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Made in ch
Warped Arch Heretic of Chaos





 filbert wrote:
 Polonius wrote:
 filbert wrote:
It has literally been 2 years since I last wielded a paintbrush I think.


If you haven’t painted, at all, in two years, I don’t think time management is your problem. It sounds like you either don’t like to paint, or you aren’t able to overcome whatever block sometimes hits us for things we like but never do.

The way to paint is to make it a priority and then do it. There are dozens of tricks and hacks listed here to help, but you may need to really do a self assessment on your actual interest in painting.


No, I freely admit that I don't really enjoying painting - it's more of a means to an end for me. I will tolerate it but it does mean my enthusiasm for it waxes and wanes quite severely. Like Da Boss above me pointed out, I have periods of extreme motivation and disinterest and wildly pendulum between the two states. What I really want to do is to lengthen the periods where I have enthusiasm and motivation for the task at hand and manage my time so that I can benefit the most from it. I feel like if I make regular organised painting sessions a bit more of a habit, I stand a better chance of riding that crest of the enthusiasm wave for a little longer.


When you are done being like me fellow hobbyist, i may have some advice aswell

for me, starting my own blog has helped, i had before armies for years unpainted. So i started a project and a blog too boot and am now what, on my 4th project /army in and have painted regularly.

The key is to use the motivated momentum, but not over use it so that you are getting burnt out.

The next key is, to guarantee easy success. As in, i realised that i will never be like some painters on here in minutae and detail. However, i also realised that i am decent at batch painting , that i prefer simple schemes and i turned that into advantages.

Another tip, that is more for painting itself, youtube channels like duncans painting academy etc. are great, but maybee you don't want go and have such whole techniques. My purple is half the purple of a saint celestine tutorial and works just as fine on a table.

Planned projects are a double edged sword. On one hand, they are easier to measure progress on, otoh you will find in luls of motivation it even less enticing to sit through a session.

Batchpainting and low motivation issues. Yes, on occaision you will have those, i fight them in general by just picking a unit, paint a singular colour on it. Call it done. Often i find myself suddenldy motivated after the first bunch and proceed to just grab the next one and the one after. however if you are not getting motivaton via process, well fret not, you still did make significant progress (depending upon scheme) on a whole unit.

TL : DR
Guarantee success by focusing on easy techniques and concepts.
Use motivational spurts to the maximum without burning out.
Still make a point to do something hobby related , mandatory 10 minutes painting sessions a day, may only slowly remove the pile of grey but they still do it.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/12 07:57:54


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 Daedalus81 wrote:

In the 41st millennium there is only overpriced hamberders.

 
   
Made in ca
Ghastly Grave Guard




Nova Scotia

One thing that I've found a lot more enjoyable these days has been painting for the enjoyment of painting vs simply trying to 'get it done.'

I have found that trying to completely paint a whole army/unit at a time is a lot more tedious and nerve grinding than focusing on a single miniature. When I switched to painting for quality vs quantity, my enjoyment skyrocketed and I had a much stronger desire to paint more frequently.

I know a lot of people have said this already but it's a good idea to clean your space and get it ready so the only thing you need to do is fill a cup of fresh water and start painting. Remember: progress is progress. Every little bit helps.

If you choose to go for the quality over quantity mode, consider one of the skirmish games. Make a warband/gang/whatever and fully paint one mini before moving on to the next. This SHOULD help keep it all fresh instead of painting all the skin on all the models then all the armour on all the models, etc... Batch painting works for some but if you're struggling with time and motivation, seeing the progress on a mini and then having it completed will surely help with that.

Hope this helps, I feel your pain(t). lol
   
Made in gb
[MOD]
Villanous Scum







Lots of really great advise so far in this thread. Personally I found two things that helped me to get painting were to do a little a day as many people have said (at least half an hour) and the other was to have set deadlines by signing up to tournaments that required a painted force but allowing enough time to get it done at my own pace. Managed to get most of my Legion army finished this way and it will be my first fully finished army since my IG in 3rd edition! Only 6 models left and tournament in July.

On parle toujours mal quand on n'a rien à dire. 
   
Made in gb
Executing Exarch






 filbert wrote:
 Polonius wrote:
 filbert wrote:
It has literally been 2 years since I last wielded a paintbrush I think.


If you haven’t painted, at all, in two years, I don’t think time management is your problem. It sounds like you either don’t like to paint, or you aren’t able to overcome whatever block sometimes hits us for things we like but never do.

The way to paint is to make it a priority and then do it. There are dozens of tricks and hacks listed here to help, but you may need to really do a self assessment on your actual interest in painting.


