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Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland



Way back last year I read an alt history book, A Kill in the Morning, which had a rather compelling timeline (with absolutely no alien space bats). Historical games haven’t really ever been my thing, but that was my in to making models of the period.

Following Dunkirk, Rudolph Hess’ doomed flight manages to succeed, and with it the British Empire exits the war, ending the conflict in Europe. For the next decade the Soviets fight alone on the Eastern Front, as the world enters a Cold War between the super powers.

The book doesn’t go into the mechanics of the war, rather it focuses on a James Bond style character on a globetrotting frolic to stop Reinhard Heydrich, the now de-facto leader of the Nazi party, and get revenge. This premise of a Germany which would have had the resources to produce its wonder weapons, instead of continuing on from the failed state it was in 1945 like most alt-history fiction uses as a starting point, seemed like just the excuse to make some toy soldiers…

So, here, look at these messes, excuse the fluff where it becomes too nonsensical.

The poor damn infantry, Heer Grenadiers:






The Soviet Front was becoming a forever war. What men went there, other than those used in the flashy propaganda reels, became largely forgotten. Those who had been there long enough were armed with a mish-mash of gear, some dating from the early days of Operation Barbarossa. In order to combat the proliferation of automatic weapons various attempts were made to increase the survivability of the average soldier. These may wear a number of models, including captured Soviet ones, of plate vest. Unsuited for wear, and often incapable of stopping anything more than a ricochet, many were abandoned, sans for the Panzer Grenadiers who had a cushy Katzchen APC to ride in.

These guys are a mix of Wargames Factory and Warlord Games plastics, Dust German and Soviet torsos , West Wind heads, and a hell of a lot of greenstuff for all the gaps and winter clothing. I have a commander for them in a WIP state as well.

Spoiler:


In the real world the Soviets did make use of body armour, with there apparently being instances of their use in German service. The SS may have tested using WWI era German armour as well, but I can’t find any sources to back that up. As for the weaponry, the StG-45 is an anachronism here, but it fits in with their bedraggled look. Rather the Gerat-06 (both in full auto and semi-auto forms) was to be the standardised AR of the Reich (however the prototypes largely wound up sitting unused in a train in the Alps at the end of the war). Post-war the Gerat became the CETME rifle, which led onto the G3.


Speaking of Katzchens…




The Katzchen had been developed as part of a program to deliver a fully tracked armoured personnel carrier for the Heer. A number of designs were proposed, though one which re-used they now obsolete Panzer 38 (t) chassis was ultimately chosen. Able to carry 8 men (including crew), they were issued widely to the Heer and other combat forces, which after the Opel Blitz truck had become the most widely used transport for the German military. By the late 40s however, they were largely obsolete, their thin armour and exposed crew compartments (remedied with a later model) making them just too susceptible enemy fire.

Spoiler:



Each of these started as a Rubicon Hetzer kit. That company’s kits are just superb, with the conversion being relatively simple (just plasticard slapped on top of the existing hull). You could even make two of these per kit if you’re willing to use the spare set of tracks and rebuilt the inner track assembly (which I did, but I’m getting ahead of myself here).

Spoiler:


The Katzchen was a real vehicle, which did see service in very (as in a handful) numbers. When the Allies captured them they thought they were ammunition carriers, till documentation was found later on (the crew benches were perhaps a giveaway for their purpose). Post-war the Swedes made their own APC based on the same chassis, though it didn’t see any combat service and was later replaced.


Grif IFV



As the war progressed the inadequacy of the Katzchen had become apparent, thus earlier plans for a larger APC were taken out. The Panther, whilst more than a match for the Soviet T-34, had great difficulty in beating the latest generation of the Soviet tanks. This led to a modernization process, but still many were fast being relegated to the scrap yards. The Griffon was an attempt to re-use these older hulls as an APC, capable of transporting 12 men and their equipment. A run of Puma turrets were made to provide the vehicle with a simple armament, though the Griffon wasn’t intended as more than a “battle bus”.

Spoiler:



A Warlord Games Panther tank with the engine moved to the front and a platicard passenger compartment added to the rear. The turret was my early attempt at a Puma’s, though I have spare ones laying about now which I probably aught to go back and use.

Spoiler:


Historically the Germans had put forth a number of prospective tanks for their APC program, though the 38(t) was ultimately chosen (with the final model being cited by the Allies as having a very Panther like appearance). This has more in line with the Bradley IFV though.


An Armoured Opel Blitz



Despite leaps in technology, for a time most of the German military was still armed to its early war standard. As troops road into battle inside heavy APCs with Assault Rifles and body armour, at their sides were guns being drawn on horse limbers and men in trucks. Improvisation was the name of the game. The Opel Blitz was the workhorse (…barring the actual horses) of the German army, with this example having some ad-hoc plates welded onto it for extra protection.

Spoiler:



A Rubicon Opel Blitz with some plasticard slapped on.

The Soviets made use of armoured trucks as their counter to the Sd.Kfz 250/251, though I don’t think I’ve seen any German armoured trucks which were so elaborate. This one’s based on a Luftwaffe armoured conversion of the Opel Blitz which mounted an AA gun, just with an armoured rear compartment added rather than the open deck.


“Eber” APC



Not all the APCs used by the Reich were quite so …standardised. This example is an in-field conversion which mated multiple obsolete Panzer III hulls (destined to become emplacements) with Sd.Kfz 251s bodies. The end result was a vehicle more capable of dealing with the Eastern Front’s harsh conditions, and less prone to break downs as a result of the 251’s original road wheel system. Later on an enclosed roof was added, both for protection …and the climate.

