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Made in us
[MOD]
Solahma






RVA

I shamelessly threadjacked reds8n's legitimate thread and so am restarting it here while moving his original one to 40k Background where it now belongs.
reds8n wrote: We'll start off with a nice little interview with Mr. McNeill.

from http://civilian-reader.blogspot.com/2011/05/interview-with-graham-mcneill.html

The first author writing for Black Library to feature on the New York Times bestseller list (with the superb A Thousand Sons), Graham McNeill is also one of their most prolific writers, penning tales of action, adventure and depth set in both the Warhammer and WH40k universes (and elsewhere, but his Black Library releases are where I know him from best).

This year sees the release of a clutch of novels by him, so I was delighted that he took the time to answer some questions about his novels, writing, synaptic Brownian motion, and more.

First, some questions about your various series for Black Library, which I’ll deal with individually if that’s OK.

Your Horus Heresy novel A Thousand Sons was Black Library’s first New York Times Bestseller. Your fifth Horus Heresy novel, The Outcast Dead, will be released in November 2011. What’s it like working on such a large, momentous project, from so many different perspectives, and what can we expect from The Outcast Dead?

It’s like getting to play with all the biggest toys in the biggest toy store. It’s something I have to remind myself every now and then what a big deal it is. You start each one in a vague state of terror, knowing the level of scrutiny each book’s going to undergo, but I find that helpful, as it drives me to make it the best I can make it. I mean, I do that for all my books, but for a Heresy novel, I need to dig deeper and find more in me to really push it to be something special. It’s always a kind of draining process, as the perfectionist in me won’t settle for anything less than the best of my best.

And given the company of authors (is that the right collective term for authors?) in the Heresy stable, no-one wants to be the weak link in the chain. We work together to make sure there’s a level of continuity between the books, and I’ll always look for the character, event or other nugget from another book to reference in mine, whether it’s from a book I’ve already written or one of my compadres’. It’s something we consciously try and achieve, weaving that connective tissue into the books that binds them more closely together, so that they read like living, breathing worlds, where events in each book matter, where events don’t happen in isolation and each is part of a larger puzzle, not jut the stepping stone to the next.

The Outcast Dead is going well, and the action has well and truly kicked off, so I think people are going to enjoy it. It’s a change of pace from the last few Astartes-themed books, taking the action back a notch to Terra and the little-understood City of Sight. This is where the Imperium’s Astropaths are based, and we gain an insight into what the life of an Astropath is like, and how the events of the Heresy are affecting them. Events of galactic magnitude have some far reaching consequences for telepaths, and there’s going to be a few upsets along the way…

Does the “New York Times Bestseller” title ever make you nervous? Do you think the success of the Horus Heresy series will have an impact on how tie-in fiction is perceived more widely?

Nervous? No, should it? I think it’s a great title, and one which I encourage everyone who meets me to greet me by! It’s a great tag to put on a book, and it’s a real achievement to have written a book that’s been so well-received, but that just means the next one’s got to be even better… I think when people see that books like this are cracking the NYT bestseller lists, they might give them more credence and appreciate that they’re great books in their own right, that they’re not just for fans of Games Workshop. It’s an attitude that’s being challenged by writers from ‘mainstream fantasy’ (if that isn’t an oxymoron, I don’t know what is…) dipping into the waters of tie in fiction. Just last week, I watched an episode of Doctor Who written by Neil Gaiman, and isn’t someone like Joss Whedon or Kevin Smith writing extended runs of Astonishing X-Men and Daredevil the same thing? If folk like that are joining the ranks of those who’re writing tie-in fiction, then I think it has to be taken seriously.

Your longest running series for Black Library focuses on Captain Uriel Ventris of the Ultramarines. The series’ sixth novel, The Chapter’s Due, will be released in paperback this June. How does it build on the series thus far, and where do you see the series going in the future?

The Chapter’s Due was the ‘series finale’ to the second arc of books, so it was always going to be a biggie. When I first started the Ultramarines books, I just kind of wrote them in isolation, one book having only minimal impact on the other, and the first three are pretty much standalone.

