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Made in nl
Never Forget Isstvan!





The Netherlands

Wow, thanks for the response!

Two things:

(1) Printing company:
I've heard really good stories about microRP, the only problem for you would be that they are located in Germany, which might make transport and taxes a bit tricky.

(2) Cleaning of the model:
Sounds very elaborate! I've heard many stories about using toothbrushes with some soap and warm water. What are your experiences with that?

The Wars of Tusculum Nova - A Vanguard Miniatures fanblog 
   
Made in us
Jinking Ravenwing Land Speeder Pilot





Pittsburgh PA, USA

Your work is amazing! if you ever decide to make a loyalist version... all of my tanks would be receiving upgrades

Angels of Vengeance P&M Blog

A Tale of 5 Gamers!

Blood Knights Kill Team P&M

Crusade of Vengeance - A Tale of Sacrifce and Brotherhood
www..com/dakkaforum/posts/list/545145.page 
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

A larger update to talk more about surface quality is planned, now that I have a broader selection of cast parts in hand. Even with these parts, it's hard to say what the final results will be with a few layers of paint. But until then, I'm so pleased with how the Chaos Rapier is turning out, I just wanted to leave this right here...


Initial production results of the Ectoplasma Cannon have proven to be very positive; manufacture may commence.

There's still one small complication in manufacturing the chassis on this kit that's causing some minor flaws, but I'll elaborate on that when I have more time and pictures to explain properly. Some honest feedback will be appreciated.

"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in us
Purposeful Hammerhead Pilot





Anacoco, Louisiana

Why don't you send a few of those to me? I can test painting and tabletop wear...
   
Made in us
Near Golden Daemon Caliber





Affton, MO. USA

It looks great , the only thing I see that I'm not 100 % sure of is how far the gun barrel sticks out. I'm sure the female space marines enjoy that, but it looks a little odd that the gun shield doesn't cover the gun. I realize it's to protect the crew, so it's more of just a personal opinion, which probably would not stop me from getting some when I get back to chaos marines.

LOL, Theo your mind is an amazing place, never change.-camkierhi 9/19/13
I cant believe theo is right.. damn. -comradepanda 9/26/13
None of the strange ideas we had about you involved your sexual orientation..........-Monkeytroll 12/10/13

I'd put you on ignore for that comment, if I could...Alpharius 2/11/14 
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

If you didn't like the length of the Plasma Cannon barrel, well the Beamer might be too much ; in reality, the weapons take their proportions from the official model but thanks for the input either way. Thanks, as always, for all the kind words and positive feedback; I really wouldn't be where I am without the energy I get from Legion Rising. There's so much I want to write about, but still much to do. So I'll just leave this here for now...


Initial production samples have passed inspection. Assembly lines for the Conversion Beamer are now operational. Praise be to the Dark Mechanicus!

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2015/09/02 09:07:45


"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in us
Purposeful Hammerhead Pilot





Anacoco, Louisiana

Mmmyes.
   
Made in us
Jinking Ravenwing Land Speeder Pilot





Pittsburgh PA, USA

That looks fantastic!

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Made in us
Liche Priest Hierophant






Is soo pretty. You should give one to BossFearless, so that he can make the barrel spin.

GENERATION 8: The first time you see this, copy and paste it into your sig and add 1 to the number after generation. Consider it a social experiment.

If yer an Ork, why dont ya WAAAGH!!

M.A.V.- if you liked ChromeHounds, drop by the site and give it a go. Or check out my M.A.V. Oneshots videos on YouTube! 
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

Ok then, I’ve been out of the studio for most of the weekend so I haven’t been able to do anything hands-on; but I’ve had a computer, lots of prepared photographs, and some time in the evenings to be able to write. So, I’m going to do a few articles and some general musings about various things. In fact, I’ve been asked several questions in various corners of the interweb, and had so many comments I’d like to reply to, that I’m just going to ramble and comment/answer to everything across said articles.

First up, a little hobby how-to; I was asked recently if I could take a photo of my pressure chamber and vacuum chamber setup that I use for casting, and I figured I could do one better. Recently I put together a new pressure chamber and was aware enough to remember to take progression photos of the process so I could show the steps involved.