No, I freely admit that I don't really enjoying painting - it's more of a means to an end for me. I will tolerate it but it does mean my enthusiasm for it waxes and wanes quite severely. Like Da Boss above me pointed out, I have periods of extreme motivation and disinterest and wildly pendulum between the two states. What I really want to do is to lengthen the periods where I have enthusiasm and motivation for the task at hand and manage my time so that I can benefit the most from it. I feel like if I make regular organised painting sessions a bit more of a habit, I stand a better chance of riding that crest of the enthusiasm wave for a little longer.


I find having a good audiobook or music helps you end up looking forward to the listen if not the painting!
Recently been listening to clasical music. It's perfect for an hour stint

https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/772746.page#10378083 - My progress/failblog painting blog thingy

Eldar- 4436 pts


AngryAngel80 wrote:
I don't know, when I see awesome rules, I'm like " Baby, your rules looking so fine. Maybe I gotta add you to my first strike battalion eh ? "


 Eonfuzz wrote:


I would much rather everyone have a half ass than no ass.


"A warrior does not seek fame and honour. They come to him as he humbly follows his path"  
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran





Armpit of NY

I’m going to be the one to say it - sometimes, you’re in the wrong hobby. I’ve seen it too often that people like the idea of painting up vast armies and playing games much more than they do actually playing any games or painting. And you become a collector, rather than a gamer. If painting is unenjoyable in general or only comes in brief spurts and goes, you have a problem. You get that cognitive dissonance when trying to force yourself to do something you don’t really want to, and find lots of excuses to not do that thing. If it’s not something you like doing or that brings relaxation into your life, and is instead a source of angst, you need to examine your involvement more closely. Unfortunately, I’ve seem this a lot in this hobby, and related ones like plastic models.
   
Made in us
The Daemon Possessing Fulgrim's Body





Devon, UK

Wrong game maybe, but not wrong hobby.

People are sold the concept of vast armies because that suits the sales based agenda.

Realistically this is an aspiration that most of us won't ever achieve, but that isn't the point.

There are many games with realistic model counts for paint, even if it's just 3 colours daubed on with a potato, or even pre paints, out there.

These days I honestly put almost as much thought into buying into a new game as I would into buying a new pet.

But if one is struggling to recreate the battle for Terra in 75mm, it is probably worth looking at something less taxing.

We find comfort among those who agree with us - growth among those who don't. - Frank Howard Clark

The wise man doubts often, and changes his mind; the fool is obstinate, and doubts not; he knows all things but his own ignorance.

The correct statement of individual rights is that everyone has the right to an opinion, but crucially, that opinion can be roundly ignored and even made fun of, particularly if it is demonstrably nonsense!” Professor Brian Cox

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Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut




NE Ohio, USA

 totalfailure wrote:
I’m going to be the one to say it - sometimes, you’re in the wrong hobby.


Well MY hobby is playing miniature wargames. Painting is just an aspect of it.

My enjoyment of my hobby is as follows;

1) Playing - given the choice/chance I'm almost always up for a game.

2) Building/assembly/converting - unless I'm working on a conversion or crafting something unique like a piece of custom terrain, assembly is just a necessary task for most of the games I play. It's akin to doing laundry. In fact, I've built a great many models in my life while waiting on the washer/dryer to finish....
Now granted, it's a more enjoyable task than say.... cleaning the gutters. But still largely just a task.
*
*
*
*
*
*
3) Painting. Ah, painting.... I think I'm attempting to test that theory about if you have enough unpainted models you're immortal.
I rarely actually enjoy painting (unless it's some conversion or custom terrain piece). So I have no qualms about however long doing little bits of it at a time takes for my own stuff. It'll get done as whim strikes &/or the stars align just right. For example; in 2020 when a pandemic brought everything to a screeching halt.... With quite a bit of spare time suddenly on my hands there really wasn't much reason NOT to paint up 15 goblins/day until the box was empty. 300+ goblins(and a few stray orcs) later.... Let's hope the stars don't align like that again for a good long while.