But with the second arc, I wanted to tell a single story broken into three parts, each of which built in scale from the last. So, with The Killing Ground, it’s just Uriel and Pasanius; in Courage and Honour, it’s them and the 4th Company at war; and in The Chapter’s Due, it’s the entire Ultramarines Chapter that gets into battle. And that was great fun to do, using the big boys from the Codex and dragging entire companies into battle. It’s a fitting capstone to the second arc of stories, and sows the seeds for a number of other storylines that are going to play out in the third arc (and possibly fourth…). Seeds of corruption, burgeoning ambition, miraculous rebirth and a revelation that might match some we’ve uncovered in the Horus Heresy series for its scale…

Moving to Warhammer... You wrote the Sigmar trilogy for Black Library’s Time of Legends series (the second of which, Empire, won the Gemmell Award). What was it like, taking on such an important character to the Warhammer mythology? Will you be revisiting any of the characters in the future?

When the Time of Legends series was first put to me, I don’t remember whether BL asked me to write Sigmar or I asked if I could take on those stories. I like to think it’s the latter, as I’ve always had a fascination with Sigmar’s story. How could an ordinary, mortal man take on such a challenge? This wasn’t a god (yet), a primarch, or a man who was in any way special… The only thing that really set him apart was that he had vision to see beyond the petty tribal rivalries that had kept humans at each other’s throats for generations. What would make a man like that, what would drive him and how would he do it without ‘super powers’? Admittedly, he has a magic hammer, but that’s not where the source of his power lies, it’s in his natural charisma and strength that makes men and women want to be better than they are and gives them a glimpse of the better future Sigmar sees for his race.

Originally, Heldenhammer was planned as a one off book, but it did very well and I had such a blast writing the story that the epilogue I had envisioned for the book that gives a brief, evocative sign off for the last part of Sigmar’s life was jettisoned. We knew there was much more life in the character and setting that we knew a trilogy would be the best way to tell the story. And two books later, we’ve still only scratched the surface of Sigmar’s story. Empire broadened and deepened the setting, and God King gave us an insight into how the Empire might run as a loosely unified nation.

The third book offered enough closure to enough of the storylines that we could have finished the series there, but the more I wrote of this age of Sigmar, the more stories suggested themselves. These were sub-plots of the books, to be sure, but ones I felt could be expanded in really interesting ways. They weren’t right to tell in the context of a Sigmar novel, but with the freedom to tell their stories in other ways, I knew we could have a fantastic playground to tell the stories of the other counts, other regions of the Empire and other kinds of stories that just wouldn’t fit within an Age of Legends novel about Sigmar. So, long story short, yeah, in one form or another, Sigmar and his companions will march again.

Defenders of Ulthuan will be re-published this September, along with a new sequel, Sons of Ellyrion. How would you introduce new readers to this series, and how does the sequel build on the first?

I’d tell them that if they wanted a tale of high fantasy with a real grounding in heroic, flawed characters who get drawn into a war that will decided the fate of the world, then they’d be onto a good thing by picking up Defenders of Ulthuan. The High Elves are a classic fantasy race, and it’s fun to write characters who are so much more than humans with pointy ears. The first book sets up the characters and the settings and kicks the action off, but it’s just the beginning, and what happens there is just the beginning of a much broader, epic battle for survival. It’s a story that loves the big, epic, world-changing storylines, but doesn’t sacrifice the smaller, character moments along the way.

I wanted to tell a story where the characters were the most important pieces of the jigsaw, the meat and muscle that drove the story on. Though events of great magnitude are playing out on the stage, they never get swallowed by the story, they’re very much front and centre. By the end of the book, you’ll be exhausted from the pummelling battle scenes and emotionally wrung out from the highs and lows experienced by the characters.

What made you decide it was time to revisit the characters, and how was it returning to them after so long?

I’d long wanted to get back to the High Elves, as it’s not fair to leave people hanging on for so long after such a monstrous cliff-hanger. But bigger stories and projects kept elbowing the High Elves out of the way for a few years until there came a point when I looked at my schedule and realised that if I didn’t get Sons of Ellyrion written now, then it wasn’t going to get written for at least another four years or so, and that was just silly, so we found some time and got it written, and I have to say I’m incredibly proud of that novel, as I think it’s got some of my best battle scenes and most poignant character moments in their midst.