However, before I get started, I just want to remind people that this device can be extremely dangerous if not properly assembled and no shortcuts should be taken when building something like this. If you do not have the correct tools/parts on-hand to do this kind of project properly, do not attempt this! During my research I’ve seen examples online that are essentially bombs waiting to go off, because people try to make due with improvised solutions to problems. Do this right, or just don’t do it. Pressure is a tool, and some tools can be dangerous if you don not show proper care and respect.



A ‘Power Fist’ (Gotta’ love that brand name) brand Paint Pressure Tank along with various fittings that will be used during assembly.

In Canada our equivalent to Harbour Freight is called Princess Auto, and that is where I purchased the Paint Pressure Pot that I used for this assembly; this tank has the added benefit of including a 1/4” hose and a 3/8” hose along with pictured pressure regulator. This is definitely a ‘made in China’ product in quality, but its job is simple so that’s not a huge deal. Notice that this tank has a working pressure of 50psi and a max pressure of 80psi; it is highly recommended to stay within the working pressure range of any tank you use. With hoses included you only need a selection of NPT (National Pipe Threads) to complete the assembly; note that NPT fittings are used because they are tapered and become air-tight as they tighten down. The selection of fittings shown here is more than I used in this assembly, but what is required might be different depending on the Paint Pressure Tank used.

One key pair of parts to note are the valves; be sure to get good quality high pressure ball valves. Lesser valves will struggle of hold the kinds of pressures that will be used. These valves are rated for 600psi, so they will do the trick.



First up, the Regulator needs some modification before it’s ready for its new life pressurizing curing plastics.

This Paint Pressure Tank splits the compressed air between the tank and the hose used to spray the paint, and that won’t be needed for its new life. First I remove the connector for the secondary hose and replace it with a brass plug. Note that I have secured the regulator in a vice to keep it secure during the removal of the connector; all of the pieces are secured very well at the factory and you want to keep those seals enacted if you can.

I use LokTite 242 to secure the fittings. The product is intended to secure nuts and bolts so they don’t loosen due to things like vibration, but it also works well to seal the joins airtight as well. You’ll want to be liberal and add a fair amount to the threads to ensure a good seal; once you’re done fastening the pieces in place some extra LocTite oozing out of the join will be a good sign that you’ll get a good seal.



Now one of the valves needs to be added to the regulator to control in compressed air input.

With the provided fittings in place, it’s a simple matter of adding the valve, and then adding a male quick-release fitting for connecting the hose. With that the regulator is ready to go.


How everything attaches to the chamber will be key; clearance must be considered so that the closing clamps can work as intended.

In this case I wanted to point the exhaust vent upward to keep it as compact as possible, so I simply added a 90 degree elbow to the provided fitting before adding the second ball valve. A top-down photo shows the kind of layout you’re looking for; reasonably balanced in weight and with good clearance for the closing clamps. A thick pad of cloth is secured over the valve to reduce the harshness of the sound when the pressure is released.


Two final simple steps completes the transformation from Paint Pressure Tank to a Casting Pressure Chamber, from boring to downright sophisticated.

This first step I really should have done before attaching any hardware to the lid; it’s much easier to do when there is less bulk on the top of the lid to deal with, but I overlooked it in the rush to get the hardware together. Put simply, you need to remove the pipe that would originally be used to feed paint from the tank to the spray hose. By hand, I was unable to break the seal they archived on this pipe to properly remove it, so I used a rotary tool with a cut-off wheel to chop it off.

A final step is to add a 90 degree elbow fitting to the vent that will direct the pressurized air into the tank. The air will be entering the tank as such high speed that any exposed liquids (in the form of uncured resin or rubber) could splatter and spray. The likelihood of this being a large problem very often is small, but it doesn’t take much to direct the air towards the wall of the chamber to it can be deflected as it enters.

In the end this 50psi pressure chamber cost about $200 CAD to put together including all of the fittings, valves, shipping, and taxes. Not exactly cheap, but not over-the-top expensive either and more than enough to have a profound impact on the quality of casting a hobbyist might be doing. In comparison, and because I was asked about both my Pressure and Vacuum setup, these are the other contraptions I use in my humble studio.



To the left a Rotokinetics Vacuum Chamber and beside it is a Casting Pressure Chamber rated for 80psi; plus a photo of all of the misfits in a row.

Vacuum Pumps are expensive, so to start I choose it purchase a Vacuum Chamber that has a solid-state vacuum pump that is driven with compressed air; this chamber lets my compressor do double duty powering both pressure and vacuum processes. While I strongly feel that pressure is a better first step for someone looking to improving casting quality, adding vacuum to the mix can really improve casting further.

Note the difference in build quality of the 80psi Pressure Chamber that I put together; this is a made in the USA product and it shows, but it also cost more than double to build than the 50psi chamber. The additional 30psi does have a modest impact on further reducing bubbles in casting, so I use this chamber as much as I can for high detail objects, and it has me wanting to put together a chamber that can handle 120+psi just to see how far it can be taken. At this point most of the bubbles I deal with are so small that I don’t think much more than 120psi would be needed to get near perfect casts almost all of the time. But for now I can make excellent progress with I’ve managed to assemble so far.

On a related side note, pressurizing the rubber for moulds during curing will have the same bubble eliminating effect (I very good thing) but anything over 40psi should yield the same results; bubbles in mould rubber appear to get ‘absorbed’ more readily than in resin.

And with that I’ll say, stay tuned for some studio transparency and another look onto my workbench. While there are many things working out well, I have come into a few snags that will impact quality in some rare cases, and a few issues that will require redesign and/or reprinting that will cause a few delays. Initial stocks of the Chaos Rapier (new name to be determined shortly) are ready, but I want to get some honest feedback from the people that really matter regarding some of the final small issues I’ve run into.

Keep the radio of your PipBoy tuned to this station, and Please Stand By…

(Fallout 4, when you arrive, you will ruin my life for a short while)


"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in us
Mutated Chosen Chaos Marine





Thanks for the insight to your process. It almost looks like it could be in realm of possible for my meager skills. Will you be selling the Rapier weapons separately? I just picked up some kataphron tracks to convert but am still looking for decent mountable weapons. Those conversion beamers are stunning.

Help me, Rhonda. HA! 
   
Made in ca
Boosting Ultramarine Biker





Vancouver, BC

All you need is a yellow hazmat suit and a ventilator mask and you can call yourself Heisenburg.
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

First up, more semi-random babbling about various things that have been asked or wish to comment about. Over the years I’ve made people swear at me (in a good way), deem themselves unworthy (you are, we all start somewhere – build something!), call me crazy (in a good way), and otherwise give me very positive feedback to what I can do. I always contended that I prefer the term eccentric, since it makes me sound interesting and wealthy but I do recognize that it takes a certain kind of ‘unique’ to do what I do. I’m glad the designs I come up with resonate with people, and I really do appreciate the great feedback and input; it’s a conscious effort that I try to follow a design language with the work I’m creating and I’m glad it shows.

While I finished several great kits this summer, (more still working their way through production) there were several others that I couldn’t get to as planned. To those who were interested in seeing bulk trims, the Jetbike, and the Storm Raven extension, in particular, know that they are on deck and I’m going to do my best to try and get progress on them as time permits. As usual, this is also only the beginning but I’m still learning much as I go; now that I’ve had a taste of digital creation and have a better understanding of what to expect I plan on doing so… much… more… Stay tuned.

This extends to Loyalist kits and ultimately other factions. While Chaos will always be my first calling and be the primary focus of my studio while I gain momentum, Loyalist kits will increase considerably over the coming months and years. I hope to branch into other races once I’m done with college and turn my focus to really pushing the studio to the next level. This could mean kits by my own hand and/or work done by commission or collaboration with other talented individuals. But that’s still a way off, and another story for another time.

It’s been mentioned a few times that Forge World should give me a job, but unless I move to London I don’t think that will be happening anytime soon; it’s my understanding everything is designed and prototyped in-house in London. I understand that it’s usually meant as a joke, or only semi-serious, but there is a part of me that would really enjoy being able to do work that is ‘official’. I think GW is cutting themselves off from a world of talent and maybe when I’m done college there’s some way I could make them see that. Wishful thinking? More than likely, but nothing ventured, nothing gained. The down side of actually achieving official status could very well be loss of creative control, so there is another side that reminds that sometimes you need to be careful what you wish for. Well, I’ve rambled enough, so let’s get to the meat of this post; the good, the bad, and the ugly (as it were) of where I’m at today.



Shapeways knows how to pack an order, that’s for sure.

When the box arrive I though there must be some kind of mistake, it seemed far too large for my order. I had ordered several pieces, but they were mostly very small. Once I started digging in I found they had individually wrapped each-and-every piece, no matter the size.


The Frosted Extreme Detail print process from Shapeways comes with a few technical considerations when being used to make casting prototypes.

The first I’ve already spoken about; where the wax that is used to support the object during printing comes in contact with the object, there is a noticeable ‘frost’ as the name suggests. On most surfaces and locations it’s actually not that bad and seems subtle enough to vanish under paint. The second is a very noticeable layering on two opposing sides of any object that is most pronounced on sheer vertical surfaces; this seems to be some limitation of the print process and most noticeable on flat vertical surfaces. When the surface has a grade or a curve the problem becomes much more reduced and becomes reasonable, but it is quite strange. What I have also noticed is that surfaces that suffer from this and also come in contact with the wax will get a much coarser ‘frost’ that benefits from being gently sanded to refine and improve the finish.

Finally, the material is very hard and tough; scraping with tools and scrubbing with a steel wire brush does no damage but cleans the surface well. However, it is reasonably brittle. While it will hold up well to being scrubbed and sanded to refine the surface, dropping an item on a hard floor will many times cause items to break. Case and point, the poor barrels for the Auto Cannon unfortunately fell and were ruined. I couldn’t believe it when it happened; they are reasonably small and you would think they wouldn’t hit with such force. A replacement will be printed, but it is going to delay the release of this weapon system. All weapons will be offered separately, so these will be available in the near future once a replacement arrives. A few other parts will require a redesign (more on that in a moment) and thus a reprint, so this will be joining them.



Notoriously difficult to photograph, here I’ve tried to show the frosting at its worse.

It effected the missile racks so badly that it made me actually come up with a far superior design that should solve my original problem (mould rubber around the edge of the missiles in tubes is so delicate that it wears out very quickly – the ‘frosting’ texture would only make that worse) and make the moulds last much longer, but also make a more versatile kit. Instead of making it on one piece I’ll do the missiles as a layer, and then a keyed plate with holes in it will be placed over. The way the launcher assembles will make the join all but invisible, and it will make it easy to remove a few missiles to simulate a weapon that has fired some of its payload. This change has delayed the new Havoc Launchers, but the final kits will improved for it

Center you can see the bad kind of ‘frosting’ on a flat surface straight from Shapeways, and you can see it actually glitters it is so coarse. To the right that surface has been scrubbed with a wire brush and washed; while the surface is improved and very smooth, it is also quite rough with a noticeable coarseness under the fingernail. On broad flat surfaces like this a simple sanding and filing will quickly make the surface acceptable. If there is more detail it naturally becomes more work.



While it does look interesting in the mould rubber, the translucent nature of the material is actually quite frustrating.

Not really understanding just how much of an impact the ‘frosting’ would have on my processes I tried to make moulds as with my own prototypes. This quickly turned bad as the moulds were prone to tearing during de-moulding of the prototype. Not being able to get a good idea what the surface was like came back to haunt the first cast; the quality was just not good enough. The top layer of banding in the far right shows the coarse layering and how badly it can effect a surface. Below are surfaces that have been ‘frosted’ with the wax support material; again, it was just a bit too rough to be acceptable. So, while the mould being torn wasn’t a good thing, it gave me an opportunity to clean things up before trying again.


Ok, let’s get to the one issue I’m having with the Rapier Platform. It’s driving me nuts.

Put simply, The edges of the tracks are being beyond stubborn, and it’s really annoying when every other part of the kit is casting so perfectly. And I do mean every part. Everything I’ve tried with the current mould will not remove the last couple of bubbles on the track. So, in my usual effort for transparency I’m just giving an idea of the minor flaws that will be unavoidable in these kits while I get a different mould setup to try another idea.


The flaws are minor on an assembled platform, and I’m sure I can hear people yelling to not worry about it and get the damn kits up for sale!

But, you wouldn’t like the kits I make if I wasn’t as particular as I am. After everything I’ve tried to eliminate these flaws I’ve just learned to accept them for now. While I have only planned on these three weapon systems originally, I can’t see why I couldn’t also do other weapons over time. I can’t promise a time line, but I can say it’s possible at some point.

