primaris KT, and get the models painted with at least 4 different colors and at least one wash and a drybrush highlight.

I figured that since I do like space marines, I'm going to just paint each model a different marine chapter color.

I figure it will be easy for my to just select my favorite chapters and that should help me to focus. Also, I recieved these models for free from a friend, so if I 'mess up' it won't be that much of a big deal, right?

In addition, I have a plan!

For these models I'm not going to worry about basing, I'm just going to focus on getting color on the physical models. And, I'm going to try personalizing these models so that my interest in getting them done doesn't falter over time. I think if I can just get started, I will eventually get past this problem.



   
Made in gb
Perfect Shot Ultramarine Predator Pilot





UK

Citadel's technical paints actually make basing really easy.




I use Armageddon Dust and paint the edges of my bases black too.

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 2018/08/17 21:04:42


https://www.flickr.com/photos/brothercastor/
Ultramarines [800]
Chaos Knights [1500]
 
   
Made in us
Ship's Officer





LA

The hurdle I always have to get through is priming/basecoating. I usually find that after that is done I can finish. But using rattle cans and trying to not mess up the models is a pain for me. I just really dislike spray painting. I'm tempted to try and brush on vallejo surface primer but I don't think its designed for that.

 
   
Made in us
Legendary Master of the Chapter






 Brother Castor wrote:
Citadel's technical paints actually make basing really easy.




I use Armageddon Dust and paint the edges of my bases black too.



4 Ground, warlord makes basing renders as well you get like 4x the amount for nearly the same price as GW technicals. or otherwise you can make your own for cheaper. including crackle, trench mud. its mostly just PVA and grit mixed together with paint. the hard part is getting the right mix.

 Unit1126PLL wrote:
 Scott-S6 wrote:
And yet another thread is hijacked for Unit to ask for the same advice, receive the same answers and make the same excuses.

Oh my god I'm becoming martel.
Send help!

 
   
Made in ca
Trustworthy Shas'vre






 Thargrim wrote:
The hurdle I always have to get through is priming/basecoating. I usually find that after that is done I can finish. But using rattle cans and trying to not mess up the models is a pain for me. I just really dislike spray painting. I'm tempted to try and brush on vallejo surface primer but I don't think its designed for that.


None the less, it works fairly well just brushed on.

   
Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






 Brother Castor wrote:
Citadel's technical paints actually make basing really easy.




I use Armageddon Dust and paint the edges of my bases black too.



I use these actually, I'm just not going to worry about basing things for the moment and only focus on painting models.
   
Made in us
Committed Chaos Cult Marine






 Warpig1815 wrote:
Ok, so here's my two-bob:

You're probably suffering from no more than a little indecision over how to go about painting them, and and some apprehension over not wanting to waste paint and ruin models that you've spent money on - which is totally understandable. I'm like that just about every time I start something new. So here's what I'd do: Start off a LotR Gondorian Army or perhaps an Iron Warriors army. The reasoning is that, being largely metallics, they are quick, easy and simply. You can bash out a decent looking unit in little time at all, all whilst familiarising yourself with common techniques and, most importantly, over coming the mental block. A coloured army requires more in the way of colour composition, where a metallic army does not.

If you're interested (And please forgive any perceived blowing of my own trumpet - just giving an example ), here's the first Gondorian I painted:

Spoiler:


Nothing fancy, here's how I did it:

Spoiler:
Armour:

Prime Black > Drybrush Leadbelcher > Wash Nuln Oil > Highlight Runefang Steel

Leather/Brown:

Base Rhinox Hide > Wash Agrax Earthshade >Highlight (a couple of times) with a mix of Mournfang Brown and Rhinox Hide - adding more MFB in each time.

Black:

Base Abaddon Black > Highlight Eshin Grey > Dawnstone > Administratum Grey

Gold: Base Mournfang Brown, Layer Retributor Armour, Wash Agrax Earthshade, Highlight Auric Armour Gold . Liberator Gold

Face:

Base Ratskin Flesh > Wash Reikland Fleshshade > Highlight Cadian Fleshtone > 50:50 CFT and Kislev Flesh > Kislev Flesh

Et voila! Pretty simple, not too complicated and looks decent enough to raise the spirits (IMHO).


That is a great idea! I might be able to get a hold of some stuff like this. Actually, on the topic I painted this weekend! If I can remember after work tonight, I'll upload a couple of pictures.

I'm working on a 5 man Deathwatch Kill Team!
   
Made in ca
Dipping With Wood Stain




t.dot

Every journey begins with a step, and all a journey is, is a sequence of steps. You take enough of them, and you'll find out that you'll have gone incredible distances, even climbed mountains.

The trick is to discipline yourself to take those steps one after another, even little ones, and to keep going. You trip, you stumble, you fall. You pick yourself up and keep going.

Everyone makes this journey; no amazing painter started off amazing.

So get into the habit of painting regularly. Don't worry if your stuff isn't perfect to start, that will come with time. Just put in the effort, never stop experimenting, and never stop learning.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2018/08/21 14:59:01


   
 
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