I reread Defenders of Ulthuan before I came to start the sequel, and I was surprised at just how much I enjoyed it. That might sound silly, but it’s rare that I go back to reading something of my own (aside from reference-checking) and to re-read an entire novel and not pick a hundred holes in it was a real thrill. I read the novel as a novel, not as a final proof check, and it was great to find that it excited me as a reader even though I’d written the thing in the first place. And for years I’ve been sitting on the payoffs for these characters’ stories, so to finally get to write scenes I’ve had in my head for around four or five years was simply fantastic.

Now on to some a few general questions: Where do you draw your inspiration from? Who and what would you say are your biggest influences?

I get my inspiration from all around me. Every book I read, every film or TV show I watch, every overheard remark, misread sign and collaborative thought process is all grist for the mill. I like to think of my mind as a spinning collection of junk, random thoughts, half-formed ideas and trivial clutter that float about in some strange synaptic Brownian motion. These things bang into one another and form strange bonds that may make a story come to life, suggest a character or a plot twist. Sometimes it’ll be an idea in search of a story, or a story in search of characters to populate it, I never know. The secret is to keep feeding it fuel, and that’s why I’m a voracious reader, avid cinema buff and accumulator of the random book, magazine or TV show.

Dramas, comedies, documentaries, anything that looks interesting, I’ll read or watch and feed the random chaos in my mind. It might go in looking like one thing, but it won’t come out that way, it’ll have been mashed, subsumed, agglomerated and reshaped by a dozen creative impacts and come out as something shiny and bruised, but which will make for a cracking read… Okay, that went a bit surreal, so to bring it back to something approaching useful, I’d say my biggest influences outside of BL authors are, without a doubt, David Gemmell and Clive Barker. Their writing styles and stories have kept me coming back for more for decades and I’d recommend their books to everyone.



How do you enjoy being a writer and working within the publishing industry? Do you have any specific working, writing, researching practice? Specifically, how do you juggle so many different series and projects at the same time?

I love being a writer, and wouldn’t change jobs for the world. Despite what movies and TV shows tell me about the publishing industry, I’ve found it to be a fantastic place of incredible people who’ve been amazingly generous to me in terms of their time, advice and bar tabs. It’s an industry that thrives on creativity and folk getting together to throw ideas and concepts of fantastical things around, so to be part of that excitement is about the best place in the world I could imagine being.

I don’t have any particular practice I stick to rigidly, that’s kind of the point of being a freelance pirate: you can make your own rules of work and change them as you go along. Having said that, I have an office I rent so I can feel like I’ve got a proper job and be away from distractions such as the DVD collection and the X-Box. When I start a project, I’ll read lots of books and watch a few films that will either be direct research on the subject I’m writing about, or will get my head in the right thematic space. Again, it’s different for each book, so the process will be different for the next Ultramarines book as it will be for my next Arkham Horror novel.

As to how I keep it organised, I have lots of notebooks filled with assorted jumbled notes. I have a pretty good memory for this stuff, as it’s hard to forget the things you’ve worked on for so many months and into which I’ve poured my creative juices. And I have good editors who keep me on track.

When did you realise you wanted to be an author, and what was your first foray into writing? Do you still look back on it fondly?

I think I always wanted to be a writer, at least that’s my memory of it, I’m sure Fighter Pilot and Train Driver factored in there earlier. Though my mum tells me that when I was very young I told her that I wanted to either be a writer or a binman. I think I chose the right career, though when I saw how much binmen were making in overtime on the news the other day, I’m having my doubts…

My first foray into writing was a fantasy novel called Blood Magic, which I wrote when I was just starting high school. I never finished it, but I still keep all the type-written pages and look back on them now and again with great fondness. It’s very derivative and is riddled with typos and overwrought description, but there’s some good stuff there, and it’s good to look back every now and then to remind yourself that it’s taken many years and a lot of effort to come to a place where I can actually make a living from my words. I still have the print out of the first piece of writing I did in the GW Design Studio, and there’s more corrections in red ink than black ink from the printer on that page, which is another great reminder that we all need to start somewhere, and that – unless you’re very lucky – you’re not going to be an amazing writer straight out of the gate, you’re going to need to learn your craft and spend a lot of time becoming the writer you need to be. It’s also a great reminder that no matter how good you think you are, or how may people tell you that they love your books, there’s always something more to learn.

