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Made in us
Dakka Veteran





SeanDrake wrote:


Yeah but those marines were in a more expensive material and hand made as opposed to mass produced plastic. If you want to compare those marines then the odd remaining metal marine is around £15 so an 500% increase.




Ever wonder how much a metal mold and a plastic mold - and the other equipment - work out to? There's a reason characters stayed metal longer than the troops. Making a plastic model costs more to start.

My WHFB armies were Bretonians and Tomb Kings. 
   
Made in hr
Regular Dakkanaut





 G00fySmiley wrote:
 FezzikDaBullgryn wrote:
Time to shell out the $200 for that 3d printer....



10/10 highly reccomend. with the right settings a $200 printer can make models pretty close to GW quality. for $500 you can get one that does every bit the same detail as GW models




3d printed model...nuff said
   
Made in ch
Potent Possessed Daemonvessel





Impressive. Probably should then invest there.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
Spoiler:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
 wuestenfux wrote:
I just know as a kid or young person now, they've been completely priced out of the hobby - again without an influx of mommy/daddy cash. What high schooler will go and pay $60 for a box of ten Space Marines when $60 still gets you a full computer/Xbox/PS4 game? GW is on a roll now, but I suspect in 10-15 years there may be a reckoning. GW probably makes most of its money from 30-40 somethings with expendable income. In a decade or more, that base may not exist if they keep going bananas on this stuff. I'm already out, but I don't see many replacements coming up behind.

This is just one branch into the future - kids are priced out and the base of 30-40 years old is vanishing.
Seems reasonable, but the situation in our gaming group is different.
Players around 20 years old enter the hobby and the older guys are still there and dont show the slightest inclination to move away.
I wonder is that more of a reflection of Germany as a whole rather than just your gaming group. I'm not completely clued in the current economic status of Germany, but aren't you guys pretty much smashing it at the moment? My point being that in a strong economy with an enriched workforce and plenty of disposable income, Games-Workshop probably won't see too many sales drop off following a price rise, but in places where money's more tight, it probably won't take much for consumers to find something more affordable to buy with their hard earned.


If that were true, which it isn't, switzerland would be a gigantic relative market, altough the only Shop near me stated that ever since 7th the ammount of sales of 40k didn't nearly reach the levels beforehand.
Perhaps the Swiss just aren't interested in Warhammer? I'm sure there are also cultural reasons why some hobbies are more popular than others. In Ireland, for instance, which is a generally wealthy country, Warhammer always struggled to catch on in my town; the Irish, it seems, are only interested in football, Gaelic football, video games and drinking. Anything else is looked upon as suspicious and outlandish. Whereas here in Vietnam - a country that's only recently begun to develop a middle class, the hobby is burgeoning - at least in the two major cities - seemingly because the Vietnamese rarely judge each other on their hobbies.

Besides, if the Swiss outdoors are as beautiful as they look, and I lived there, I wouldn't be bothering with this nerdy gak either.


ehh the cultural argument doesn't really work. and if you have lived a decent time here you would realise that beyond the political cultures and belives (e.g direct democraticy, legtimacy before legality and just in general a distaste for homogenic structures.) that under the line you still have an alpine southern germanic infront of you or southern french, or northern italian.

then again your average worker in switzerland has to make do with a lot less then the statistics state. (i wish i had the statistically 250'000 CHF on my bank account..... ) but it isn't as if the german state would not have similarly inflated statistics.
So if neither economics, nor culture can explain why Warhammer is popular in some places, but not in others, what can explain it?


Availability and pricing.

Switzerland has one Partner Shop of GW, since gw never bothered to establish itself here.

Pricing, well take the questionable £>€ pricing, add another 20% even though you won't get 1.2 chf for 1€ and your basic box of CSM clocks in at 56.50 chf.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2019/07/05 07:47:13


https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/0/766717.page

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Well, 3D printing counteracts the price increases.
Less and less models will be sold in the future.

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Made in ch
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 wuestenfux wrote:
Well, 3D printing counteracts the price increases.
Less and less models will be sold in the future.


I mean sure, but if the pricing of GW miniatures wouldn't be so astronomical, how many people would actually bother with 3D printing?

My guess would be a lot less.
Incidentaly the same is true for recasters. This would really lower the rate of these if the prices for fw /gw models would be lower.