A mix of a Rubicon Sd.Kfz 251 and their Panzer III. Its actually based on an APC I saw concept art for from a Japanese game Valkyria Chronicles, just using WWII vehicle parts

Spoiler:


Again, somewhat based in reality. The Germans would stick obsolete tank tracks onto their tracks to make them better handle the rough terrain. Post-war the Soviets did mount various trucks onto tank chassis for use as engineer vehicles, though not as APCs


Sd.Kfz 234/5 “Mammut”



The “Mammut “was the Luftwaffe’s attempt at creating a light APC for its ground and paratrooper forces. The Sd.Kfz 234 chassis were chosen as a basis for this conversion, with the potential for the final vehicle to be used in a similar recce role. Overall the “Mammut” filled this role admirably …barring when it began to saw service on the Eastern Front, where they quickly became bogged down on the muddy roads. Ultimately most were issued to those units due to operate in the Middle East, or to anti-partisan forces in Europe.

Where the other half of that 251 went… I stuck the rear cab of that onto a Puma chassis (with the tracks reversed) along with a Panzer II Luchs turret. …and a lot of gap filler.

Spoiler:


Now, onto the fun stuff…


Panzer IV Ausf. K



By 1946 the Panzer IV had been largely marked for re-assignment to second line duties or were being scrapped. Attempts however were made to make the vehicle somewhat competitive in secondary theatres. A new, high velocity gun replaced the original, with the whole hull being also redesigned to include sloped armour and elements from the Panzer III/IV project. Unfortunately the K would see combat against modern Soviet tanks more often than not, which it was wholly incapable of fighting, which resulted in most being re-issued to Germany’s foreign allies.

A Rubicon Panzer IV with plasticard armour, and extended at the back with some Panther exhausts. The main gun’s a Tamiya 1/48th lamppost and the barrel off of a Forgeworld autocannon.

The Ausf.K’s entirely fictional, dreamt up by modellers. The Panzer IV just wouldn’t have been viable, even if they stuck a 75mm on it (which was proposed, though quickly shot down as the chassis was already overstrained). A guy can dream…


Jagdpanzer III/IV



With the inception of the Entwichlung-series, the Panzer III/IV, along with the Panzer 38 (t) were envisaged as a method for re-using older proven design – largely not as front line tanks, but as more specialised vehicles. This Jagd III/IV is an example of one such use, and an odd beast at that. Originally intended to mount an 88mm gun (thus the unusual casement), this was downsized for production, with only a short run of vehicles being built after it was quickly realized that their role was already fulfilled by other standardized E-series assault guns.

Spoiler:


A Warlord Panzer IV with a Panther gun, and plasticard casement and engine deck.

Spoiler:


The Panzer III/IV was a real thing, seeking to mate the internal running gear and other components of the Panzer III with the Panzer IV for efeciency in production. A couple of vehicles, like the Nashorn used it as a basis. This odd duck though, is a cross between that, and a proposed design for a StuG III mounting an 88mm gun, though that was determined to be a very silly idea, and only existed as a wooden mockup.

Spoiler:



Kugelblitz 38 (t)



Used to provide AA support to infantry formations, the Kugelblitz was a widely used turret, mounted from everything from light tanks to armoured railway carriages. The standard pattern issued to the military was the mount in its 38(t) (and later 38(d) and E-25 guise). A relatively light chassis unsuited for front line combat, but more than capable of the much smaller bore AA guns the mount included.

Spoiler:


And well, what to do with those spare Hetzer tracks from earlier… This is largely plasticard, with a Kugelblitz Turret by Heer 46.

The Kugelblitz was a real thing, with a few produced (and one reportedly being down by the US in combat) in the last days of the war. These were prototypes mounted on the Panzer IV chassis however, whilst the production model was supposed to use the 38 (t) (my mention of the 38 (d) there is in reference to a simplified, larger, German successor to the original Czech inter-war tank).

And with the funny little tanks now squared away, time to move onto some of the larger stuff…


Panther II



During the early war the Panther had been largely unopposed by all but the heaviest of Soviet armour. This superiority had quickly been usurped, with German designers being pushed into developing a more capable beast. The Panther II was the result. The Panther II fitted with a new smaller Schmalturm turret, a gas turbine engine and using heavier Tiger II tracks to resolve earlier weight issues, along with a full set of Infra-red gear. This particular example also boasts a complete set of spaced addon armour, which saw issue through the tank’s life cycle to withstand larger Soviet guns and shaped charge weapons.

Spoiler:



A Rubicon Panther with Heer 46 turret and Warlord Tiger II tracks, plus the requisite plasticard. A hell of a beast…

Spoiler:


The Panther II was a real thing. Only one was built, before German command demanded a less radical upgrade for the Panther. It didn’t include a gas turbine engine or the turret, those were late war proposals, but feasible I suppose in this alternative timeline. The addon armour’s all me.


Czech Panther II



With the success of the Panther II proposals were made for production to be outsourced to Germany’s “allied” states. Czechoslovakia was a prominent arms producer, with many of its vehicles (particular the 38(t)) seeing service in the German army. With the Czech design for simplifications were made to the original model, particular the inclusion of a cast hull; which the Czechs were adept at. Ultimately however, the project was a failure. Corruption led to quality issues, as did the inception of the E-series make tanks other than the E-50/75 obsolete.


Spoiler:


And things are becoming weirder… This started with me wanting to make a cast hull Panther, then thinking that wouldn’t suit the period, so I stuck some Tiger II tracks on it. Its another Rubicon Panther, this time with a milliput hull and turret and Warlord Tiger II tracks again. Oh, and the Tamiya lamppost makes another appearance as a barrel.

Spoiler:


There were no plans for a cast hull Panther, but it’s a cool idea, and would have increased production of that tank had it been outsourced. Obviously there would have been even worse quality control issues with foreign factories than German ones though.


Intermediate Tiger



A missing link in the development of the Tiger II…?

Spoiler:


Not going to lie, this was just an excuse for me to use a spare Warlord Tiger kit I have and slap some spaced armour on it. I didn’t even bother thinking up any fluff, it’s a dumb idea.