What projects do you have in the pipeline?

At the moment, I’m still finishing The Outcast Dead, and then I’m getting onto the second book in my Arkham Horror trilogy. The first book, Ghouls of the Miskatonic, is out later this year, so I’m gearing up for some watery horror in Kingsport just now… There’s rumours of a new duology of novels, some short fiction and another big Heresy novel in the new year. Looking at the schedule on my wall, I’m wondering if I can bend the laws of space-time to try and get them all done by the time my deadlines mug me.

Who are you reading at the moment (fiction and/or non-fiction)?

I’ve just finished David Simon’s Homicide, a book written after he’d spent a year with the Baltimore homicide department. It’s a book that gave rise to The Wire, and is an utterly compelling read, with characters that might have stepped straight from a hard-boiled detective novel. But that it’s real is never far from the surface and it was incredible to read of the dark underside of Baltimore, a city I’ve visited many times.

Fiction-wise, I’ve just read World War Z, which was great, though it did get a bit samey the longer it went on. As to what’s on my reading horizon, I’m going to read some Lovecraft and some Robert E. Howard to get me in a properly bonkers place for when I need to write my Arkham Horror book.

What’s something readers might be surprised to learn about you?

That I sleep with an axe under my pillow. Or maybe that I’m still in a state of shock that I’m allowed to live this life and that no-one’s made me get a proper job yet.

What are you most looking forward to in 2011?

The birth of my daughter, which will hopefully be in late July (but not too late, as I’ve an Iron Maiden gig to go to…).


phew, some cool titbits there though.

His blog, a wee while back, posted an Outcast Dead snippet if you're interested http://www.graham-mcneill.com/gmblog/PermaLink,guid,03c8fab4-d0b6-4a67-a8ce-eefdf27e0d45.aspx

Battle of the Fang rolls out soon ( next week IIRC) and its well worth picking up. I've just finished it for the 3rd time and have enjoyed it each and every time.

There's some reviews for your perusal
here http://civilian-reader.blogspot.com/2011/05/battle-of-fang-by-chris-wraight-black.html

here http://www.boomtron.com/2011/05/battle-of-the-fang-by-chris-wraight-review/

and here http://www.thefoundingfields.com/2011/05/battle-of-fang-chris-wraight-advanced.html

all full of praise for it.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
Flachzange wrote:Battle of the Fang was delivered today and I cant wait to get into it. Just gotta finish Caledor first, as well as Conviction, the next book in the Fate of the Jedi series.

PS: Great Interview! I got a chance to chat with Graham a bit during last years GD. He read a bit from his books, did a Q&A session and did some pictures and signings afterwards. Really nice guy and really into his stories and fluff!



Automatically Appended Next Post:
Flachzange wrote:Battle of the Fang was delivered today and I cant wait to get into it. Just gotta finish Caledor first, as well as Conviction, the next book in the Fate of the Jedi series.

PS: Great Interview! I got a chance to chat with Graham a bit during last years GD. He read a bit from his books, did a Q&A session and did some pictures and signings afterwards. Really nice guy and really into his stories and fluff!



Automatically Appended Next Post:
BrassScorpion wrote:Aaron Dembski-Bowden is signing books at the new Bowie Maryland Battle Bunker from 1-3 PM this Saturday, May 28.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
kronk wrote:His website says New York signings:

Okay, so, NYC signings:
GW Greenwich: May 27th 5pm–7pm.
Bowie Bunker: May 28th 1pm–3pm.

Edit: If I lived anywhere near there, I'd get Helsreach signed. Great book.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
skrulnik wrote:Battle of the Fang has been out a week now. I picked it up at GW on Friday.

So far, very good.
And interesting how it combines the pre-heresy and 40k characterizations together to create a link between the two.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
NELS1031 wrote:Battle of the Fang was really good. Like Red said in the last thread, one of Black Libraries finest, and definitely the best Space Marine Battles book so far. I don't even much care for Space Wolves or Thousand Sons and I found myself thoroughly engrossed with the characters that Chris Wraight created.

Highly recommend.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
Redscare wrote:Congratulations to Graham McNeil!

I may be in the minority on this, I definitely would have died a little inside if Dan Abnett won such recognition first, despite his few moments of triumph (namely Necropolis), which are few and far between.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
reds8n wrote: ..PMMV I guess.


from the BL site today..

BLACK LIBRARY AT GAMES DAY 2011

Games Day is Games Workshop’s premier annual event – a celebration of the Games Workshop hobby in all its forms, including – of course – the worlds of Black Library. This year’s UK event is on Sunday the 25th of September at the Birmingham NEC LG Arena, and Black Library will be there in force.

We’ll have loads of authors there for you to meet, eager to sign your books and chat about their work, including, very excitingly, William King, at his first Games Day for eight years, signing pre-release copies of his brand new novel, Blood of Aenarion.

Speaking of pre-releases, we’ll have plenty of fantastic books and audio dramas for you buy before their official release dates, as well as a huge array of books from across our ranges. We’ll also have samples of our online-only products, along with one hundred copies of the new – and extremely limited – Horus Heresy novella, Promethean Sun.

Our annual Games Day-exclusive book has been upgraded this year as well, and is now a handsome hardcover tome packed with six (yes, six!) awesome short stories from some of our most popular authors.

If you don’t want to miss out on all this excitement – and much more besides – then be sure to grab a Games Day ticket, available now from your local Games Workshop store or the Games Workshop website. Keep an eye on the blog, and White Dwarf magazine, for more details about the event.

Posted by The Black Library Team


from the latest WD t'would appear that Outcast Dead, Nocturne, The Red Duke and the eagerly anticipated Gildar's Rift will also be available for purchase... that sound is my wallet weeping already.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
BaronIveagh wrote:Got to read The Fang. Confused.
Spoiler:
So the Thousand sons were helping the Space Wolves *not* commit abominations of genetics while getting some revenge on?



Automatically Appended Next Post:
NELS1031 wrote:
BaronIveagh wrote:Got to read The Fang. Confused.
Spoiler:
So the Thousand sons were helping the Space Wolves *not* commit abominations of genetics while getting some revenge on?



Spoiler:
No, they were preventing the Wolves from making a "Space Wolf" without the Wolf part that makes them who they are for better or worse. From what I gather, the flaws of the Canis Helix don't take kindly to mass production. If these experiments had grown to fruition, the Wolves would have had as many "successors" as the Ultramarines . Enough successors to surround the Eye of Terror and keep all the traitors hemmed in for all time. I thought the correlation between the two legions was pretty neat too. Ahriman destroyed the heart of his legion because of the flesh change, and Magnus needed to prevent the Wolves from essentially doing the same thing, eliminating thier version of the flesh change so that they could rebuild to "legion" strength again. Thats a scenario that Magnus could not allow.


At least thats how I interpeted it.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
BaronIveagh wrote:
Spoiler:
Um, the Space Wolves are still at Legion Strength, there's no rebuilding necessary.

If that's the case, why would he not have stepped in when they did the same thing during the Cursed Founding?



Automatically Appended Next Post:
reds8n wrote:
BaronIveagh wrote:
Spoiler:
Um, the Space Wolves are still at Legion Strength, there's no rebuilding necessary.

If that's the case, why would he not have stepped in when they did the same thing during the Cursed Founding?


No, they're not quite at that strength.

Spoiler:
They lost 50% or so of their numbers when they founded their successor chapter, add in other losses and their barely over 1000 marines.

I would suggest that the lack of any other further similarly sized actions are due to the inability of the 1K sons to mount or indeed equip any such undertaking. The assault on the Fang pretty much ended them as well.

I'll second Mr. NELS1031, the new..( improved ?) Wolves were only genetic abominations in the eyes of the native Fenrisians. All that could have been eh ?





Automatically Appended Next Post:
BaronIveagh wrote:
reds8n wrote:

No, they're not quite at that strength.

Spoiler:
They lost 50% or so of their numbers when they founded their successor chapter, add in other losses and their barely over 1000 marines.

I would suggest that the lack of any other further similarly sized actions are due to the inability of the 1K sons to mount or indeed equip any such undertaking. The assault on the Fang pretty much ended them as well.

I'll second Mr. NELS1031, the new..( improved ?) Wolves were only genetic abominations in the eyes of the native Fenrisians. All that could have been eh ?




