Switch Theme:

Accepting and Interacting with your Hobby  [RSS] Share on facebook Share on Twitter Submit to Reddit
»
Author Message
Advert


Forum adverts like this one are shown to any user who is not logged in. Join us by filling out a tiny 3 field form and you will get your own, free, dakka user account which gives a good range of benefits to you:
  • No adverts like this in the forums anymore.
  • Times and dates in your local timezone.
  • Full tracking of what you have read so you can skip to your first unread post, easily see what has changed since you last logged in, and easily see what is new at a glance.
  • Email notifications for threads you want to watch closely.
  • Being a part of the oldest wargaming community on the net.
If you are already a member then feel free to login now.




Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut




Miss please delete. Editing issue. :(

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2020/09/19 16:59:11


greatest band in the universe: machine supremacy

"Punch your fist in the air and hold your Gameboy aloft like the warrior you are" 
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut




Overread wrote:I don't think there's anything wrong with GW making the game so that it can work for random pick-up games and that can work and play to those strengths - things like the warcry setup cards which can let two people who are total strangers get started and playing very quicky, these are great things.
.


Yes, bit terms and conditions are attached. Random pick up games with strangers should be viewed as the lowest common denominator. It's pragmatism at all costs. There is so much scope for match up issues, especially combined with 'list building for advantage' and 'blind, independent list building'. Nothing wrong with it, but a lot of things need get sacrificed on the altar to allow said pragmatism to function well. Like striking up a conversation with a stranger in a bar, you need to realise you can only expect so much and there will probably be a lot of friction and areas where there is nothing in common and conversation will just die. Totally different dynamic than me meeting Mrs.deadnight for a few pints.

Nurglitch wrote:Your point about GW requiring active player ownership of the Hobby in order to make it a playable game isn't missed. The thing is that there's a much larger hobby out there called 'board games' where people dig out a box, read the rules, and kinda get on with it just fine.


True, bit board games tend to be smaller, more limited systems. Let's be clear - in some ways this can be a good thing. It allows them.to be more focused. They work fine, but it's easier to work with and balance something where there's two factions, each of four units and a drastically smaller scale and scope. 40k is vast by comparison. Now if you want to axe 99% of 40k's scale, scope, variety and content to board game it, then that's fine but a lot of people won't exactly be happy.


 IronSlug wrote:

On this last subject, I'd also like to point out that genuily loving something doesn't prevent you to criticize it. On the contrary, I actually think that the idea of just accepting everything as delivered to you (because vote with your wallet) is a as much passive and noxious stance that the contrary. Reasonable criticism is not only sane but indispensable to the health of a hobby. And let's be honnest, GW is criticizable, I mean what human made thing isn't?


I tend to agree. It's fine to criticize, but when everything is a criticism, and when every nod of approval is given grudgingly, with incredible reluxtance, and often snark, that's not healthy. Too often you see black Knights descend like vultures against anyone expressing even the tiniest hint of positivity or DIY, often times more angry or incredulous at the fact that people are doing stuff themselves, or people like me aren't as apoplectic with rage as they are. Tbf the white knights are just as bad.

Like anything, criticism needs to be controlled. Uncontrolled venting ultimately hurts you more. If I turned on my wife and unleashed the equivalent of the criticisms here, or the attitudes and intent behind those criticisms against her, she'd have me out on my arse quicker than I can type this sentence.

 IronSlug wrote:

But when your hobby consists mostly of raging and not even directed to the people that really have a say in it, when you still play and every game leaves a sour taste in your mouth, when you almost come to feel hate for the company producing your hobby like some seems to feel (but then again, internet...). Yeah, you're hurting yourself and the hobby you used to love, so just take a break.


I speak from experience. I've been there. When you hit that point of burnout, walk away, take a break. I've seen too many people struggle past the point of burnout, sometimes for years after the point, and all it did was was hurt them.

