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Made in gb
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun




Bath

Im thinking of doing a thousands suns force, specifically one in the old red pre-heresy colours. I was Also thinking that instead of using standard reds ect, i would try using the GW gemstone paint for the main armour (ie paint with leadbelcher or other silver paint then with Spiritstone Red, to create a shiny, gem like armour).

has anyone tried doing this before? does it look good, or just go garish, or do the gemstone paints not work well over large surfaces like that?

Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an` Tommy, 'ow's yer soul? "
But it's " Thin red line of 'eroes " when the drums begin to roll
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it's " Thin red line of 'eroes, " when the drums begin to roll.
"Tommy", Rudyard Kipling
500pts
1000 pts
 
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut





There are other choices, green stuff world do their candy inks which might work better but it depends on the look you want. You might need to experiment with a few translucent paints, on that simulates blood might work well. They thing is with the ones from GW and GSW is that if you put metallic paint under the paint you will get a pot of the metallic pigments showing through. I think it works on gem stones because they are small but on larger areas not sure if it will give you the finish you want. This is all speculation as it’s something I haven’t tried before, have you got a pic of the effect you want
   
Made in gb
[DCM]
Procrastinator extraordinaire





Edinburgh, UK

The classic Forgeworld 1k Sons and Alpha Legion metallic schemes are classically done with Tamiya clear paints which go through an airbrush well and make a really nice gloss metallic. If you wanted a dulled metallic, I'd recommend the GW contrast paints over a metallic base to get a relatively similar effect and it can be done by brush. I haven't heard anyone use the gemstone paint I'm afraid.

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2000 Hive Fleet Zenith
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Made in us
Lieutenant General





Florence, KY



'It is a source of constant consternation that my opponents
cannot correlate their innate inferiority with their inevitable
defeat. It would seem that stupidity is as eternal as war.'

- Nemesor Zahndrekh of the Sautekh Dynasty
Overlord of the Crownworld of Gidrim
 
   
Made in gb
Homicidal Veteran Blood Angel Assault Marine





Cloud City, Bespin

I wouldnt use the gemstone paints for flat surfaces, its a sticky glaze.

Use the contrast red its much thinner and flows into the edges like a wash.

 queen_annes_revenge wrote:
Straight out if the pot, bang it on. What else is there to know?
 DV8 wrote:
Blood Angels Furioso Dreadnought should also be double-fisted.
 
   
Made in gb
Sagitarius with a Big F'in Gun




Bath

yhea, you guys are right, i can get something like what i was thinking with contrasts. I haven't really tried them, but that video tutorial seems prefect for what i was thinking (nothing new under the sun, i guess!)

thanks for the replys.

Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an` Tommy, 'ow's yer soul? "
But it's " Thin red line of 'eroes " when the drums begin to roll
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it's " Thin red line of 'eroes, " when the drums begin to roll.
"Tommy", Rudyard Kipling
500pts
1000 pts
 
   
Made in gb
Homicidal Veteran Blood Angel Assault Marine





Cloud City, Bespin

It took me a while to work it out but when used on gems and eyes it relies on being applied thickly, when it dries it goes patchy and thats what gives the marbly gem glow when the light hits.

 queen_annes_revenge wrote:
Straight out if the pot, bang it on. What else is there to know?
 DV8 wrote:
Blood Angels Furioso Dreadnought should also be double-fisted.
 
   
Made in us
Lieutenant General





Florence, KY

 Rybrook wrote:
It took me a while to work it out but when used on gems and eyes it relies on being applied thickly, when it dries it goes patchy and thats what gives the marbly gem glow when the light hits.

There's a bit of a technique to applying them as well that gives them that gemstone look:



'It is a source of constant consternation that my opponents
cannot correlate their innate inferiority with their inevitable
defeat. It would seem that stupidity is as eternal as war.'

- Nemesor Zahndrekh of the Sautekh Dynasty
Overlord of the Crownworld of Gidrim
 
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut





I just watched the Hooby Cheating video on using green stuff worlds pure gold pigment and it made me think of this post. He layers blood angels contrast over pure gold and it looks amazing and I thought it would be a great way to achieve a TS gemstone armour style. Check it out


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Hobby not hooby

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/04/10 15:08:27


 
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Abel





Washington State

That "technique" is typically called Candy Paint Job. Comes from automobile painting and "Candy Apple Red". You start with a base coat of a bright metalic, then paint a clear color over it. It's typically done with an air brush. I did something similar with my Ultramarines:





My recipe:
1. Black Primer
2. Air Brush (AB) Vallejo Gunmetal
3. AB Vallejo Silver in zenethil highlights
4. Pin wash Drakenhoff Nightshade (If this was a gloss, I'd do it after the next step, but it dries matte so I do it before the clear blue)
5. AB 3-4 layers of Tamiya Clear Blue. It's critical that you let each layer completely dry before adding the next layer. I waited 8-12 hours between layers. If you spray over a wet layer, it will texturize.
6. I hand brushed the rest of the details and decals

Can you do something similar with contrast paints? IMHO, no. I've seen it done, and it didn't look nearly as good as an air brushed clear color over a metallic. You don't get the glossy wet look unless you spray the model down with a gloss coat.You just can't prevent the pooling of the contrast paint on a large surface.

Kara Sloan shoots through Time and Design Space for a Negative Play Experience  
   
Made in gb
Regular Dakkanaut




Lincoln, UK

GW also hase a range of Clear colours as part of their Air paints range - Mirtarion Green Clear, Angron Red Clear and so on.

In my experience, they're a bit more straightforward to use than the Tamiya Clear range. Airbrush only, as they don't brush on evenly.

The base colour for a really rich, bright candy red should be gold rather than silver, which is more for blues etc.

You can also tinker with different clear coloursto change tones - purple and blue on clear red, green and purple on clear blue.
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut





Yes this candy style is what vince does in the video but I think it addresses the OP question because of the gold under the red.

Also the ease of which the effect is achieved is impressive, no airbrush needed
   
Made in at
Deranged Necron Destroyer





I use tamiya clear blue on my van saar and clear red on my tempestus (gold base), applied by brush. It's a bit tricky to start with but once you get used to it it looks great.
Make sure you use their thinner. I add it straight to the pot, usually to the bottom of the threaded part, but you can play with that until you're happy with the consistency.
Before painting, mix with a stirring stick. Just shaking it, even with agitators, doesn't do enough in my opinion.
When painting with it, make sure the brush is very lightly damp. The paint dries quickly on the brush and turns into a sticky mess if on there too long. However, it washes out quite well with water, so swirl the brush in your pot after each go to get any remaining paint in the bristles.
I usually need two coats for good coverage and a good effect, and then top it with a gloss varnish. Watch out, certain kinds of varnish dissolve this paint (AK, I think).
   
 
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