*Sigh* Yeah, forgot this was a 'small SW' edition. 7th they'll be back up to a 'large SW' again if the pattern of the numbers going up and down continues. Previous fluff has had them as large as a Great Company equaling a Codex Chapter, or as small as the entire Space Wolves as small as a single understrength Chapter. (Usually they run the inverse of how awesome the Ultramarines are in fluff)



Automatically Appended Next Post:
ChrisWraight wrote:
BaronIveagh wrote:*Sigh* Yeah, forgot this was a 'small SW' edition. 7th they'll be back up to a 'large SW' again if the pattern of the numbers going up and down continues. Previous fluff has had them as large as a Great Company equaling a Codex Chapter, or as small as the entire Space Wolves as small as a single understrength Chapter. (Usually they run the inverse of how awesome the Ultramarines are in fluff)


Have you got a reference for the Great Company=Codex Chapter size? I've seen this quoted in a few places online, but never seen it in anything official.

I asked GW about the SW Chapter size when writing Fang. I ended up using 2,500 as the rough Chapter strength, post Heresy up until M41, and as far as I know that's what they were always intended to be (roughly). That would make a Great Company anything from 100-300 Marines (assuming variable sizes, with the Great Wolf's being the biggest).

The issue of Legion sizes is slightly vexed, and you'd be better off asking a Heresy author for the numbers here. I *think* that the Wolves were around 80,000 strong in Prospero Burns, but don't quote me.

We know that the SWs only had one successor, the Wolf Brothers. If the Legion size of 80,000 is correct, and it was split into two Chapters of, say, 3,000 each, then they must have suffered huge casualties during the latter stages of the Heresy. That story, though, has yet to be told.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
BaronIveagh wrote:
ChrisWraight wrote:
BaronIveagh wrote:*Sigh* Yeah, forgot this was a 'small SW' edition. 7th they'll be back up to a 'large SW' again if the pattern of the numbers going up and down continues. Previous fluff has had them as large as a Great Company equaling a Codex Chapter, or as small as the entire Space Wolves as small as a single understrength Chapter. (Usually they run the inverse of how awesome the Ultramarines are in fluff)


Have you got a reference for the Great Company=Codex Chapter size? I've seen this quoted in a few places online, but never seen it in anything official.

I asked GW about the SW Chapter size when writing Fang. I ended up using 2,500 as the rough Chapter strength, post Heresy up until M41, and as far as I know that's what they were always intended to be (roughly). That would make a Great Company anything from 100-300 Marines (assuming variable sizes, with the Great Wolf's being the biggest).

The issue of Legion sizes is slightly vexed, and you'd be better off asking a Heresy author for the numbers here. I *think* that the Wolves were around 80,000 strong in Prospero Burns, but don't quote me.

We know that the SWs only had one successor, the Wolf Brothers. If the Legion size of 80,000 is correct, and it was split into two Chapters of, say, 3,000 each, then they must have suffered huge casualties during the latter stages of the Heresy. That story, though, has yet to be told.


IIRC it was originally from either WD or Chapter Approved, though it will take me a bit to find it. It was republished off and on since then, depending on which source the author was pulling from.

I'd point out that current fluff is contradictory as to if the Wolves even took part in the latter stages of the heresy at all. Most fluff seems ot tend toward the idea that the Wolves got sidetracked along the way, but this conflicts with Russ agonizing over the fact he was unable to reach Terra in time to aid the Emperor.

It's sort of like what tanks the Space Wolves use. Before current Edition, the Space Wolves actually had access to the Leman Russ.

Though, I grant, I had actually figured that your novel was boarderline falling into the Great Company = Chapter size spectrum, since you specifically brought up Stormbirds, which are company sized dropships. No single chapter in it's right mind would use one, since if one gets shot down, there goes 10-12% of your entire force.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
NELS1031 wrote:Loved your newest book, dude. Well done.



Automatically Appended Next Post:
Just Dave wrote:
JHall wrote:Sorry, didn't find the end of Savage Weapons to be that shocking. That accusation had been leveled at the Ultras before, so it fit right in with what some people thought. That was my take at least.


True. But this time it wasn't an accusation but 'fact'. Adds a nice bit of character to Guilliman (much needed) IMHO.