 IronSlug wrote:

On the other hand I realize it is easy to say for someone for who the hobby is just a side thing. It must be hard when you've invested so much into something, and I don't speak only of money or time, but how much you've invested of yourself. At some point, it becomes part of who you are, one of the adjective that defines you. Sometime the main one. It's something you spend a lot of time thinking about, that concurs to your self esteem, that you share with the people you hang out with. Sometime the only reason why you hang out with them. So breaking up from that is breaking up from a part of you and a community, and it rarely feels good at first. Bt passing some time, it (may) get better.


Again, I've experienced this first hand. It's so true. Growing up I was fairly isolated. And definitely the only geek for miles. 40k kind of became an identity for me. It was my hobby, it consumed my thoughts, it was what I marked on my calendar as things to look forward to. I got very wrapped up in it to the point of self destruction. There was other stuff going on (last year in uni etc which piled on the pressure) but it put me into a toxic slump. Worst thing is I fed it myself. Thankfully I recognised it and wanted to change. Which was hard, since so much of who I was was wrapped up in this one 'thing'. I had to walk away from the hobby entirely. I had to walk away from that group of friends, which left me even more isolated. But for all the isolation I was in a healthier place. I found other interests and other friends outside of the gaming bubble. So when the urge to dive back in came back I had a far healthier and more mature approach to it. When gaming is a smaller aspect of your whole, and when you have other interests, you can put it aside more and you find yourself in a position where these things just don't bother you as much. Honestly I'm glad I learned this lesson.

greatest band in the universe: machine supremacy

"Punch your fist in the air and hold your Gameboy aloft like the warrior you are" 
   
Made in us
Napoleonics Obsesser




MN

 Overread wrote:
I don't think there's anything wrong with GW making the game so that it can work for random pick-up games and that can work and play to those strengths - things like the warcry setup cards which can let two people who are total strangers get started and playing very quickly, these are great things.


I agree there is nothing wrong with it. As a company I would be promoting the heck out of that idea too.

However, long term a relationship based on one dimension can not last. It needs to become multi-dimensional or it goes nowhere.

Do you like Free Wargames?
http://bloodandspectacles.blogspot.com/ 
   
Made in us
Nimble Skeleton Charioteer





Can I get a TL;DR?
   
Made in gb
Decrepit Dakkanaut




UK

 Phobos wrote:
Can I get a TL;DR?


See that just makes me want to summarise with an even longer post!

I mean its not that long a post to read really.

But if you want the shorthand - repeat interactions by a person reinforces the attitude they present. If you present continual negative connections then you reinforce your own negative attitude which in turn takes away the fun from your hobby. If you present continual positive interactions with the community then you reinforce your own enjoyment, enhancing your own enjoyment of the hobby.


One is a net loss for yourself the other is a net gain. The other important thing is to understand that positive interactions don't mean ignoring issues/problems; it means approaching them from a different angle. It also means accepting some issues and, rather than repeating them continually, you focus instead on the positive angles more so. You accept the problems and don't let them dominate your attitude and interactions



The best thing is that positive interactions from yourself not only reinforces you own enjoyment, but that of others in the community.
The worst thing is that continual negative interactions from yourself no only reinforces it and diminishes your own enjoyment, but it also can have the same impact on the community as well.









   
Made in us
Fresh-Faced New User




 Overread wrote:
This is my camera, I've spent more on this than many people will spend on one 40K/AoS army


The way this post starts makes me want to quit the hobby. Posts like this prevent me from getting out into the greater hobby community.

You make it harder for me to accept the hobby.

This is me interacting with the hobby.
   
Made in us
Combat Jumping Ragik






Beyond the Beltway

 Phobos wrote:
Can I get a TL;DR?
TL;DR You get what you give.

Can't make it any shorter.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2020/10/03 08:00:46


 
   
Made in gb
Decrepit Dakkanaut




UK

smelly bohab wrote:
 Overread wrote:
This is my camera, I've spent more on this than many people will spend on one 40K/AoS army


The way this post starts makes me want to quit the hobby. Posts like this prevent me from getting out into the greater hobby community.

You make it harder for me to accept the hobby.

This is me interacting with the hobby.


Why? Because someone can spend more on another hobby than on warhammer?

   
 
Forum Index » Dakka Discussions
Go to: