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Made in us
Drone without a Controller




Les Etats Unis

I've recently finished assembling a squad of Tau Fire Warriors for a Kill Team, uh, kill team. The models look amazing and definitely have held up over time, with one exception: Since GW decided to go for an East Asian aesthetic, most Tau models have bizarre segmented thigh pads, up to and including the infantry. I absolutely hate these things, and since I'm not yet making a full army, I've decided it would be worth my time to try and cover them up, I'm not sure which modelling substance would be best to use here.

For context, the gaps on Fire Warrior kneepads are about .05mm deep and 0.5mm thick, perhaps less. I'm looking for any modelling substance that would cover up these lines without adding too much bulk to the thigh armor. Right now, I'm considering either using Liquid Green Stuff or just a hearty application of superglue, but I'm worried that LGS would just shrink and fall off in such a small amount, and although I've heard using superglue for modelling can work, I'm still skeptical. Just sanding down the pads is an absolute no-go, as they're small enough as-is.

What would the good citizens of Dakka recommend for this project? I've tried reading some threads and blog posts about modelling substances, but they all seem to focus on larger gaps than these.

Dudeface wrote:
 Eldarain wrote:
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Made in us
Three Color Minimum





Tangentville, New Jersey

Why not just sand down the pieces so they're flat and no longer segmented?


 
   
Made in us
Drone without a Controller




Les Etats Unis

 KidCthulhu wrote:
Why not just sand down the pieces so they're flat and no longer segmented?


I considered that, but the plates are already very small. Sanding them down further would, while possible, probably just look extremely silly. I suppose I could sand them down then build back up with more putty, but that seems like it would be even more of a hassle.

Spoiler:


Here's an example of how small the ridges are. It's far less easy to manipulate than SM or Ork armor or the like.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/07 02:55:22


Dudeface wrote:
 Eldarain wrote:
Is there another game where players consistently blame each other for the failings of the creator?

If you want to get existential, life for some.
 
   
Made in us
Terminator with Assault Cannon




San Jose, CA

Vallejo plastic putty
   
Made in au
Morphing Obliterator





rAdelaide

I've never used liquid greenstuff, but I've read some poor reviews (shrinkage being a problem you have already mentioned).

to be honest I would use a tiny amount of regular greenstuff. knead it together, roll it into an ultra thin roll with your hands and then stick it into the segement gaps. Then flatten over the top until the gap and greenstuff is smooth and level.

Good luck
   
Made in gb
Been Around the Block





Miliput can be great for this. Knead a ball of miliput and make a thumb depression in the middle, drip some water into the depression and stir it around with a stiff old brush until you have a slurry. This slurry is a better version of LGS, it's stickier, sets harder and is more sandable. You might need to do a first coat, let it dry and then do a second coat, perhaps even finish with a light sanding with a nail buffer to get it perfect.
   
Made in at
Deranged Necron Destroyer





Make putty out of sprue by dissolving in plastic glue or acetone. There's a couple of youtube videos on it. Dries slow, but I've had no problems with shrinkage from it. Otherwise, milliput will work fine, maybe mixed with greenstuff for easier application.
After either option dries, you'll need to sand them a bit to get a smooth finish.
   
Made in us
Stealthy Grot Snipa





Atlanta, GA

 Flipsiders wrote:
I've recently finished assembling a squad of Tau Fire Warriors for a Kill Team, uh, kill team. The models look amazing and definitely have held up over time, with one exception: Since GW decided to go for an East Asian aesthetic, most Tau models have bizarre segmented thigh pads, up to and including the infantry. I absolutely hate these things, and since I'm not yet making a full army, I've decided it would be worth my time to try and cover them up, I'm not sure which modelling substance would be best to use here.

For context, the gaps on Fire Warrior kneepads are about .05mm deep and 0.5mm thick, perhaps less. I'm looking for any modelling substance that would cover up these lines without adding too much bulk to the thigh armor. Right now, I'm considering either using Liquid Green Stuff or just a hearty application of superglue, but I'm worried that LGS would just shrink and fall off in such a small amount, and although I've heard using superglue for modelling can work, I'm still skeptical. Just sanding down the pads is an absolute no-go, as they're small enough as-is.

What would the good citizens of Dakka recommend for this project? I've tried reading some threads and blog posts about modelling substances, but they all seem to focus on larger gaps than these.


Apoxie Sculpt might fit the bill. It's a two part modeling compound that you mix in equal portions much like green stuff, but it cures hard and is sandable. You should be able to fill in all those lines and then sand them down once cured.
   
Made in ca
Regular Dakkanaut





Oh Canada!

Seconding Milliput. It's sandable, so you can achieve a 100% smooth surface with just a touch of sanding, unlike plastic putty, LGS, or regular green stuff which cures rubbery.

Apply immediately after mixing while it's the stickiest. Use water to smooth and keep your fingers from getting gummed up. Silicone paint shapers can also be helpful.
   
Made in gb
Esteemed Veteran Space Marine






Northumberland, England

Mr. Surfacer 500 (Or 1000, 1500).