Spoiler:


The original Tiger came after the T-34, which had sloped armour. They didn’t include any on the Tiger though for presumably a few reasons (smaller crew space/ the armour being considered thick enough), but would later revise that idea with the Tiger II.


Jagdtiger II



A heavier revision of the original Jagdtiger. The II featured thicker armour and a larger superstructure (which protected the exposed engine from enemy aircraft and artillery). The result was intended as for long range support out on the flat Russian steppe, which was its eventual role …as more often than not due to its slow speed and rather weak front torsion bar, they were mostly abandoned in static positions.

Spoiler:


A Warlord Tiger II plus a hell of a lot of plasticard. Oh and a Dust muzzle break. The camo’s entirely fictional, but I’m dubbing it the Christmas Tree …I mean pine forest pattern.

Spoiler:


There was no Jagdtiger II, even on paper. This concept of mounting the gun straight at the front was proposed, but went up in flames when the designers discovered the thing would crush the already mimetically bad front torsion bar of the Tiger II chassis. Meh, looks cool though.

And now onto the final spiel of this long ass post….

SS Sturmtruppen



The party had envisioned the SS as their premier fighting force. What it became was a bedraggled mess of non-uniformly equipped soldiers, and host to a multitude of non-party aligned international troops.
SS Butchhunde was intended as the pilot for a restructuring of the party’s armed wing, in tandem with a similar effort being made with the Heer. The unit was thrown into the Eastern front, and served …as expected, before ultimately being routed. In its tenure they hosted a plethora of equipment which didn’t see standard use, including reported the first action of the Panzermensch.

Spoiler:




These are Mantic Games Colonial Troopers (or whatever they call them, they’re OOP now), with a mix of Wargames Factory and Dust heads, plus a load of greenstuff. Their guns are fictional, made from: AR15 stocks and magazines, MP-40 bodies, and PPsH-41 barrels.

SS Officer



A bad bastard. Nuff said.

He’s a Wargames Factory American GI with a coat sculpted on, and a head and pistol from their German kit. Originally he was an Enclave officer for my Fallout stuff, I just gave him a repaint.


SS Panzermensch



The Reich was always fond of its wonder waffens, though few ever worked out as planned (rather my sheer stint of the occasional one which worked at all were the Germans capable of maintaining their stalemate with the Soviets). The history of these armoured suits is mired in folklore, but reports indicate there limited use at Stalingrad (deployed from a large Tiger based APC) and on occasion by British agents operating within German Heavy Water Plants. No concrete evidence was ever produced however.

A Konflikt 47 German Heavy Infantryman. This doesn’t fit explicitly in the world I’m making most of my models for, though the book I’m basing all of this one does have hints of stuff like this going on in the background. I have a whole squad of them to paint, ah, but seeing as they’d see limited use I haven’t quite been around to it quite yet.


There’s other bits and pieces in my gallery, along with WIPs of other projects for this. I’ll save posting that junk here as well …because this is probably enough of an image dump already.

This message was edited 4 times. Last update was at 2017/06/05 19:14:32


 
   
Made in us
Seven Year War Afficianado




MN

Wow. Kool!

It looks like these would be great with Konflict 47 or a similar Wierd War II set of rules!

Do you like Free Wargames?
http://bloodandspectacles.blogspot.com/ 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

If I could ever actually finish enough infantry for a game...

I've played a few tank only games with these things at least. The intent's been to run them with standard Bolt Action rules, as I'm really not into the weirdness of Konflikt 47 and would rather stay to something a bit more realistic (realistic in that most of the fluff's complete horsegak, but at least there;s no zombies...).

Currently I'm working on a German version of the LVT for a cancelled invasion of Israel which occurred in the book/ a potential Operation Sealion Mk2 (though for that I'd like to have a Vichi French force). Besides that, I've also just started on some Japanese. I'm not sure if they'll be part of the same timeline (what's happening in that part of the world isn't mentioned), or some defence of the Home Islands (Operation Downfall/ Olympic) scenario. Damn the Japanese tanks were so obsolete compared to European developments; even stuff like the Chi-Ri (Panther equivalent). Thank feth things didn't go that far....

Though on that note I'll see about picking up the Japanese book out of interest. Not to run games with, as I can barely make enough German infantry, just out of interest what's actually in there seeing as Warlord seem to sell a load of tanks which never saw service (I guess because they made a couple of mid war chassis, and it was easy enough to convert them for the prototypes).


 
   
Made in eu
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Japanese tanks for the defence of the Home Islands.



The Chi-Nu was an interim modernisation of the Chi-Ha design, itself just a stopgap leading onto the Chi-To (and tangentially Chi-Ri) model. Under 200 were made, and issued for the defence of the Home Islands. None saw service, but the post-war Japanese Defence force did use them for a time.

Spoiler:



The Ho-Ru was an attempt to salvage some last use out of the interwar Ha-Go tankette. The Ha-Go had seen much service, but was severely dated, even in its later guise as the Ke-Nu light tank. By adding a casement mounted 47mm gun it was hoped that the vehicle may see some life as an ambush tank, though the small calibur gun would have been incapable of penetrating a Sherman's armour (let alone the upgraded variants which the US had started deploying). At most one Ho-Ru was built, but the navy had greater need for the raw materials, as did the war end, so no mass conversions ever took place.

Spoiler:



The Chi-Nu's an out of the box Warlord 1/56th kit (barring a good bit of knife work to clean it up). The Ho-Ru's also a Warlord kit, but with a plasticard casement added.

Of course by that point in the war the Japanese hardly had the resources to make these in significant numbers. That'd also be moot considering the US planned on dropping something like up to 22 Nuclear bombs during Operation Downfall (then marching in the combined Western armies, with the Soviets possibly attacking from the North > though Stalin wasn't warm to that waste of manpower).