ChrisWraight wrote:I asked GW about the SW Chapter size when writing Fang. I ended up using 2,500 as the rough Chapter strength, post Heresy up until M41, and as far as I know that's what they were always intended to be (roughly). That would make a Great Company anything from 100-300 Marines (assuming variable sizes, with the Great Wolf's being the biggest).

The issue of Legion sizes is slightly vexed, and you'd be better off asking a Heresy author for the numbers here. I *think* that the Wolves were around 80,000 strong in Prospero Burns, but don't quote me.

We know that the SWs only had one successor, the Wolf Brothers. If the Legion size of 80,000 is correct, and it was split into two Chapters of, say, 3,000 each, then they must have suffered huge casualties during the latter stages of the Heresy. That story, though, has yet to be told.

This message was edited 18 times. Last update was at 2011/06/04 00:01:24


   
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Wall of quoted text ....

The High Lords gather...


What is this secret project the are talking at the BL site of?

Target locked,ready to fire



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Chances are Horus Heresy related, that's about the only reason the big ones gather a few times a year: to discuss who is going to tackle what and the secrets they plan to unveil with their stories.



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ADB said he was going to Nottingham for his Horus Heresy meeting, so I'd say it's a good bet BrookM.
   
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Chances are he'll have another go at landing the World Eaters.



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BrookM wrote:Chances are he'll have another go at landing the World Eaters.

I would not be surprised, considering his facebook post this morning...
   
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What did he say? I'm not really into the whole social media thing.



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Didn't he already land the World Eaters? He more or less said as much in the video interview he did a few weeks back.
   
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Aaron Dembski-Bowden said:"Today is largely taken up by describing Kharn and Argel Tal plotting against their primarchs"

(from his Facebook)

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/06/05 01:29:06


 
   
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Kanluwen wrote:ADB said he was going to Nottingham for his Horus Heresy meeting, so I'd say it's a good bet BrookM.


Negatory. I specifically said it wasn't for a Horus Heresy meeting.

Tsk, tsk.
   
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Dead Blue Clown wrote:
Kanluwen wrote:ADB said he was going to Nottingham for his Horus Heresy meeting, so I'd say it's a good bet BrookM.


Negatory. I specifically said it wasn't for a Horus Heresy meeting.

Tsk, tsk.

Oh noes, misinformation! Curses!

So are we ever gonna get a sequel to Cadian Blood? Or am I the only one clamoring for that?
   
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Cadian Blood had a good ending, no need for a sequel really. I'd rather see another regiment tackled. Elysians maybe? Dare I say one featuring them and actually winning for a change?



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BrookM wrote:Cadian Blood had a good ending, no need for a sequel really. I'd rather see another regiment tackled. Elysians maybe? Dare I say one featuring them and actually winning for a change?


Man, that'd be the last thing I need. I've always wanted an Elysian army since they were first introduced during the Armageddon campaign with converted SM Scouts, but I've never pulled the trigger to build the army. A book in which they win would put me over the edge and bring me on some serious debt!

Man, I wish there was a real Black Library where I could get a Black Library Card and take out Black Library Books without having to buy them. Of course, late fees would be your soul. But it would be worth it. - InquisitorMack 
   
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Quite so, the background written by Forge World makes for a depressing motivator. Chances are project Hoth will also see them betrayed or doing an "oops" and probably freeze to death.



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So, I just saw some interesting new stuff on the Black Library's "Coming Soon".

1) Andy Chambers is writing a book due out in March 2012 called "Path of the Renegade". Chambers, writing a book about the Eldar Rangers? I'll take two!
2) Dan Abnett has a book out in the same timeframe called "Know No Fear".
3)Same timeframe, Graham McNeill has the "Iron Warriors Omnibus" releasing.
4)April 2012 has two notable books in it from what I can see. Ben Counter writing "Phalanx" and Rob Sanders writing "Legion of the Damned".
5)May 2012 has several books I'm intrigued by. First is Graham McNeill and "Eye of Vengeance"(Is Sergeant Telion getting his own book? I think so), second is C.L. Werner writing "Dead Winter". There's another omnibus releasing at that timeframe, called "Architect of Fate" edited by Christian Dunn and ADB is releasing another book. Something called "Void Stalker". Who knows what that could be!
   