Would it go away? Na. But it would be a non issue.
Infact it would probably have the same effect as piracy has shown to have for gaming, as a propper Demo.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2019/07/05 07:54:06


https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/0/766717.page

A Mostly Renegades and Heretics blog.
_______________________________

Who would win:
10'000 + years of veterancy, or some raidy Boys?
(Not Online in regards to the new Red Corsair battalion CP boost.) 
   
Made in gb
Longtime Dakkanaut






Breton wrote:
SeanDrake wrote:


Yeah but those marines were in a more expensive material and hand made as opposed to mass produced plastic. If you want to compare those marines then the odd remaining metal marine is around £15 so an 500% increase.




Ever wonder how much a metal mold and a plastic mold - and the other equipment - work out to? There's a reason characters stayed metal longer than the troops. Making a plastic model costs more to start.


None of that actually matters to what I was talking about regarding the inflation excuse for GW’s extortionate price rises, I was just pointing out the obvious fact that you cannot compare the original metals to modern plastics, you need to compare metals to metals and plastics to plastics if you must make excuses/comparisons for GW.

As for your question I am aware metal moulds are cheaper than hips moulds but also that the hips moulds last much longer and can be used for mass production. Again though i’m not sure that is relevant to using inflation as an excuse for massively above inflation price rises.

Your last point is especially laughable and comical, because not only the 7th ed Valkyrie shown dumber things (like being able to throw the troopers without parachutes out of its hatches, no harm done) - Irbis 
   
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Hanoi, Vietnam.

Not Online!!! wrote:
Impressive. Probably should then invest there.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
Spoiler:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
 wuestenfux wrote:
I just know as a kid or young person now, they've been completely priced out of the hobby - again without an influx of mommy/daddy cash. What high schooler will go and pay $60 for a box of ten Space Marines when $60 still gets you a full computer/Xbox/PS4 game? GW is on a roll now, but I suspect in 10-15 years there may be a reckoning. GW probably makes most of its money from 30-40 somethings with expendable income. In a decade or more, that base may not exist if they keep going bananas on this stuff. I'm already out, but I don't see many replacements coming up behind.

This is just one branch into the future - kids are priced out and the base of 30-40 years old is vanishing.
Seems reasonable, but the situation in our gaming group is different.
Players around 20 years old enter the hobby and the older guys are still there and dont show the slightest inclination to move away.
I wonder is that more of a reflection of Germany as a whole rather than just your gaming group. I'm not completely clued in the current economic status of Germany, but aren't you guys pretty much smashing it at the moment? My point being that in a strong economy with an enriched workforce and plenty of disposable income, Games-Workshop probably won't see too many sales drop off following a price rise, but in places where money's more tight, it probably won't take much for consumers to find something more affordable to buy with their hard earned.


If that were true, which it isn't, switzerland would be a gigantic relative market, altough the only Shop near me stated that ever since 7th the ammount of sales of 40k didn't nearly reach the levels beforehand.
Perhaps the Swiss just aren't interested in Warhammer? I'm sure there are also cultural reasons why some hobbies are more popular than others. In Ireland, for instance, which is a generally wealthy country, Warhammer always struggled to catch on in my town; the Irish, it seems, are only interested in football, Gaelic football, video games and drinking. Anything else is looked upon as suspicious and outlandish. Whereas here in Vietnam - a country that's only recently begun to develop a middle class, the hobby is burgeoning - at least in the two major cities - seemingly because the Vietnamese rarely judge each other on their hobbies.

Besides, if the Swiss outdoors are as beautiful as they look, and I lived there, I wouldn't be bothering with this nerdy gak either.


ehh the cultural argument doesn't really work. and if you have lived a decent time here you would realise that beyond the political cultures and belives (e.g direct democraticy, legtimacy before legality and just in general a distaste for homogenic structures.) that under the line you still have an alpine southern germanic infront of you or southern french, or northern italian.

then again your average worker in switzerland has to make do with a lot less then the statistics state. (i wish i had the statistically 250'000 CHF on my bank account..... ) but it isn't as if the german state would not have similarly inflated statistics.
So if neither economics, nor culture can explain why Warhammer is popular in some places, but not in others, what can explain it?


Availability and pricing.

Switzerland has one Partner Shop of GW, since gw never bothered to establish itself here.