The Americans are still issuing surplus Purple Hearts from that cancelled operation till this day. ...And that's a surplus merely accounting for the loss of lives to just the enemy. They didn't know how radiation poisoning worked, so were going to march in the troops two days after using the nukes. :(

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2017/05/01 13:27:37


 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Right, time for the monthly update.

Panzer Fahre



Between the cancelled Operation Sea Lion and eventual cancellation of the planned invasion of the Dominion of Israel Germany had prototyped numbers amphibious tanks, based on nearly all of their Panzer models. The Panzer Fahre was a unique concept however, merging the roles of an armoured landing craft and the new concept of the fully tracked personnel carrier. This example is based on the Panther tank chassis, itself entering obsolescence as Germany's forces massed in the Middle East. Though the invasion was held off, the Panzer Ferry saw extensive use on the Eastern Front. Unfortunately deficiencies in the design became quickly evident. The interleaved road wheel arrangement was prone to collecting mud, which then froze locking up the wheels, something which had been replaced on newer Panzer models, but continued to see use on the the LVTs. Whilst the fully enclosed layout provided protection for the passengers, due to the vehicle being a conversion of an existing hull mounting a rear ramp was impossible, so the men had to exit via cramped top hatches (an awkward position in the best of situations). Eventually a dedicated LVT would be developed years later, however these early predecessors could still be found in limited use by the Axis into the 60s.

Spoiler:


The model uses a Warlord Panther as a basis. Its the tracks and hull from that kit then the rest's pretty much all plasticard, barring a Clockwork Goblin Spinne turret. I was watching The Pacific and wanted to give my Germans something similar. Its not that practical, but I guess that's alright for the period. Whether the Germans eventually made something similar to what the Soviets did, or stuck with the bulky LVT style like the US did is up in the air. I'd like to make some Vichi French for an Operation Sea Lion in the 60s, so maybe that'll eventually be an excuse to explore that a bit.

Spoiler:


Jagdpanther II Ausf. A



As the transition over to the Panther II progressed, a Jagd variant had already entered service. The Panther II was supposed to be the ultimate developement of the Panther II, which had meant the design had gone through a number of iterations before going into full scale production. The Ausf. A was in fact merely a conversion of the prototype II hulls mated with the earlier Jagdpanther super structures. Eventually a proper Jagd variant would enter service, though ultimately Speer had already ordered that all mainline battle tank production be switched over to the E-series before many saw service.

Spoiler:


I quite like my Panther II. The Jagdpanther is a sexy beast as well, so this seemed a natural fit. Pity I forgot that the II which I'd made had a jet engine. ...Thus the Ausf.A part. The zimmerit's something I've wanted to do for a while, and whilst I'm not too happy about the end result ...it does cover up the gaps. I'd imagine in the timeline zimmerit didn't get phased out under the same circumstances that it did in the real world. Rather with the use of man portable RPGs it became obsolete, though I suppose they had to do something with those thousands of spare zimmerit barrels (maybe flog them off to a foreign state on the cheap).

Jagdpanzer III/IV



Another one of these. I liked the first one which I threw together, but the camo scheme wasn't doing it for me. This time around I just whitewashed it. The netting's been something I was interested in seeing turn out, with the orange and whitewash being a nice contrast.

Spoiler:


And WIPs of the Jagdpanzers.

Spoiler:


Panzer II Luchs prototype



An attempt to upgrade the Panzer II Luchs, this one converted to have a Puma turret in order to remain competitive in the modern battlefield. ....We'll just totally ignore that there was actually a [Panzer II Ausf. J which served a similar purpose (but damn if I'm going to make one of those, as they were Panzer IIs only in name - looking more like mini-Tiger Is).

Spoiler:


This one's based on a series of photographs of some sort of Panzer II Luchs with sloped armour they were testing. Oddly its mis-attributed as a the Leopard prototype, but that doesn't make much sense to me seeing as the Leopard came before the Luchs. That and the pictures are clearly a Luchs (re: the overall size, turret and exhausts. The Leopard was similar in scale to the Panther - thus why Speer cancelled the thing, as why not just have a Panther). Its a Warlord Panzer II Luchs mixed with a 1/72nd Panther and 1/56th Warlord Puma turret (the actual Leopard turret was wider than the Puma turret FYI).

Spoiler:

Spoiler:
mg][/url][/spoiler]

SS Riflemen




CP Models Kharkov SS. They're taller than regular 28mm, as per the usual with that sculptor. I bought them to go along with the Heer 46 SS, so hopefully they won't look massively out of place (they will). Aye, I'll mix and max the coats, they aren't meant to be deployed so uniformly.

Heer Lieutenant



Another officer for the force. Yeah, he's "Heer", but the force is really just a mish-mash (and well I could easily just say they're all SS ...barring the Luftwaffe models I have sitting there). He's wearing mostly period stuff, barring the steel plate vest and that assault rifle.

Spoiler:


Next on the list's terrain and waiting on my order from Heer 46 to finish off enough infantry for a 750 pts force. I have a load of other stuff in the works, but what shows up next is up in the air (probably not the 3 Super Heavy Panzers... ).

This message was edited 4 times. Last update was at 2017/05/01 13:32:42


 
   
Made in us
Wondering Why the Emperor Left





Some really great stuff here!
One question, if i may- what is the yellow material that you use in much of the construction?
(And I'm particularly glad to see someone moving away from the more absurd alt. history aspects that so much of the genre gets bogged down in.)
   
Made in eu
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

The yellow stuff's milliput. I'm really lazy when it comes to cutting plasticard, so usually keep a load of it spare for gap filling, or when I want to change the design later on (as was the case with that Panther LVT). Its a cheaper option than greenstuff for that purpose to be honest, well at least for filling. You can see it used for details in a few places, but I only really do that for big simple shapes as it really doesn't work all that well compared to greenstuff for that (those tracks on that Jagdpanther are milliput press fitted into a mold however).