That said, I do have an approach to painting limited amounts of stuff. It's joked that my models have to "earn their paint". If a unit/model does something noteworthy it's marked, added to a VIP list, & gets painted up in short order. Kinda like marking a unit for greatness in a 40k crusade game. But they get paint instead of xp!
If they're not on the list though. Well, it'll be awhile.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/13 04:32:13


 
   
Made in gb
[SWAP SHOP MOD]
Yvan eht nioj






In my Austin Ambassador Y Reg

 totalfailure wrote:
I’m going to be the one to say it - sometimes, you’re in the wrong hobby. I’ve seen it too often that people like the idea of painting up vast armies and playing games much more than they do actually playing any games or painting. And you become a collector, rather than a gamer. If painting is unenjoyable in general or only comes in brief spurts and goes, you have a problem. You get that cognitive dissonance when trying to force yourself to do something you don’t really want to, and find lots of excuses to not do that thing. If it’s not something you like doing or that brings relaxation into your life, and is instead a source of angst, you need to examine your involvement more closely. Unfortunately, I’ve seem this a lot in this hobby, and related ones like plastic models.


I'm not quite sure this is entirely representative of my feelings towards the hobby and towards wargaming in general. I've been doing it for about 30 or so years now so if I didn't derive some sort of enjoyment and fun from it, then I don't think I would have persevered for that length of time. I enjoy collecting and building armies and game systems and enjoy playing games with those armies and game systems. I don't enjoy painting so much; as noted earlier, I will tolerate it as a means to an end but because it is a facet of the hobby that I don't appreciate as much, it is all too easy for enthusiasm and motivation to wane. The whole purpose of this thread is to find some tips and tricks in motivating and maximising both my time and my enthusiasm to ensure that I stand a good chance of getting stuff done. Even if the speed of that progress is only small, I feel that is better than the past year or so where I have done nothing at all with regards to painting. I wouldn't describe this lack of desire to paint as something that causes me angst, however. I don't think I can point to anything in my life that has ever caused me angst.

That being said, I don't want this thread to devolve into a shouting match about what, exactly, constitutes the hobby. I'm sure for the purposes of this thread, we can agree that there are multiple facets to the hobby and that different people enjoy one, some or all of them and the disliking one part of the hobby doesn't necessarily make you any less of a participant.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/13 09:33:52


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Made in fi
Shas'la with Pulse Carbine






For me personally, the most important thing is to do at least something to the models every day. Even if it’s 15 minutes doing subassembly or mold line removal, it qualifies. Very often this 15 minutes stretches out to several hours of work done

Another thing I swear by is keeping all the grey piles hidden from view. You dont want to see all that stuff until it hits the workbench…

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2021/05/13 09:33:06


 
   
Made in gb
[DCM]
Battlefield Tourist





On an Express Elevator to Hell!!

It's funny I have had the same thing with approaching middle age: How much time do I have left? If it's a new army project, I think that's probably two years to complete, it damn well better be worth my time!

Mad Doc Grotsnik wrote:
Realise A Painting Session Needn’t Be Hours Long.
This is something I’m working on myself. Given I work from home, I’m intending to push myself to do a bit of painting during my lunch breaks. Even if it’s just half an hour, that’s enough to base coat a model or two, or do a bunch of drybrush or wash jobs. Do that a few times a week, with perhaps some extra time after work, and I should start to see surprisingly rapid progress.


This is such a great tip. I have found the same thing too; just try and squeeze in the odd 30 mins or even quarter of an hour to base a few minis, a quick drybrush etc. I think quite often this is the only option if you have a lot of other crap going on with work, life, other halves etc!

PaddyMick wrote:You seem self aware enough to probably realise that this very thread is part of you procrastination. Stop reading the replys now and go paint something.

You can read this when your done:

Spoiler:
there's nothing here, go paint some more


Haha brilliant

Overread wrote:Here's a few things I've found help me at times:
1) Organise. Your hobby space, your collection, your tools. Organise.
This has multiple layers to it, but at its core its about being able to both take stock of what you have and also be able to put your hand on what you want/need quickly and without fuss. Others have spoken about having a neat table space to work with and if possible having your hobby space setup - just like that having your models in storage or containers and packets and such helps too.


Think this is a really good tip too and I have found personally helps me a lot. I really try and keep my hobby space tidy - don't have five or six separate unpainted things on the go at once - and I even try and hide boxes of things/the pile of shame! Otherwise they are sat looking at me and judging me, I get all kinds of consternation about what on earth I want to paint next, and I actually end up doing nothing.

A neat workspace, with just your tools and paints out, helps you work faster and I think definitely any anxiety about masses of unpainted stuff.

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Made in gb
Cog in the Machine





Do 15min a day, that's just time to relax with a cuppa. if you manage only 15min a day that's over 90h in the year. That's a LOT of hobby time with very little actually invested.