Pricing, well take the questionable £>€ pricing, add another 20% even though you won't get 1.2 chf for 1€ and your basic box of CSM clocks in at 56.50 chf.
Then how do you explain the discrepancy between it's popularity in Vietnam and Ireland? Citadel miniatures are both readily available in Ireland (we share a land border with the UK), and are a lot more affordable as a proportion of average income, yet struggle to gain popularity, yet in Vietnam - which has 2 stockists nationally, and a much lower average income - the hobby is more popular than I ever experienced at home.
   
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That would be an ecumenical matter.

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Breton wrote:
SeanDrake wrote:


Yeah but those marines were in a more expensive material and hand made as opposed to mass produced plastic. If you want to compare those marines then the odd remaining metal marine is around £15 so an 500% increase.




Ever wonder how much a metal mold and a plastic mold - and the other equipment - work out to? There's a reason characters stayed metal longer than the troops. Making a plastic model costs more to start.


actually the funny part there is that it is getting cheaper and cheaper to do injection molded plastics. also if you design the models in a digital form you can print the "origional" to make the mold multiple times without worry of degradation. Heck you cna even 3d print functional molds right out if you want to go that route.

https://www.3dhubs.com/knowledge-base/3d-printing-low-run-injection-molds

smurfORnot wrote:
 G00fySmiley wrote:
 FezzikDaBullgryn wrote:
Time to shell out the $200 for that 3d printer....



10/10 highly reccomend. with the right settings a $200 printer can make models pretty close to GW quality. for $500 you can get one that does every bit the same detail as GW models




3d printed model...nuff said


looks great! I have been churning out some custom counts as mega nobz once I finish painting them will probably post up. I even did a model for ghaz worthy of the character for a friend, he is basically the size of the front of a battlewagon, can't wait to see how he paints him.

10000 points 7000
6000
5000
5000
2000
 
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran





SeanDrake wrote:


None of that actually matters to what I was talking about regarding the inflation excuse for GW’s extortionate price rises, I was just pointing out the obvious fact that you cannot compare the original metals to modern plastics, you need to compare metals to metals and plastics to plastics if you must make excuses/comparisons for GW.

As for your question I am aware metal moulds are cheaper than hips moulds but also that the hips moulds last much longer and can be used for mass production. Again though i’m not sure that is relevant to using inflation as an excuse for massively above inflation price rises.


So the metal being more expensive than plastic matters, but changing up the moulds - and that production cost - does not?

Yeah but those marines were in a more expensive material and hand made as opposed to mass produced plastic


That is relevant, and you don't get to claim metal models are more expensive because metal prices, but plastic is cheaper because moulds don't count.

My WHFB armies were Bretonians and Tomb Kings. 
   
Made in se
Fresh-Faced New User




Breton wrote:
SeanDrake wrote:


None of that actually matters to what I was talking about regarding the inflation excuse for GW’s extortionate price rises, I was just pointing out the obvious fact that you cannot compare the original metals to modern plastics, you need to compare metals to metals and plastics to plastics if you must make excuses/comparisons for GW.

As for your question I am aware metal moulds are cheaper than hips moulds but also that the hips moulds last much longer and can be used for mass production. Again though i’m not sure that is relevant to using inflation as an excuse for massively above inflation price rises.


So the metal being more expensive than plastic matters, but changing up the moulds - and that production cost - does not?

Yeah but those marines were in a more expensive material and hand made as opposed to mass produced plastic


That is relevant, and you don't get to claim metal models are more expensive because metal prices, but plastic is cheaper because moulds don't count.


If a metal mould costs 10$ and must be redone after 10 casts it will cost 1$/cast for 10,10k and 100k. So the price of it would always be relevant.

A plastic mould might cost 100x more but would never have to be replaced. After 1000 casts its the same cost as the metal mould but after 10k casts its 1/10 and at GWs size it isnt hard for them to get to that break even number or pass it with a mile. For GW who is the biggest producer on the market the startup cost of those moulds isnt what is important. Its that they can use that same mould thousands of times since they are so big that the cost for each cast will in the end be much lower than that of the metal moulds and stuff like labor costs, shipping, storage etc will be the majority of the production costs. Wouldnt surprise me if its easier to use the plastic moulds compared to the metal moulds even further decreasing the costs due to being much more efficient as well.

For a smaller company plastic might increase costs for the consumer as a trade off for having easier to work with materials instead of metal. I think PP or some other company said that was a reason they used plastic more even if it didnt make stuff cheaper. This isnt true for GW as they produce enough to offset the costs of plastic. Just look at some of their older plastic kits that have been produced for around15to 20 years. The molds for those kits were expensive then but right now the average cost for each cast is almost nothing.