Aye, and I'm not too into the werewolves and vampire stuff myself. Konflikt 47 seems like a waste of a concept. I've an E-10 an E-25 awaiting some paint, which're probably the most practical of the paper panzers conceived, but companies are intent to stick lasers on Panzer IVs instead.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2017/04/21 14:15:31


 
   
Made in us
Wondering Why the Emperor Left





Heh! I've been using white milliput for so long that I actually forgot there are other types!
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

I tried white milliput once, but I'm not sure what you'd use it for other than large sculptures. At 28mm scale its too expensive for using as a filler, and doesn't offer the same detail (at least the stuff I bought didn't) as stuff like greenstuff (though greenstuff obviously isn't the best at that either...).

Despite having made a load of models for this already, I'm still short of enough to fit into a 750 pts Bolt Action list. Now the guys around here are playing 1000pts as a minimum, eugh. At 750 I'm running four 8 man rifle squads, a 2nd Lieutenant, sniper team and a Panzer IV Ausf. J. With the remaining 250 I guess I can fit in maybe a squads of Volksgrenadiers armed with STG-44s in a Katzchen and a MMG team, or something along those lines. I wouldn't mind running casement mounted assault guns, but the Bolt Action rules make using them pointless other than for thematic value when you can buy a turreted version with an extra MG for a few more points.

...That's the supposed priority right now, though today I've been putting together terrain. I already have one ruined building, and have another 4 being made. They'll hopefully slot in with my warmer season Eastern-European terrain (the thawing snow theme's just an excuse to use that other terrain, rather than going full winter basing if anyone wondered) along with bits and bobs from my urban terrain sets, so I'll have enough for a board (most of that junk should be in my gallery FYI).

Spoiler:



 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

And some stuff from the Entwicklung series. These kits are all made by Die Waffenkammer.

E-10 Tank Destroyer


Part of the Entwicklung series, the E-10 was intended to replace the Panzer 38 (t) and similar lighter vehicles in the German arsenal. As with the series as a whole it shared commonality of parts with its larger cousins, with the chassis being functional enough to be extended into waffentrager variants, or with a turret mounted in order to serve in a reconnaissance function.

Spoiler:





E-25 Schützenpanzerwagen Ausf. A.


The E-Series were intended to act as a way of streamlining German Tank production. Besides being distributed across a select number of weight classes and functions, off-shoot vehicles, like this APC for example were envisioned.

Spoiler:





E-25 Tank Destroyer Ausf. A


Designed to replace Germany's medium Tanks and their derivatives, the E-25 packed a nasty punch for a vehicle just barely larger than the Czech Panzer 38(t).

Spoiler:




This is the only one I really messed about with, barring adding stowage. It has some Heer 46 Infra-Red sights, plasticard deck armour, schurzen and other bits of tat.

Spoiler:

 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Raketenspinne



One of the so called "Secrets of the Third Reich", the "Spinne" came out of a program to develop a specialised urban combat vehicle. A few were tested in central Russian, where they were supposed to be limited strictly to cities. In practice this could not be guaranteed, and due to the sensitive nature of the project they could not be simply left behind in the case of a retreat. On the open steppe their spindly legs faltered in the mud, even with ad-hoc snow shoes bolted on in the field.

Prior to his stroke the Fuhrer had called for much larger vehicles taking over a similar role to tanks to be built. Much like many other such projects these allegedly never left paper. The idea would later be resurfaced in a more functional format by the Luftwaffe as simple equipment carriers, though few were aware of their ancestry.

Spoiler:


A Clockwork Goblin Spinne walker from their Konflikt 47 range. There's a lot I'm not into with that thing, so I went ahead and swapped out some of the details, and well replaced the turret with a system similar to what the Germans were putting together near the end of the war.

Spoiler:

 
   
Made in gb
Regular Dakkanaut






UK

Oh HELL yes. Why haven't I stumbled on this before?!? Loads of great stuff here - colour me subbed.

Skinflint Games- war gaming in the age of austerity

www.skinflintgames.co.uk 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

I had this in the WWII board here, which, ah, I suppose might not have been so appropriate. ...You know with all the walking tanks and such.

 
   
Made in eu
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Updates, updates… 

"Cougar" Scout Car



Following the near disastrous landings at Yalta the Luftwaffe put in an urgent request for their paratroopers to have some heavier form of mobile fire support in the field. Multiple solutions were proposed for a vehicle light enough to be airdropped, but carrying an armament of some substance. Of them a few bore field testing.

The "Cougar" was in function a simplified variant of the Sd.Kfz 234 "Puma" armoured car. In order to meet the weight requirements four of the eight wheels were removed and the chassis shortened. Even with the changes the vehicle didn't meet the bar **, however production went ahead due to the short time frame in which it could be produced (with very few changes being required of the existing tooling).

Admittedly the Cougar carried the same inherent flaws as the Puma when dealing with the Russian winter, but filled a gap in the Fallschirmjäger's arsenal. Eventually further rounds of trials would result in a more capable vehicle for the role, though by then many Cougars were already in service. Their light construction wouldn't serve the line well later in life, with them being less capable of upgunning than their larger parent, but some did see use (as with many of Germany's obsolete equipment) in secondary theatres.

** Presumably aiming for something in line with the 3 ton Universal Carrier. The Puma came in at over 10 tons. For comparison the M113, designed for a similar role, weighs 12 tons. ...Yeah, some number fudging was required in this case.

Spoiler:


A Warlord Puma with a few of the wheels lopped off.

The Puma as a 4x4 doesn't look that bad to be honest. Obviously its not kitted out for a muddy quagmire, but well, sticking tracks on the thing would be a bit questionable... As for the concept, I suppose its a simple solution for the problem proposed, rather than going down the lines of designing a tankette like the real German military did post-war.