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Path of the Renegade is the third Eldar novel by Gav Thorpe and yes, it is about Rangers and Dark Eldar as the third "friend" is followed.

Phalanx is nothing too new if you already read Hammer & Bolter.

Void Stalker is something that I really, really want to read right now.



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http://www.blacklibrary.com/all-products/coming-soon/path-of-the-renegade.html

Begs to differ.
   
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Kanluwen wrote:So, I just saw some interesting new stuff on the Black Library's "Coming Soon".

1) Andy Chambers is writing a book due out in March 2012 called "Path of the Renegade". Chambers, writing a book about the Eldar Rangers? I'll take two!
2) Dan Abnett has a book out in the same timeframe called "Know No Fear".
3)Same timeframe, Graham McNeill has the "Iron Warriors Omnibus" releasing.
4)April 2012 has two notable books in it from what I can see. Ben Counter writing "Phalanx" and Rob Sanders writing "Legion of the Damned".
5)May 2012 has several books I'm intrigued by. First is Graham McNeill and "Eye of Vengeance"(Is Sergeant Telion getting his own book? I think so), second is C.L. Werner writing "Dead Winter". There's another omnibus releasing at that timeframe, called "Architect of Fate" edited by Christian Dunn and ADB is releasing another book. Something called "Void Stalker". Who knows what that could be!


1) No clue
2) It comes up as Horus Heresy - Ultramarines or Imperial Fists perhaps?
3) Storm of Iron and all the short story compilation bits iirc from the other books that had Honsou in them.
4) Phalanx - Next Souldrinker's book?
5) Void Stalker = Night Lords - Think about it. Soul Hunter. Blood Reaver. This matches the pattern.....

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/06/08 15:12:54



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The Void Stalker bit was a joke.

If "Know No Fear" comes up as Horus Heresy--Calth!

I'd think Phalanx is an Imperial Fists book, frankly. They've yet to get one, and Counter has done some writing for the Horus Heresy. BrookM says it has something to do with Hammer & Bolter, so maybe we should look there.
   
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Phalanx is the serialized Soul Drinkers novel.
   
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Wasn't "Phalanx" a bunch of stories serialized in HAMMER & BOLTER?

Isn't this then a compilation of those stories?

   
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It very well might be. It has no information about it.

I haven't checked out Hammer & Bolter, so...
   
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No might be about it, I just bought the run of H&B and have been reading through them.

Just wish I hadn't read the Soul Drinkers books so long ago. I don't remember much of them.

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In an email to Mr Abnett before he said that Know No Fear is indeed about Calth.

Enlist as a virtual Ultramarine! Click here for my Chaos Gate (PC) thread.

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"As I recall, your face was tortured. Imagine that - the Master of the Wolves, his ferocity twisted into grief. And yet you still carried out your duty. You always did what was asked of you. So loyal. So tenacious. Truly you were the attack dog of the Emperor. You took no pleasure in what you did. I knew that then, and I know it now. But all things change, my brother. I'm not the same as I was, and you're... well, let us not mention where you are now."
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How about an e-mail to Dan Abnett asking when he is going to write a sequel to LEGION, dammit!!!

   
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I've asked him that before on Twitter Alph. He replied with:
@ntrisley it's a secret.


Maybe he'll do it, maybe he won't. Maybe he just likes leaving us hanging.
   
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Kanluwen wrote:There's another omnibus releasing at that timeframe, called "Architect of Fate" edited by Christian Dunn


You can read more on this here...

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Pyroriffic wrote:
Kanluwen wrote:There's another omnibus releasing at that timeframe, called "Architect of Fate" edited by Christian Dunn


You can read more on this here...

So that's Project: Hot Dog you keep putting on Twitter. Clever Girl!
   
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Kanluwen wrote:
Pyroriffic wrote:
Kanluwen wrote:There's another omnibus releasing at that timeframe, called "Architect of Fate" edited by Christian Dunn


You can read more on this here...

So that's Project: Hot Dog you keep putting on Twitter. Clever Girl!


Project Hotdog is the first one that got a code name. Ever since, everything I'm doing for BL has gotten a code name. I plan to explain where their names come from after they're published...

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I think I've cracked your code.

Spoiler:
It's the names of the pilots in the BSG reboot.
   
 
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