Their old metal models and the modern plastic might look comparable in price at a quick glance but the production cost today is way way lower than back then. We should have prices more in line with electronics. Each generation they become much better and cheaper. Our plastic models get slightly better over time but also more expensive even if they are cheaper than ever to make.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2019/07/06 17:04:45


 
   
Made in ie
Regular Dakkanaut





 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
Impressive. Probably should then invest there.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
Spoiler:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
 wuestenfux wrote:
I just know as a kid or young person now, they've been completely priced out of the hobby - again without an influx of mommy/daddy cash. What high schooler will go and pay $60 for a box of ten Space Marines when $60 still gets you a full computer/Xbox/PS4 game? GW is on a roll now, but I suspect in 10-15 years there may be a reckoning. GW probably makes most of its money from 30-40 somethings with expendable income. In a decade or more, that base may not exist if they keep going bananas on this stuff. I'm already out, but I don't see many replacements coming up behind.

This is just one branch into the future - kids are priced out and the base of 30-40 years old is vanishing.
Seems reasonable, but the situation in our gaming group is different.
Players around 20 years old enter the hobby and the older guys are still there and dont show the slightest inclination to move away.
I wonder is that more of a reflection of Germany as a whole rather than just your gaming group. I'm not completely clued in the current economic status of Germany, but aren't you guys pretty much smashing it at the moment? My point being that in a strong economy with an enriched workforce and plenty of disposable income, Games-Workshop probably won't see too many sales drop off following a price rise, but in places where money's more tight, it probably won't take much for consumers to find something more affordable to buy with their hard earned.


If that were true, which it isn't, switzerland would be a gigantic relative market, altough the only Shop near me stated that ever since 7th the ammount of sales of 40k didn't nearly reach the levels beforehand.
Perhaps the Swiss just aren't interested in Warhammer? I'm sure there are also cultural reasons why some hobbies are more popular than others. In Ireland, for instance, which is a generally wealthy country, Warhammer always struggled to catch on in my town; the Irish, it seems, are only interested in football, Gaelic football, video games and drinking. Anything else is looked upon as suspicious and outlandish. Whereas here in Vietnam - a country that's only recently begun to develop a middle class, the hobby is burgeoning - at least in the two major cities - seemingly because the Vietnamese rarely judge each other on their hobbies.

Besides, if the Swiss outdoors are as beautiful as they look, and I lived there, I wouldn't be bothering with this nerdy gak either.


ehh the cultural argument doesn't really work. and if you have lived a decent time here you would realise that beyond the political cultures and belives (e.g direct democraticy, legtimacy before legality and just in general a distaste for homogenic structures.) that under the line you still have an alpine southern germanic infront of you or southern french, or northern italian.

then again your average worker in switzerland has to make do with a lot less then the statistics state. (i wish i had the statistically 250'000 CHF on my bank account..... ) but it isn't as if the german state would not have similarly inflated statistics.
So if neither economics, nor culture can explain why Warhammer is popular in some places, but not in others, what can explain it?


Availability and pricing.

Switzerland has one Partner Shop of GW, since gw never bothered to establish itself here.

Pricing, well take the questionable £>€ pricing, add another 20% even though you won't get 1.2 chf for 1€ and your basic box of CSM clocks in at 56.50 chf.
Then how do you explain the discrepancy between it's popularity in Vietnam and Ireland? Citadel miniatures are both readily available in Ireland (we share a land border with the UK), and are a lot more affordable as a proportion of average income, yet struggle to gain popularity, yet in Vietnam - which has 2 stockists nationally, and a much lower average income - the hobby is more popular than I ever experienced at home.


Are you talking raw numbers or percentage of the population? Also, you'd be surprised how popular wargames ming is in Ireland. It's just most people play at home or in local clubs. The FLGS scene isn't a thing in Ireland, outside Dublin.
   
Made in us
Revving Ravenwing Biker




Hanoi, Vietnam.