I'd imagine that its competitors during development would've looked similar to those larger autonomous tracked mines the Germans were using late in the war (similar in function to the Goliath, and they did prototype some armed Borgward IVs - not just those ad-hoc ones used at Berlin). A project for another day perhaps.

Spoiler:


Hummel SPG



Whilst the Panzer III/ IV would soon see obsolescence with the E-series, the transition wasn’t immediate. Older designs, such as the Hummel continued to see service with some modification.
Later runs of the Hummel included an armoured roof to fully enclose the cab against enemy grenades and also deal with the harsh Russian winter. The gun itself is a later model, including a muzzle break (which due to the periscopic sites didn’t impact the gunner’s view as much as other German vehicles).


Spoiler:


I bought this yonks ago and forgot about it, intending to turn it into a mount for the kugelblitz. Instead I addressed the issue the real Hummel (and similar SPGs) had and gave the thing a roof ...which also deals with the whole freezing cold temperatures thing. Post-war the 10.5 had a muzzle break stuck on it, so I just pulled one off of a 1/48th kit.
Spoiler:


Opel Maultier Ambulance



Well, they stuck tracks onto trucks to make them more suitable for the crap roads ...how about sticking on some extra armour as well when using the truck in this ad-hoc role?

Spoiler:


I've been a bit tired of waiting on Rubicon releasing their Opel Maultier, so just stuck on some 251 tracks onto a Rubicon Opel Blitz. They don't look quite right (the real things mostly used bits from tankettes), but whatever. Originally just the cab had armour on it till I felt bad for the patients.

Spoiler:


Fallschirmjäger



Spiel... 1950s paras.

Clockwork Goblin's German infantry are a lot nicer than their vehicles. The metal's software enough that cutting off the jetpacks wasn't too much of an issue, and barring just gap filling these're pretty much out of the box. Tsk, I should have added a bipod to one of the FG-42s (I think in practice they were supposed to be used as rifles, but one was issued for the MG role - which oddly enough post-war is what the American derivative was used for). I don't think that the real paras never did drop with those rifles though, I guess as the designers thought the guys would eventually go back to being paratroopers instead of regular infantry (post-war the StG-44 was used by other nation's paras, maybe due to more being captured).


Next will hopefully be 16 Heer46 Kharkov SS, so I can actually play a game of Bolt Action. Besides them there’s that other truck from the WIP shot above sitting base coated. I’m working on two different radio controlled mines as well, with the smaller “Springer” being a priority as I said I’d finish it for a pledge over on the Bolt Action Facebook page. We’ll see what happens (the Springer will need to be mostly scratch built compared to the

 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

From the WIP pile...

I threw this pair together today. Two of Company B's new E-50 Ausf M heavy tanks.



And they are rather large...



No, really large:



Yeah...

The E-50 was a Tiger II with a different road wheel arrangement, slightly altered glacis, and the schmalturm turret which had been destined for the next generation of Panther. The Ausf. M's a fictional variant with a larger turret, extended engine bay and tracks and a larger gun (thus its size compared to that converted Warlord Tiger II above).

Company B's planning on making a few variants, include an E-75 and a Jagd version, which I'll be picking up. Seeing as the Germans were going to do away with all of their armoured vehicles for a handful of these type of vehicle (the so called Entwicklung series, which is pretty much what the world went on to do post war) that's my excuse to buy a fair few of these things. Die Waffemhammer also makes the lighter E-Series tanks, as I've shown here before, which I have another order in with at the moment as well.

Anyhow, there's other WIP stuff in my gallery, but I'll post more painted junk here over the week - particularly a pair Mine Clearance vehicles.

 
   
Made in ca
Never Forget Isstvan!






Canada,Prince Edward Island

Fantastic conversions and even better painting Wyramlla!

The weather effects and battle damage are so realistic that they could be the real thing.

Looking forward to the minesweeper!

   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

"Have I weathered this vehicle enough", the answer's always no until the thing's completely black, then its a case of applying enough white washes till its passable...

I threw these together today as well (long weekend here)

A Jagdtiger, but based on the Tiger I chassis (the gun's a 1/48th 88mm, but I'd say in 1/58th its a long 105mm. Yes, it does look huge so I may swap it out).



And a captured T-34/85 with some heavy field modifications. The Germans actually did carry out similar changes themselves (changing the commander's cupola was favoured), though I've only really seen the excessive number of tracks as armour on Panzer IVs and Shermans (which they dubbed "dragon scales"). Personally I just made this so I have more models to play games with, as well, all the heavy tanks cost a silly amount...


 
   
Made in gb
Stealthy Warhound Titan Princeps





Earlobe deep in doo doo

Always a good reason enjoying the exploration and logic behind this. Sucker for decent alternate history although I do miss the Nazi Apemen

"But me no buts! Our comrades get hurt. Our friends die. Falkenburg is a knight who swore an oath to serve the church and to defend the weak. He'd be the first to tell you to stop puling and start planning. Because what we are doing-at risk to ourselves-is what we have sworn to do. The West relies on us. It is a risk we take with pride. It is an oath we honour. Even when some soft southern burgher mutters about us, we know the reason he sleeps soft and comfortable, why his wife is able to complain about the price of cabbages as her most serious problem and why his children dare to throw dung and yell "Knot" when we pass. It's because we are what we are. For all our faults we stand for law and light.
Von Gherens This Rough Magic Lackey, Flint & Freer
Mekagorkalicious -Monkeytroll
2017 Model Count-71 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Personally I'm really not into the "weird" side of alt-history which seems to hijack every wargame which has came out in the past few years. I had hopes that Konflikt 47 would play things straight, being that Bolt Action isn't too unrealistic and I'd heard that Warlord were making some late-war tanks like the IS-3 and Centurion. What it turned out to be was something similar to DUST, whilst ignoring pretty much all the real world developments apart from a token T-44 at the back of the Soviet's army list.

Nah, I'm fine with bonkers designs which would never be practical, but want to stray far from zombies and laser guns. The Power Armoured soldiers and walker which I posted earlier just showed up for the hell of it, and well even in the fluff descriptions which I've given them they're in no way practical. The book which I used as a start for the background does infer the "weird" stuff, though even then its only as a token bit right at the end in the late 50s.

So this stuff here's clearly nonsensical for how things would've gone, however its a wargame, so it doesn't have to be. If I have the time I want to make a T-14 Heavy Tank for the British, if that's any indication of how silly this whole thread actually is.

Spoiler:

I'll give you a Super Sherman...

jpg


Anyhow, I have the two E-50 Ausf.Ms , Beutepanzer T-34/85 and Jagdtiger I being painted now along with 16 SS in parkas, one Borgward IV and a NSU Springer mine clearing vehicle, along with a SWS Cargo Truck on my painting table at the moment. The tanks will take a bit longer, but hopefully the rest should be finished soon-ish (I say that, as well, I've had that lot being painted for a while now, and I tend to prioritise tanks over every else). Just because they're new I'd like to have at least one of the E-50s painted to stick on social media just to give Company B some more advertisement (as well, the more people who buy them, the more chance that Brent who runs the place will devote time to this strictly personal project. He only made the things in the first place because me and some other folks asked him to... Ah, which is to say if nobody else buys them then I guess I'll need to pick up another few...).


 
   
Made in gb
Stealthy Warhound Titan Princeps





Earlobe deep in doo doo

Yeah funnily enough I'm not really into true historical modelling myself but I've always rather liked the idea of Imagi-nations I'm currently joking about using Latverians in various Napoleonic games....

"But me no buts! Our comrades get hurt. Our friends die. Falkenburg is a knight who swore an oath to serve the church and to defend the weak. He'd be the first to tell you to stop puling and start planning. Because what we are doing-at risk to ourselves-is what we have sworn to do. The West relies on us. It is a risk we take with pride. It is an oath we honour. Even when some soft southern burgher mutters about us, we know the reason he sleeps soft and comfortable, why his wife is able to complain about the price of cabbages as her most serious problem and why his children dare to throw dung and yell "Knot" when we pass. It's because we are what we are. For all our faults we stand for law and light.
Von Gherens This Rough Magic Lackey, Flint & Freer
Mekagorkalicious -Monkeytroll
2017 Model Count-71 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Well when I started this I said to myself that I'm not a historical player. I've actually shelved some of the infantry already as there's very little which sets them apart from real world period German infantry (not to say I won't use them, nor that they aren't actually realistic even for alt-history games, they just don't look daft enough). Thus why I went for the guys wearing body armour and carrying assault rifles. I realised though that yes, guys with fancy equipment are nice, but for actually playing games I can't dump down one E-50 and two squads of guys. So instead I now have a bunch of those SS in parkas. They're "historical", though unusual enough to suit my liking. If I can get away with it I'll be making more guys with assault rifles though...

The big issue which I'll need to contend with is playing games with every else's armies. I choose a fuzzy 1945-55 kind of period for the army to justify why the other side would be armed purely with WWII tech, and that the Germans are stationed off in the middle of nowhere to cover just why there'd still be older stuff chucking about next to super heavy tanks with infra red sights... I floated the idea of giving my opponents some alt-history models to play with, though I don't see that going down to well (most people like playing with their own stuff, and the guys who're into the setting don't play 28mm), but've decided to keep this as just a vanity project.

Not to go off on one too much... My club's having their AGM tomorrow, so I'll need to see if people are finally getting around to organising a wargaming show around these parts again (we used to have the largest in the country). What might wind up happening if that goes ahead is I cave to what people have been prodding at my about for years and just use my models for display games ...as I've more than enough fancy models and terrain to fill 5 or 6 tables (yeah, its kind of sad that one 24 year old has that much stuff, ah, but well ...I really don't like using other people's stuff to play with if I can avoid it... Hmn, on that note, I've a crap ton of winter terrain to paint for this as well).

 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

E-50 Ausf.M

Spoiler:


In 1945 the German's plan was to replace all tank development with a handful of vehicles. The E-50 was the lighter of the two main battle tanks, intended to replace the Panther and Tiger I tanks. In simple terms it was a Tiger II with a simplified track assembly and the Panther's Schmalturm turret.

This is an entirely fictional variant of the E-50 from World of Tanks. It includes a much larger gun and a rear transmission (necessitating a longer rear section). My head canon for the thing is that it was a compromise between the E-50/ 75 to further streamline production. The model itself is made by Company B, with some stowage made by DieWaffenkammer and Rubicon.

Spoiler:


Beutepanzer T-34/85

Spoiler:


Having all the flashy stuff is nice, but I need some lighter tanks so I can actually play games...

A Rubicon T-34/85 with a turret bustle from a Warlord Panzer IV, side skirts off a Rubicon Panther and stowage, as ever, by DieWaffenkammer and Rubicon.

Spoiler:


Schwerer Wehmachtschelepper

Spoiler:


The sWS was another child of the streamlining process which was taking place at the end of the war. It was designed to replace the heavier trucks, and based off of the 7 ton truck chassis. Some did see service at the end of the war, but serious production didn't make it off of the ground.

This however is based on a 5 ton Rubicon Sd.Kfz 251 truck. ...Because the book of Doyle's which I saw it in first didn't bother to mention what chassis it was derived from. I'll make a proper one when Rubicon come out with their 7 tonner.