Approx armies
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6000pts Black Templars (original army)
3500pts Death Guard (lazy side project)
2000pts Imperial Knights (extension of AdMech)
1500pts Harlequins (fun side project)
 
   
Made in us
Regular Dakkanaut




Denver CO

I'll be the first one to say it...pay someone else to do the painting. Of course I don't know your financial situation so this may be out of reach but it sounds like you enjoy owning the miniatures and playing the games more then the painting process (which is a totally legitimate way to wargame).

By hiring a commission painter you remove this stress from your life. In return you get painted models that you can enjoy and play with. You may also help support someone who really, really loves the painting process...win win all around.

In my game group of three, two of us our painters and the third is a collector/builder. And as much as I wish he would focus and paint his stuff I know that he never will. If he spent 1/2 of what he spends on new models on a commission painter he'd have one of the most badass collections around.
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut





Yep. If painting isn't your thing, get someone else to help. Not everyone enjoys painting, and if that's you, your hobby isn't fun. Instead it becomes a chore, and that's no fun at all.

CHAOS! PANIC! DISORDER!
My job here is done. 
   
Made in gb
Regular Dakkanaut






One key is determining WHY you procrastinate.

One of the most common reasons tends to be fear of your work being judged. Starting a project is exciting, because of limitless potential. But inevitably as you work on it compromises will be made, as well as mistakes.

Suddenly the project is less rewarding than starting something new (because the new thing has all that sweet potential of being perfect).

People who fear being judged sometimes struggle to complete projects because as long as the project is ongoing you can't be judged, because its a work in progress.

Do you procrastinate with other things in your life (especially creative projects)?









   
Made in gb
[SWAP SHOP MOD]
Yvan eht nioj






In my Austin Ambassador Y Reg

 Denny wrote:
One key is determining WHY you procrastinate.

One of the most common reasons tends to be fear of your work being judged. Starting a project is exciting, because of limitless potential. But inevitably as you work on it compromises will be made, as well as mistakes.

Suddenly the project is less rewarding than starting something new (because the new thing has all that sweet potential of being perfect).

People who fear being judged sometimes struggle to complete projects because as long as the project is ongoing you can't be judged, because its a work in progress.

Do you procrastinate with other things in your life (especially creative projects)?



I am that unhappy blend of a perfectionist allied with being a mediocre painter. It means that I am never really satisfied with anything I paint thus making it hard for anything to ever get considered done. More latterly, I have started using speed painting techniques and colour schemes and this has helped solve the issue a little. I also invested in a full set of contrast paints to help with the process. I wouldn't say that I am particularly prone to procrastinating in any other aspects of my life though.

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My Project Logs:
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Completed Armies so far (click to view Army Profile):
 
   
Made in de
Fresh-Faced New User





Might be only small and not the best advice, but I always found a good way to get past a painting blockade to just set up 2 or 3 minis infront of me and getting them done to a standard that looks good if they stand about half a meter away from me.
Its often enough to do some base colors, drybrush, metallics, wash, clean-up and highlights and you get those minis sometimes done in under an hour, slowly progressing towards a more finished force. Keeping the other minis out of sight helps agains constantly checking if they look like the others, using the same paints and steps guarantees that already.
   
Made in us
Master of the Hunt





Philadelphia

I paint and hobby it up around 10-15 hours a week now. I still try to finish 3-5 armies a year and a new terrain table if I can each year.

- I checklist everything out multiple times. From painting steps, to averaging time, to what day I should work on what. They have apps for this or pen and paper works.
- I also have a hard "No TV Shows/No Movies" when working on stuff. Podcasts, Music, audiobooks allows your eyes not to wander
- Coffee/Smoking/Drinking: Whatever gets you relaxed enough to get creative and dive into a project
- Kill the "Perfectionist" part. I'm not good enough to be a perfectionist. Slaughter the ego. I'm middling / okay at painting.
- You dont have to paint in the GW/Citadel style - I paint dirty and gritty and use washes and pigments as a crutch to paint quickly
- If you have a clean workspace, clean airbrush, clean paper towels/cutting matt you will be more likely to sit down and start something
- Uninstall video games if you have a deadline on a commission - when I hit 30 I mostly stopped gaming due to the constant "Uninstall Counterstrike" monthly.

This allowed me to paint 50 or so armies over ten years and work on a dozen or so tables.


This message was edited 5 times. Last update was at 2021/05/14 22:26:01


   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran




Seattle, WA USA

The perfectionism part is a really hard hurdle to jump sometimes. I myself had more of a tendency towards that, and it took a lot of conscious effort to shift it into also accepting that sometimes, done is better than perfect. There's a saying, "Don't let the perfect become the enemy of the good."