Banville wrote:
Spoiler:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
Impressive. Probably should then invest there.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
Not Online!!! wrote:
 Ginjitzu wrote:
 wuestenfux wrote:
I just know as a kid or young person now, they've been completely priced out of the hobby - again without an influx of mommy/daddy cash. What high schooler will go and pay $60 for a box of ten Space Marines when $60 still gets you a full computer/Xbox/PS4 game? GW is on a roll now, but I suspect in 10-15 years there may be a reckoning. GW probably makes most of its money from 30-40 somethings with expendable income. In a decade or more, that base may not exist if they keep going bananas on this stuff. I'm already out, but I don't see many replacements coming up behind.

This is just one branch into the future - kids are priced out and the base of 30-40 years old is vanishing.
Seems reasonable, but the situation in our gaming group is different.
Players around 20 years old enter the hobby and the older guys are still there and dont show the slightest inclination to move away.
I wonder is that more of a reflection of Germany as a whole rather than just your gaming group. I'm not completely clued in the current economic status of Germany, but aren't you guys pretty much smashing it at the moment? My point being that in a strong economy with an enriched workforce and plenty of disposable income, Games-Workshop probably won't see too many sales drop off following a price rise, but in places where money's more tight, it probably won't take much for consumers to find something more affordable to buy with their hard earned.


If that were true, which it isn't, switzerland would be a gigantic relative market, altough the only Shop near me stated that ever since 7th the ammount of sales of 40k didn't nearly reach the levels beforehand.
Perhaps the Swiss just aren't interested in Warhammer? I'm sure there are also cultural reasons why some hobbies are more popular than others. In Ireland, for instance, which is a generally wealthy country, Warhammer always struggled to catch on in my town; the Irish, it seems, are only interested in football, Gaelic football, video games and drinking. Anything else is looked upon as suspicious and outlandish. Whereas here in Vietnam - a country that's only recently begun to develop a middle class, the hobby is burgeoning - at least in the two major cities - seemingly because the Vietnamese rarely judge each other on their hobbies.

Besides, if the Swiss outdoors are as beautiful as they look, and I lived there, I wouldn't be bothering with this nerdy gak either.


ehh the cultural argument doesn't really work. and if you have lived a decent time here you would realise that beyond the political cultures and belives (e.g direct democraticy, legtimacy before legality and just in general a distaste for homogenic structures.) that under the line you still have an alpine southern germanic infront of you or southern french, or northern italian.

then again your average worker in switzerland has to make do with a lot less then the statistics state. (i wish i had the statistically 250'000 CHF on my bank account..... ) but it isn't as if the german state would not have similarly inflated statistics.
So if neither economics, nor culture can explain why Warhammer is popular in some places, but not in others, what can explain it?


Availability and pricing.

Switzerland has one Partner Shop of GW, since gw never bothered to establish itself here.

Pricing, well take the questionable £>€ pricing, add another 20% even though you won't get 1.2 chf for 1€ and your basic box of CSM clocks in at 56.50 chf.
Then how do you explain the discrepancy between it's popularity in Vietnam and Ireland? Citadel miniatures are both readily available in Ireland (we share a land border with the UK), and are a lot more affordable as a proportion of average income, yet struggle to gain popularity, yet in Vietnam - which has 2 stockists nationally, and a much lower average income - the hobby is more popular than I ever experienced at home.


Are you talking raw numbers or percentage of the population? Also, you'd be surprised how popular wargames ming is in Ireland. It's just most people play at home or in local clubs. The FLGS scene isn't a thing in Ireland, outside Dublin.
Fair point. I'm probably not taking enough account of the MASSIVE difference in population sizes.
   
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Shame they never stuck an extra fiver on a box of plastic Howling Banshees or Warp Spiders.

Take a look at what I've been painting and modelling: https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/0/725222.page 
   
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I guess my question is, if you want people to buy the new stuff, you need to make it more appealing. You can do that one of two ways in this hobby:

1. Make the models cheaper
2. Make the units better rules-wise.

GW too the complete opposite approach and made the newer units inferior and then raised prices on older inventory they are trying to get rid of, because it's not making returns.

I don't understand it. Any frosh business major knows you don't attract sales of dead inventory by raising the cost.
   
Made in us
Awesome Autarch






But look at it this way.

GW has finite warehouse/storage and production space. Going forward their goal will be to replace/kill off older kits. The molds have long payed for themselves. The mold argument is no longer really relevant for 95% of the stuff GW produces. Back when they were a smaller company run by geeks, etc. it was a consideration, particularly in the early days of plastics. Now, any figure they produce will easily make back their mold cost.

So the old and less interesting kits are just icing on the cake really. If they sell them, good. If not...eh, kill the kit off in a few years and replace it. Couple this with GW going from strength to strength and they barely need to worry about it. A new player who dives into the game doesn't have a bit of concern or knowledge over how old a kit is. To them, it's brand new and awesome. A brand new player doesn't see a difference between a Primaris kit and a box of five Dire Avengers (which used to be cheaper...for double the models). It's non-factor to them. Older players aren't buying them, but mainly because they already own them.

If GW can price hike old kits and people still buy them, GW is just laughing all the way to the bank. It's free money.

 
   
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 Elbows wrote:
But look at it this way.

GW has finite warehouse/storage and production space. Going forward their goal will be to replace/kill off older kits. The molds have long payed for themselves. The mold argument is no longer really relevant for 95% of the stuff GW produces. Back when they were a smaller company run by geeks, etc. it was a consideration, particularly in the early days of plastics. Now, any figure they produce will easily make back their mold cost.

So the old and less interesting kits are just icing on the cake really. If they sell them, good. If not...eh, kill the kit off in a few years and replace it. Couple this with GW going from strength to strength and they barely need to worry about it. A new player who dives into the game doesn't have a bit of concern or knowledge over how old a kit is. To them, it's brand new and awesome. A brand new player doesn't see a difference between a Primaris kit and a box of five Dire Avengers (which used to be cheaper...for double the models). It's non-factor to them. Older players aren't buying them, but mainly because they already own them.

If GW can price hike old kits and people still buy them, GW is just laughing all the way to the bank. It's free money.


Right, that's all well and good for models that are SELLING.

NO ONE is buying:

Drop pods
Furioso Dreads
Start Collecting boxes of Scions
Hydras
Dreadknights

and all the other crap on that list. Why raise prices on stuff no one wants?

It's like raising the cost of the salad options at McDonalds. Not one of these fatties wants a salad.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2019/07/08 18:54:30


 
   
Made in us
Awesome Autarch






Precisely why I said...those kits are due to be replaced by Primaris versions. They've already made back heaps of money on those molds. They don't need to sell them. They'll be killed off in a few years anyway.

Again, new players walk in and see those "old" kits and buy them anyway - and they buy them at new prices because they haven't a clue.

 
   
Made in us
Legendary Dogfighter





Ok, so I'm trying to point out something, business ethos dictates you don't let inventory sit. If they have millions of unused inventory, they can't just be like, "Oh well!"

They need to sell that off, or eat the the losses which make investors upset, twitchy, or drop. That is bad. So you sell that, usually at COST, and make back even while promoting new stuff.

None of that is happening, and GW is sitting on warehouses full of pressed models from 2008 in boxes that may or may not even be legal now.
   
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Iowa

 FezzikDaBullgryn wrote:
 Elbows wrote:
But look at it this way.

GW has finite warehouse/storage and production space. Going forward their goal will be to replace/kill off older kits. The molds have long payed for themselves. The mold argument is no longer really relevant for 95% of the stuff GW produces. Back when they were a smaller company run by geeks, etc. it was a consideration, particularly in the early days of plastics. Now, any figure they produce will easily make back their mold cost.

So the old and less interesting kits are just icing on the cake really. If they sell them, good. If not...eh, kill the kit off in a few years and replace it. Couple this with GW going from strength to strength and they barely need to worry about it. A new player who dives into the game doesn't have a bit of concern or knowledge over how old a kit is. To them, it's brand new and awesome. A brand new player doesn't see a difference between a Primaris kit and a box of five Dire Avengers (which used to be cheaper...for double the models). It's non-factor to them. Older players aren't buying them, but mainly because they already own them.

If GW can price hike old kits and people still buy them, GW is just laughing all the way to the bank. It's free money.


Right, that's all well and good for models that are SELLING.

NO ONE is buying:

Drop pods
Furioso Dreads
Start Collecting boxes of Scions
Hydras
Dreadknights

and all the other crap on that list. Why raise prices on stuff no one wants?

It's like raising the cost of the salad options at McDonalds. Not one of these fatties wants a salad.

Actually, I’m buying Scion boxes. Scions and all the bits and the Tauroxes are quite popular for conversions, so I believe others are buying them, too.

If the truth can destroy it, then it deserves to be destroyed. 
   