Spoiler:


Borgward IV Ausf.D

Spoiler:


The replacement for the Goliath mine clearance vehicle, the Borgward IV had a human driver, with an explosive mounted at the front which could be dropped at the target; allowing for the vehicle to be re-used - cutting down production costs. In the real world they wound up being converted into gun carriers late in the war, with some seeing service in Berlin.

A Warlord Borgward Wanze with its rocket launcher removed to return it to its original configuration.

Spoiler:


NSU Springer

Spoiler:


he NSU Springer was to be the replacement for the Goliath and Borgward IV mine clearance vehicles. Carrying a larger quantity of explosives than the Goliath, but being cheaper to manufacture than the Borgward IV. It would be driven as close to its target as was safe, before the driver dismounted - closed off the crew compartment's shutters - where then it would be radio controlled to the target (those which were built required line of sight, though a video camera was planned to put the controller at less risk).

Just a lump of plasticard. I had a Kettenkrad (which the Springer uses parts of) to hand, so it didn't take much to just base the measurements off that and churn this out in a few hours.

Spoiler:



In other news, my next project's a Ho-Ri II Tank Destroyer, a Japanese paper panzer. I already have the two which I posted here earlier, and have wanted to make a Chi-Ri for a while now. I CBA at this second making a turret, so have gone for the casement mounted gun variant of it instead (well one of them, there were two actually). I don't plan on making a Japanese force, but maybe Bolt Action Tank Wars group could work. ...I'm suddenly stricken with the need to make some IJA soldiers with Assault Rifles riding in a Type 1 Ho-Ki APC to support the armour. Dammit!

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2017/06/04 01:03:17


 
   
Made in gb
Stealthy Warhound Titan Princeps





Earlobe deep in doo doo

Going well I see. Yep the opponent problem for the more esoteric stuff is real. Fortunately I'm mainly a swords and sorcery fantasy kind of guy so theres a lot of options for bodging forces together. I'll wish you luck on the show as well.

"But me no buts! Our comrades get hurt. Our friends die. Falkenburg is a knight who swore an oath to serve the church and to defend the weak. He'd be the first to tell you to stop puling and start planning. Because what we are doing-at risk to ourselves-is what we have sworn to do. The West relies on us. It is a risk we take with pride. It is an oath we honour. Even when some soft southern burgher mutters about us, we know the reason he sleeps soft and comfortable, why his wife is able to complain about the price of cabbages as her most serious problem and why his children dare to throw dung and yell "Knot" when we pass. It's because we are what we are. For all our faults we stand for law and light.
Von Gherens This Rough Magic Lackey, Flint & Freer
Mekagorkalicious -Monkeytroll
2017 Model Count-71 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

And I've bothered to make banner for this. ...All my blogs need banners, this one felt sort of left out.

That's some premium quality GIMP skills there folks.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2017/06/05 19:19:10


 
   
Made in gb
Fixture of Dakka






Glasgow, Scotland

Katzchen



Another Katzchen, this time by Die Waffenkammer. With the new UK retailer I wanted to dump some cash as support, and well have an order in with Heer 46 for their Katzchen as well. I'll compare the two whenever the other shows up.

Spoiler:
[spoiler]
[/spoiler]



Panther II



Yup, another of these. Not as heavily armoured as the first, though I like the look of the thing, so wanted another. ...Whether I make yet another is conjecture.

Spoiler:




And finally.

Maus Mk.1



One of the few Super Heavy tanks to see production in any numbers, the Maus entered service under insistence of the Fuhrer himself. The history of the Maus was more politicing than engineering, as Hitler and Speer were at loggerheads over the viability of the whole project.

The Mk.1 was quickly replaced by the Mk.2, though neither were entirely practical. In the field they were nigh useless in open battle, liable to breakdowns and with their slow speed mitigating any protection the inch thick armour provided. Most were eventually relegated to defensive positions in counter offensives, or even turned into ad-hoc bunkers rather than being the unstoppable behemoths which Hitler had envisioned.
This is a particularly rare example of a Mk.1 which remained in field service, though it was quickly abandoned by the crew following the retreat from the besieged city of Kamenaka. Similar to other German heavy tanks, the Soviets typically didn't bother pressing them into their own service, the Maus being far inferior to their own heavy tanks in terms of general battlefield use, regardless of its formidability.

Spoiler:


God I hate the Maus. The thing is very of its time, more of a propoganda piece and wishful thinking than something which'd ever had survived on the front lines. Its a staple of the period and the alt-history setting, so I had to buy one, I don't have to like it though... Maybe I should have just turned it into a bunker?

A Blitzkrieg 1/56th Maus. I was going to pick up one of these eventually; Warlord coming out with there's seemed like the right excuse. Warlord's looks like the better of the two models, but well, it was out of stock when I originally bought this. I lost some of the bits, so had to give it an autocannon instead of a 75mm for its co-ax mount, though I suppose that could be counted as a field modification. Stowage is by Diewaffenkammer. The commander is a 1/48th Tamiya Greyhound crewman, with a Warlord Tiger commander head and a winter coat added (looking like a battleship captain...).


Going from one of the largest German tanks, here's one of the smallest - the Panzerkleinzerstörer "Rutscher".



The Rutscher was a late war concept. Originally the idea was that the enemy's guns would always be becomming better, so why bother trying to protect against them? Instead how about sticking the most competative gun (twin PAW-600 firing HEAT rounds - only 250 of the crew served variant being built by the end of the war - which I intend to make as well) onto the lightest chassis possible? The concept later resurfaced as an alternative to the US Hellcat, though with the oversight that the Hellcat had a turret...



This one's made in the style of the 7-10 variant, being built off of a 1/72nd Panther. It was part of the E-series, so commonly misnamed an E-5. Rather the production model was supposed to be 3.5 tons - where built from custom parts, but this is the heavier model - made from existing resources.

Yeah, and it is tiny. Smaller than an E-10.




 
   
 
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