For now, these prototypes need to start returning on their investment so I can start doing more! These will be up for sale in the next day or so, along with the Siege Ram for the Land Raider. The Chaos Rapier chassis and weapons will be sold separately so you can have a choice to have them individually for projects or together as built by the studio. Other kits will start appearing as I work out final issues and get replacement parts. The smaller bits will start turning up once the larger kits have been sorted and can start generating some capitol to invest in more rubber and plastic. They are great little bits, but they need to wait while the large kits get finished.

Thanks as always for reading, and I look forward to do much more in future. For now, my classes will be starting soon so studio time will again become very limited. But with the new tools at my disposal that continue to grow and develop, there will always be something in the works. Please Stand By…


"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in nl
Never Forget Isstvan!





The Netherlands

By the way, some more discussions and tips on how to handle Shapeways' FUD/FXD: http://www.tacticalwargames.net/taccmd/viewtopic.php?f=126&t=30285

The Wars of Tusculum Nova - A Vanguard Miniatures fanblog 
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

Thanks, as always for the positive support everyone. While not my intended update, I've got *in his best Prof. Farnsworth voice* "Good new everyone!" and I figured it wouldn't hurt to share.

Thanks again Malika, I always appreciate input. While that conversation seems more about dealing with the wax residue (an issue if you plan to paint SW prints directly) I'm more interested in improving the surface quality or avoiding poor surface quality in the first place. Since casting prototypes are usually treated with an oily release agent for the process, the oily/waxy residue from SWs process is not an issue.

Also, let me just answer some questions from another corner of the interweb... For niche models that I would have a hard time getting to, I plan to do Bulk Trim packs that provide several lengths of trim, some with a few corners, some with faction suitable motifs (arrows, blades, lightning, skulls, shields, open fields, etc., etc.), and lots of long lengths. They will require the end builder to cut the strips to length and do a little cleanup work where they meet at corners, but that seems much better then trying to scratch build it all. Trim kits for specific chassis, where it makes sense, will also continue to be designed.

The Loricatus Mk.I will be replaced. It puts me in a catch-22; it's a popular kit that I want to replace, but it also takes a considerable amount of rubber for the moulds. If I'm going to pour that much rubber, I would like to update the kit to include some of the many improvements I've made to my studio. It's going to be worth it (it'll be amazing, just wait and see) but that means it'll be more time before I can get the prototypes done. This project (and others like it) will happen; more on what I'm eluding to later. Hint: think super modular, giving the builder the freedom to mix-and-match more.



Warmaster, the production and trade negotiations of The Works have proven beneficial; our Mechanicus are pleased to have secured a Spartan battle tank, a true relic of the Long War for the Legion armoury. Reverse engineering of key subsystems has already commenced.

After dealing with most of the major expenses that the studio created over the summer, I felt it was safe to take advantage of Forge World's free shipping offer for Sept; and wouldn't you know it, the Spartan was just the right price to meet the minimum limit. One part early birthday present, one part studio investment seems like a reasonable mix.

I've had so much interest and requests for doing kits for the Spartan and Sicaran it seemed like a logical addition to the studio; I simply can't build for something without the actual model to take precise measurements and do test fitting. But, thanks to those who have offered; know that there might be a future role for people like you in my large plans - but I digress, for now.

Because I recognize the base cost of a FW model, kits for FW models in particular will focus on being more efficient. In fact, the form and level of detail on these tanks makes all but necessary to keep additions less elaborate. There just aren't the same long uninterrupted lines like the stock Land Raider and Rhino chassis. So, this will reduce the mould count, and therefor the cost of these kits. Cermite/Extra Armour and 'Dozer/Destroyer Blades are the first ideas that come to mind, but I have other voices whispering concepts all the time...

My first impression of the kit is one of sheer awe; in both raw mass and level of detail, the Spartan delivers. While the Sicaran and Fire Raptor are both amazing looking kits there are issues and elements with both (build fit issues mostly, but some details) that don't appear to be the same with the Spartan. I won't know until I actually assemble it, but it appears to have a much cleaner fit and less warping than any other large FW kit I've received. The details are also just a bit more refined and polished all around; nothing that makes other kits inferior, but it just seems like whoever make the prototype really did it right and took their time.