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 FezzikDaBullgryn wrote:
Ok, so I'm trying to point out something, business ethos dictates you don't let inventory sit. If they have millions of unused inventory, they can't just be like, "Oh well!"

They need to sell that off, or eat the the losses which make investors upset, twitchy, or drop. That is bad. So you sell that, usually at COST, and make back even while promoting new stuff.

None of that is happening, and GW is sitting on warehouses full of pressed models from 2008 in boxes that may or may not even be legal now.


Are they? Where is your information coming from? Because your buddies aren't buying certain kits? GW and only GW knows what they are, and are not selling. Unless you have some inside information. You're basing everything you're complaining about on what info?

 
   
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 FezzikDaBullgryn wrote:
 Elbows wrote:
But look at it this way.

GW has finite warehouse/storage and production space. Going forward their goal will be to replace/kill off older kits. The molds have long payed for themselves. The mold argument is no longer really relevant for 95% of the stuff GW produces. Back when they were a smaller company run by geeks, etc. it was a consideration, particularly in the early days of plastics. Now, any figure they produce will easily make back their mold cost.

So the old and less interesting kits are just icing on the cake really. If they sell them, good. If not...eh, kill the kit off in a few years and replace it. Couple this with GW going from strength to strength and they barely need to worry about it. A new player who dives into the game doesn't have a bit of concern or knowledge over how old a kit is. To them, it's brand new and awesome. A brand new player doesn't see a difference between a Primaris kit and a box of five Dire Avengers (which used to be cheaper...for double the models). It's non-factor to them. Older players aren't buying them, but mainly because they already own them.

If GW can price hike old kits and people still buy them, GW is just laughing all the way to the bank. It's free money.


Right, that's all well and good for models that are SELLING.

NO ONE is buying:

Drop pods
Furioso Dreads
Start Collecting boxes of Scions
Hydras
Dreadknights

and all the other crap on that list. Why raise prices on stuff no one wants?

It's like raising the cost of the salad options at McDonalds. Not one of these fatties wants a salad.


*puts on tinfoil hat*

notice it s alot of older kits and the leak in price drops happens pretty far in advance and was almost completely accurate. Perhaps GW had a lot of these units takign up shelf space so decided to increase prices on them so people would order them before the price bumps thus clearing warehouse space and now with the increased price the few they have left will be at a higher markup.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2019/07/08 19:44:48


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 G00fySmiley wrote:
 FezzikDaBullgryn wrote:
 Elbows wrote:
But look at it this way.

GW has finite warehouse/storage and production space. Going forward their goal will be to replace/kill off older kits. The molds have long payed for themselves. The mold argument is no longer really relevant for 95% of the stuff GW produces. Back when they were a smaller company run by geeks, etc. it was a consideration, particularly in the early days of plastics. Now, any figure they produce will easily make back their mold cost.

So the old and less interesting kits are just icing on the cake really. If they sell them, good. If not...eh, kill the kit off in a few years and replace it. Couple this with GW going from strength to strength and they barely need to worry about it. A new player who dives into the game doesn't have a bit of concern or knowledge over how old a kit is. To them, it's brand new and awesome. A brand new player doesn't see a difference between a Primaris kit and a box of five Dire Avengers (which used to be cheaper...for double the models). It's non-factor to them. Older players aren't buying them, but mainly because they already own them.

If GW can price hike old kits and people still buy them, GW is just laughing all the way to the bank. It's free money.


Right, that's all well and good for models that are SELLING.

NO ONE is buying:

Drop pods
Furioso Dreads
Start Collecting boxes of Scions
Hydras
Dreadknights

and all the other crap on that list. Why raise prices on stuff no one wants?

It's like raising the cost of the salad options at McDonalds. Not one of these fatties wants a salad.


*puts on tinfoil hat*

notice it s alot of older kits and the leak in price drops happens pretty far in advance and was almost completely accurate. Perhaps GW had a lot of these units takign up shelf space so decided to increase prices on them so people would order them before the price bumps thus clearing warehouse space and now with the increased price the few they have left will be at a higher markup.


That is actually a sound theory, I can't speak to how advanced GW's mind games are with it's consumers.

I know that 4 years of business school went out the window when the US fiscal crash happened. They pumped up the "value" of garbage assets, and sold them like diamonds. But that was stock traders. Trying to pull that level of shenanigans with plastic models on an extremely niche market would be unprecedented.

And very little in the game is unprecedented.
   
 
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