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Made in us
Napoleonics Obsesser




MN

Since the beginning of the month, my mind has been swirling a lot lately. I have seen these ideas culminate in a few different wargame designs or partial wargame designs and I wanted to chat a bit about what was on my mind, but also find out what has been filling your head/game designs lately....

1. Action Economy- Basically each model has a different level of skill. That skill dictates how many actions they get in a turn. Therefore, Heroes can do more than veterans or rookies.

2. Detection mechanics- How does an enemy "see" another enemy to engage them? How can they move with stealth? How can they be discovered?

3. Hero vs Minion- Ways to simply and easily differentiate the stars from the extras in your games (see also Action economy)

4. LOS as a Resource- How to use access to light/sensors/detection or other items to make LOS a game resource (see also Detection)

Genres that I keep revisiting are: Ancients, Urban Fantasy, Naval, Aerial combat.

So, what has been swirling in your brain lately?

Do you like Free Wargames?
http://bloodandspectacles.blogspot.com/ 
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut






Main one for me is akin to your #2, detection mechanics. I've been contemplating the best way to incorporate invisible units in such a way that one player knows where it is, the other doesn't, and there's no scope for cheating. Shy of the boring old "write it down" option, I'm drawing something of a blank.

I am also trying to work out AI for co-op games, with minimal tables involved, which is really quite difficult.

Genre-wise, I keep bouncing between horror, space, exploration and post-apocalyptic.


Orks in 8th, W/D/L
9/0/3 
   
Made in fi
Longtime Dakkanaut






Invisible units are a bit of a pain, truly. One could turn to boardgames like Scotland Yard's fugitive on the run or War of the Ring's ringbearer for inspiration, but even there it's mostly "be honest about where you're going and reveal the current position every few moves".

I've been procrastinating on two larger projects, one large scale hex'n'counter hell representing the Siege of Vraks (millions of men, artillery and lots of logistics in the mud) and one smaller Space Hulk redux to answer my frustrations with the dungeon delving board game genre in general.

The Vraks project is stuck with finding suitable mechanics to both move huge numbers of distinct units and materiel about without giving all players full information while forcing them to choose between bad choices as orders from above dictate without turning the game into a boring slog that takes ages to merely maintain. Might incorporate varying scales for different rounds, like having a "grand turn" of strategical logistics and then a several tactical rounds of operations at the front to pace the game.

The X-Hulk ChaosQuest II: Electric Boogaloo (working title ) in turn is a smaller rpg-lite, where the main draw will be to have the players in a situation more similar to Chaos Gate than your usual dungeon delver in that they have X units of time, men and equipment to push through a short campaign and how they allocate those is up to them. You might have a space hulk that needs to be rerouted and getting that done might require, say, 5-10 missions where in each instance they get a choice of 2-3 operations. Fog of war is heavy, you know your objectives and general layout of the place, but all sorts of details and curveballs will be flying in your face as they start going in. Conserving your men and weapons or even retreating from some missions instead of always throwing lives to win this particular skirmish within strict time limits, that sort of thing.

Heavily converted tall scaled 30k / 40k loyalist Death Guard blog here, C&C welcome https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/717557.page
Now with titans! Legio Favilla walks! 
   
Made in au
Cocky Macross Mayor





Adelaide Australia

 Easy E wrote:
Since the beginning of the month, my mind has been swirling a lot lately. I have seen these ideas culminate in a few different wargame designs or partial wargame designs and I wanted to chat a bit about what was on my mind, but also find out what has been filling your head/game designs lately....

4. LOS as a Resource- How to use access to light/sensors/detection or other items to make LOS a game resource (see also Detection)


That's a thought. LOS is commonly an either/or function, but describing it as a resource that you must 'earn' and can 'spend' is an interesting angle. In the age of missiles, this could be characterised as 'Lock On' (which requires a certain kind of LOS, depending on the weapon), but as a general quality, it has some interesting applications.

Maybe it could be used to do away with hidden movement. Purely as an example in a setting, I visualise a soldier trying to draw a bead down his rifle on an enemy soldier who is advancing across broken terrain. If the soldier is also advancing, darting through cover, he cannot earn LOS, even if (switch to tabletop mode here, with us looking down on miniatures of the combatants), the enemy is in LOS from figure to figure. But, if he stops, he earns LOS, and can see the enemy. Declaring he is aiming might earn more LOS. Finally, he can spend his LOS, and take his shot, even if the enemy is still ducking and diving through cover. The soldier has earned his shot, because he is waiting for the right moment, sacrificing his movement and safety for the chance to cash in his LOS.

There's no need to record hidden movement because the emphasis is on the ability of the attacker to detect their target, not on the target's ability to hide. (And certainly not on the player's ability to place their miniature behind a convenient model tree, etc.)

Hobbies from Other Dimensions!
www.miniaturemartin,com 
   
Made in us
Painting Within the Lines




Seattle, WA USA

@Easy and @Macrossmartin, that is a really interesting idea. I could also see that method reducing some of the ambiguity arguments that are really prevalent in "True LOS" type systems (which I dislike) without the need for lots of rules for things like model volume, size classes, etc. Could either just be a modifier on either how LOS tokens are earned, or on a "LOS Check" roll or similar.

Hm. Something to think about for yet another game in the backlog.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2020/05/21 16:01:47


 
   
Made in us
Napoleonics Obsesser




MN

Managing LOS could be a better way to handle "invisible units" as well?

Do you like Free Wargames?
http://bloodandspectacles.blogspot.com/ 
   
Made in us
Painting Within the Lines




Seattle, WA USA

 Easy E wrote:
Managing LOS could be a better way to handle "invisible units" as well?
Quite possibly.
   
 
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