Part of what helped me there was thinking about what I was doing this particular model for. Was it a gaming piece? A character or a part of a full unit? Was it for "just fun" or display? Depending on what the end purpose of said model was, it was helpful to be able to shift a bit on what my definition of done was for it. I really don't need a unit of 20 duders all painted up to a Golden Daemon character contest entry, for example.

It also helped to make sure to do some of each of those. One of the things about painting, or really any other art, is that the more of it you do, the better you get, but you also have to occasionally push yourself out of your "comfort zone" to continue improving. Even at that, you will eventually hit somewhat of a plateau in "quality" level; but, you will likely start seeing some improvements on how long it takes you to get to that level. Speed will also come with practice.
   
Made in de
!!Goffik Rocker!!






Nuremberg

I am also fairly middle of the road when it comes to painting. So I've tried to just relax about it. I've definitely found that when I do relax, I often get better results due to being willing to experiment or try stuff out.
I do get some misses, but not as many as I would have thought, and even the misses look better with slightly weird paintjobs than no paintjob at all.
That said I often paint boardgame minis or cheap D&D minis so I'm not hugely invested in the figures. When I was painting my Great Unclean One I felt a much greater amount of pressure to make it as good as possible, and minor issues with the paintjob still bug me a little.

   
Made in us
The Daemon Possessing Fulgrim's Body





Devon, UK

Ok, so things that keep me painting are, in no particular order.

- Nothing sees the table without paint. I don't judge others for not using fully painted, but it's not something I let myself get away with. Historically, this is often really effective after a loss when I feel I have the model that could have changed the outcome in the queue.

- Keep learning. Most projects I start I'll deliberately incorporate a new tool, technique, product or "tricky" colour into the mix so once I'm done I'm hopefully better than when I started with another trick or technique in my quiver.

- Good old, hairy chested, balls out self discipline. Sometimes you just need to get your arse off the sofa instead of watching a delightful VT about baby badgers on The One Show and get on with it. I'm not pretending I don't struggle with motivation sometimes, I think we nearly all do, but regaining motivation and getting things done begins and ends with just one person.

For the OPs circumstances, I'd also suggest kondoing the pile and selling off the inevitable excess. This could fund commission painting of the higher priority stuff, allow for room to breathe or even pay for an extravagance like a feth off big new telly or a holiday. Hell, I don't know what quantities we're talking here, maybe even a new car!

We find comfort among those who agree with us - growth among those who don't. - Frank Howard Clark

The wise man doubts often, and changes his mind; the fool is obstinate, and doubts not; he knows all things but his own ignorance.

The correct statement of individual rights is that everyone has the right to an opinion, but crucially, that opinion can be roundly ignored and even made fun of, particularly if it is demonstrably nonsense!” Professor Brian Cox

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Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut





Another good trick toward getting large armies done faster. Rank and file can be kept simple. There won't be a lot of attention on the twenty to fifty individuals in a big block of troops, so feel free to skimp on the details. All that is needed is clean edges and minimal shading/highlighting. It should be pretty fast to do a unit to that standard.

Indeed, it's quite acceptable to paint a whole army to that standard if painting is a chore for you. Better that than grey legion, right?

And then, if you feel it's worth the effort, you can put extra time into detailing command groups, characters and monsters. These tend to be more rewarding to paint to a high level of detail than painting random trooper #30 anyway.

CHAOS! PANIC! DISORDER!
My job here is done. 
   
Made in us
Infiltrating Broodlord




Lake County, Illinois

Here are some tips I came up with: https://adventuresinminiaturegaming.blogspot.com/2016/06/painting-tips-for-rest-of-us.html
   
Made in us
Feral Wildboy with Simple Club





First slow down on the purchases. Second try to pick one or two game systems to play. It was a mixed blessing when WHFB was shelved. I chose to stick with 40k. The new orks are tempting but I will wait especially since the big box will sell out quickly. Start with one project which is closest to finishing and get after it. If you have terrain in the pile knock that out first. I find terrain is easy to get through. After that just repeat. Don't get on yourself if you don't have anything painted recently life has a way of stopping the hobby. Good luck

 
   
Made in us
Battlefield Tourist




MN

Do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2021/05/18 15:08:57


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Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut





 Easy E wrote:
Do not the perfect be the enemy of the good.


I'd always heard it as "Don't let perfect be the enemy of good enough".

CHAOS! PANIC! DISORDER!
My job here is done. 
   
Made in us
Battlefield Tourist




MN

I think it is attributed to Voltaire, so there are probably a few different translations of it out there.

Do you like Free Wargames?
http://bloodandspectacles.blogspot.com/ 
   
 
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