It will also be effective as a lethal weapon for home defense once assembled; each of the side chassis components that mount the tracks are a massive solid block of resin. The fact that they were able to do a piece so large without it warping in some way is impressive in of itself. For as large and bulky as it is, the footprint of the tank (without the center hull that adds the 'beak') is surprisingly close to that of a stock Land Raider. Naturally, I will document the building of this when it starts. I've already done the same for the Fire Raptor progress, so know that I've more than a few things up my sleeves for future updates.

The signal may go weak sometimes, but signal never stops...

"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






God I hope you do a loyalist platform like that.

Beautiful stuff as always.

My mostly terrain and Sons of Orar blog:
http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/568699.page#6349942
 whalemusic360 wrote:
Alph, I expect like 90 sets of orange/blue from you.
 
   
Made in us
Jinking Ravenwing Land Speeder Pilot





Pittsburgh PA, USA

i would love to see you do loyalist version, would immidiately add them to my units

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A Tale of 5 Gamers!

Blood Knights Kill Team P&M

Crusade of Vengeance - A Tale of Sacrifce and Brotherhood
www..com/dakkaforum/posts/list/545145.page 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






Every rhino needs one of these on a tow hook.


My mostly terrain and Sons of Orar blog:
http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/568699.page#6349942
 whalemusic360 wrote:
Alph, I expect like 90 sets of orange/blue from you.
 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut




Oklahoma City

Amazing thread. So much talent.
Was shown this by velvet mark.

You really inspired me! I have been hemhawinf about a laser cutter for mdf for a long time that I would like to use for styrene more but due to not wanting to be poisoned.. The zing looks like just what I have been looking for and I'm eagerly awaiting mine !


Can you elaborate on your servitor zing build? The rivets appear you embossed a dot, then flipped it over to use the extruded side or glued rivets by hand on each dot?
Was it all cut from one piece/embossed (the front face plate with eye)


Thanks for all the information! Hope you the best in all of your endeavors and please lord share some insight on the zing stuff if you can/are willing for those of us who have gotten one on account of you!

http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/472615.page#4701031 LAND HOOOOOOO! my freeboota blog (can look me up on the-waaagh and da warpath same username)... Currently in the the midst of adventure into night goblin squig cult



hi daoc friends this is beeyawnsay c: 
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

*Subtle tosses an image out from under the rock of higher education*

Sometimes, I get free choice in what I can do for a college project, and since I do so many 'consumer items' most of the time, I like to have a chance to do something unique but still relevant. This time I was aloud to do this for my Solidworks course.


At this point all I can say is... It's a solid! It's a SOLID! It turns out making a Solid Body from Surfaces is actually a little tricky. This damn helmet as been hard, but I'm starting to get it!

Unlike everything I've 3D modeled up to this point, this was done almost completely with Lofted and Swept Surfaces, not Solid Bodies. By using a Surface and then Knitting the resulting form together you can much get more control over complex forms. This helmet was created from a set of 2D drawings (Top, Side, and Front) that was extrapolated from the flat drawings. Needless to say, It's given me a respect for what surfaces can do, and being only my first try, I can already tell that with more practice I should be able to do all sorts of interesting forms. My future Jetbike project will be even better now that I have a better idea how this works.

There are a few more layers of detailing that will go on this helmet before it needs to be rendered, but I'm pleased with the progress. I'll be sure to show it again when it's even further along and/or finished. Maybe someday I'll re-scale it (it's roughly life size at this point) and have it rapid prorotyped so I can paint it as a bust. I could never sell it, but as a personal piece I could make one.

But, for now I have to put this aside while I shift focus to another project. ~21 days until Winter Break...

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2015/11/09 02:05:38


"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Enigmatic Exalted Daemon





Albany, NY

 Subtle Discord wrote:
(it's roughly life size at this point)[/size]
*meekly raises his hand*

I ... would be interested a roughly life size CSM helmet at some point in the future

Render looks solid!

- Salvage

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2015/11/09 15:05:03


INSTAGRAM: @boss_salvage 
   
Made in ca
Boosting Ultramarine Biker





Vancouver, BC

I have not read through your entire thread again but have you ever heard of Smooth On XTC-3D coating. it looks like it can be use to fill the striations.

https://youtu.be/GSKxycs3kPg
   
Made in gb
Pious Palatine






Man this is a cool thread. Great looking stuff and really interesting info about your experiences and how you work.