It's essentially the same as Vallejo's plastic putty (as Racerguy180 has suggested), and it's designed for this sort of application - or to be exact, it's designed to fill aircraft kit seams. It's low shrinkage, it's liquid (As in, actual liquid and not Liquid greenstuff gummy gak), it drys hard and being acetone based it melts into the plastic so it won't pop out with a shock. And it can be sanded down as smooth as the plastic of the model (The 500, 1000, 1500 refers to grades of fine-ness, but 500 is ample).

To apply, just use the end of a toothpick for fin control and dab it into place along the panel lines.

Honestly cannot recommend anything which would be better suited

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Made in ca
Regular Dakkanaut





Oh Canada!

 Warpig1815 wrote:
Mr. Surfacer 500 (Or 1000, 1500).

What's the difference between the numbers? I've never tried this product but it sounds useful.
   
Made in gb
Esteemed Veteran Space Marine






Northumberland, England

Warpig1815 wrote: And it can be sanded down as smooth as the plastic of the model (The 500, 1000, 1500 refers to grades of fine-ness, but 500 is ample).




It's just an indication of how smooth you can sand it to, corresponding to grits on sandpaper. But really I've found that 500 is smooth enough to mimic plastic. If I recall correctly (and DON'T quote me if it ruins your airbrush), the finer grades can also be used as a primer. But take that with a big ol' barrel of salt! I only use it as a filler, and I can't read off the advice on the pot for you, as my knowledge of Japanese Kanji is non-existent

Into the Fires of Battle! Unto the Anvil of War!

Now with 100% more blog: 'Beyond the Wall'

Numine Et Arcu
 
   
Made in se
Fresh-Faced New User



Sweden

Magic sculpt for sure
I used it for various models (ships, armoured vehicles and 30/40k). It’s much better than any green stuff imo.

Ebrion is a master but give this (or any other of his videos) a few minutes and you will see the potential of magic sculpt (=

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=n-wXBhLD-BE
   
Made in us
Primered White




Pittsburgh, PA

Sprue putty or dissolved miliput is the way to go. You can dissolve miliput with alcohol and paint it in the gaps to fill them in then you can sand it until smooth. There is a video by Marco Frisoni (not just mecha) that shows you how to do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EY8Acdi59M0

The dissolved miliput is at about the 5 minute mark but the whole video is very good.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/08 13:57:06


 
   
Made in fi
Dakka Veteran





Racerguy180 wrote:
Vallejo plastic putty


This 100%.

Vallejo Plastic Putty can be applied straight from the tube. Squeeze some putty directly into gap you want to fill and wipe away the excess with moist clay shaper or finger. It does shrink a little bit (but not nearly as much as Liquid Green Stuff) so second application is sometimes needed.

I have used Vallejo Plastic Putty to fill gaps on Nighthaunt, greater daemons, Mega-Gargants and Cursed City models to name but a few and it is by far the easiest gap filler to use.

That place is the harsh dark future far left with only war left. 
   
Made in ca
Regular Dakkanaut





Oh Canada!

I've had nothing but grief with Vallejo plastic putty. It didn't stick well, it was gritty, attempting to sand it ended up pulling out pieces, and it shrank significantly. The only "good" thing about it was it doesn't require two-part mixing before application, and that in no way counterbalanced its poor performance.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/08 20:01:54


 
   
Made in gb
Rotting Sorcerer of Nurgle





Portsmouth UK

I'd use milliput. roll out until you have a very thin sausage then place across the groove. smooth down using a colour shaper or even a metal sculpting tool. If its only for a few models then it shouldn't take you too long.

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Made in us
Adolescent Youth with Potential





I looked at my never-to-be-painted Kill Team sprue. It's a tiny crack of a line...it's also about 5-7mm long (at the most).
I would say superglue, but that would be hard to manage unless you have a dispenser where you can utilize capillary action like a needle nozzle (maybe a couple layers). Perhaps the Gel super glue could work. Otherwise, I would use some sort of the tube-based putty--I use Tamiya basic, but there are plenty of options out there, including some listed here. You'll want to use something like an old x-acto blade to smear it into the gaps that you're after.
Using GS or Milliput or other stuff you have to mix seems like it'd be a lot more difficult to spread into the micro gap and then clean up before it sticks to you and everything else. It's not impossible though--you could just get a dab and smear the small blob across each leg and then clean up the oversmear as best you can and sand off the rest if it makes a weird lump post-basecoat.
   
Made in gb
Wrathful Warlord Titan Commander






London

I read in an Airfix mag that superglue mixed with either baby powder or sodium bicarb can be used as a filler material. As to the ratios or technique I have no idea but might be worth looking into.

Failing that I strongly recommend Vallejo plastic putty.

   
Made in us
Sneaky Chameleon Skink





Baking soda, aka sodium bicarbonate, acts as an accelerator for superglue and instantly causes it to harden and cure. The superglue underneath, however, stays uncured so I would not recommend it. As soon as you go to sand or file it, you will find more uncured superglue.

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