Thanks for sharing.

EDC
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut





IL

I've found that shapeways prints tend to have a somewhat porous surface even on areas that appear flat to the naked eye. In addition to sanding them I've found that a thin layer of primer goes a log way to help prevent the mold from tearing out when removing the master. I use an auto body primer as it's very thin compared to regular spray paint and doesn't cost too much extra. The paint helps seal all the micro holes you can't see, those holes suck in the silicone when you pressurize and it basically grabs ahold of the piece like it was super glued in place.

Surfaces that run in the same direction as the build lines are the most problematic as it has more cracks and crevices to get into and even with sanding to an apparent smooth surface the splits between the layers are usually open. The wax layering that holds printed layers together does dry out and age over time and as it does you may notice the build lines getting more noticable and the material yellowing on the outer surfaces. The first time I mold a part I try and keep a couple of the best casts to serve as back ups for my masters, the resin casts won't age or peel apart the way that the objet prints will. (which helps save needing to do any reprints)

Hopefully that can help you avoid some headache. If you are interested I have some places that I'd suggest getting prints from, they cost a bit more than shapeways but the prints are amazing and much better for casting from. They also use a full resin based process so there's no wax layer binders like the shapeways/objet prints use.

Loving your work

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2015/11/10 09:02:21


Paulson Games parts are now at:
www.RedDogMinis.com 
   
Made in us
Purposeful Hammerhead Pilot





Anacoco, Louisiana

 paulson games wrote:
I've found that shapeways prints tend to have a somewhat porous surface even on areas that appear flat to the naked eye. In addition to sanding them I've found that a thin layer of primer goes a log way to help prevent the mold from tearing out when removing the master. I use an auto body primer as it's very thin compared to regular spray paint and doesn't cost too much extra. The paint helps seal all the micro holes you can't see, those holes suck in the silicone when you pressurize and it basically grabs ahold of the piece like it was super glued in place.

Surfaces that run in the same direction as the build lines are the most problematic as it has more cracks and crevices to get into and even with sanding to an apparent smooth surface the splits between the layers are usually open. The wax layering that holds printed layers together does dry out and age over time and as it does you may notice the build lines getting more noticable and the material yellowing on the outer surfaces. The first time I mold a part I try and keep a couple of the best casts to serve as back ups for my masters, the resin casts won't age or peel apart the way that the objet prints will. (which helps save needing to do any reprints)

Hopefully that can help you avoid some headache. If you are interested I have some places that I'd suggest getting prints from, they cost a bit more than shapeways but the prints are amazing and much better for casting from. They also use a full resin based process so there's no wax layer binders like the shapeways/objet prints use.

Loving your work


I for one would like to vouch for the quality of Paulson's work. He's definitely a good guy to listen to!
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

Thanks for the input! I want to reply and talk a little, but I'm strapped for time at the moment... so, this just a note to say I'll comment once I've got more time to ramble in more depth.

"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in at
Adolescent Youth with Potential



Austria

Hi Subtle Discord!
´
Great stuff you are doing - even if it is for the Dark Gods

I was wondering if Servitor Zing did foster the cause of the Warmaster and prooved a valuable asset or if he went back to the slave pits.
In the model railroad forums I read about mixed results when using it for styrene or thicker cardboard.

Would be interesting to hear more about your experience.


   
Made in us
Martial Arts SAS






Awesome stuff !

Let no man glory in the greatness of his mind,
but rather keep watch o'er his wits.
Cautious and silent let him enter a dwelling;
to the heedful comes seldom harm,
for none can find a more faithful friend
than the wealth of mother wit.

17th in World Wide War. (1st in VPs)

Hydra Dominatus 
   
Made in ca
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun





Toronto, Canada

Fee-fi-fo-fum!



... ... ...

"The old galaxy is dying, and the new galaxy struggles to be born; now is the time of monsters."



 
   
Made in us
Purposeful Hammerhead Pilot





Anacoco, Louisiana

Ooooh ho ho ho. Now THIS is one I'm looking forward to seeing!
   
 
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