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Made in us
Fixture of Dakka





Feasting on the souls of unworthy opponents

Hey folks! I play Necrons, currently the worst Codex in 40k. I picked them up specifically for that reason – I’ve always enjoyed playing Underdog armies. I’ve been steamrolling them through opponents for months now, and they’re actually undefeated in both competitive and casual play. They haven’t *won* every game; they’ve had a couple of tied games – but its about a 90/10 split between wins and ties.

Outside of formal tournaments, I generally get them out for one of two reasons. Either my opponent isn’t ready to take on a “Hard” army, playing DE or Orks would be an wasted exercise in noob-stomping, or because they need to be put in their place. This usually happens in one of three ways – either a stranger challenges me to a game because they know who I am, tells me that they are better than me, and how much pain I’m going to suffer at their hands, or Person A told Person B who I was and what it signifies, and Player B doesn’t believe them, demands proof, and tells player A that I’m a lair, or because an innocent tournament player (or group of gamers) is suffering at the hands of a TFG who is abusing them and being obnoxious about it – and they ask me to come to whatever store/wherever place/etc and shut them down. In these kind of cases, I make a HUGE deal about how I love a challenge, so not only am I going to play the worst codex in 40k against their super-powered army, but I’m also going to use an army that does what the army is worst at. That’s right – CLOSE COMBAT NECRONS!

I have two themes of close combat Necrons; Wraith-Wing and Tomb-Spyder Wing.

Today’s guide is going to focus on the less mentally challenged of the two, the Wraith Wing. I had hoped to skip this kind of guide and simply have battle reports from some of the GTs coming up over the next six months, but with a new Codex apparently a certainty and a mere 2-4 months away…waiting would render the advice and tactical analysis of the army useless and no longer applicable. I have *no* illusions about the power of the codex, how underwhelming it is – and I like to tell people that I’ve never met a Necron army that I didn’t laugh off the table. I’m very grateful that my use of them thus far has been so successful, but I harbor no illusions that they will meet their untimely demise sooner or later. When I’m in “shutting down a gakface” mode, my backup plan if they fail to humiliate is to say, “Oh...well if you can beat a bad Necron Army, you’re worth my time” and getting out one of my GT armies. =p

SO! This guide is meant to show you what I play, how I play it, and for you Necron players out there….hopefully to see some last minute resurgence of Necron domination before we go the way of IG. So few people remember how gak the old IG were, only that Mech IG is ridiculous. =D

Part I: Dashofpepper’s 2,000 Point Wraith Wing
HQ: Deceiver
HQ: Necron Lord + Destroyer Body + Phase Shifter + Rez Orb + Warscythe
Troop: 11x Warriors
Troop: 12x Warriors
Fast Attack: 3x Wraiths
Fast Attack: 3x Wraiths
Fast Attack: 3x Wraiths
Heavy Support: Monolith
Heavy Support: Monolith
Heavy Support: Monolith

A few notes to address questions that usually come up.

1. Yes, there are 33 Necrons in that army – many fewer than in most Necron armies. Contrary to popular belief, this does not make them easier to phase out, it makes them harder to phase out. While fewer actual models need to be killed to trigger a phase out, a greater portion of the army needs to be killed. 25% of a huge army is a significant force left on the board that could have done something if not for phasing out. Whereas in my army….phase out will literally mean that every unit is dead anyway. I can lose all my warriors and not phase out. I can lose all my wraiths, my destroyer lord, and either warrior unit and still not phase out. More on survivability later.

2. For the purpose of this guide, presume that when a Monolith Deep-strikes within 1” of an enemy unit, they move out of the way. There has been ample discussion in the YMDC forum on Dakka about what happens when a Monolith deep-strikes onto or near enemy units given that the main rules have changed in how deep-striking happens. There are some who interpret the Monolith’s special rules to mean that it will roll a mishap as normal, and move enemy models out of the way on a result of 1-2, but mishap normally on any other result. Others point out that the rule was written when the only mishap result was to be destroyed, meaning that it is intended to avoid mishaps. I play the latter method. Moreover, I’ve yet to play against an opponent who thought it works the other way, nor have any TOs from either local, regional, or GT events that I’m planning on taking Necrons to told me that it works the other way. That isn’t an assurance that you don’t need to check, because you still do. But in 100% of my experience, I’ve not had it ever come up. Keep in mind that YMDC madness is in no way any reflection of actual, real-life 40k. If you intend to post in this thread to argue about it, go rage in one of the YMDC threads about Monolith deep-striking, because I neither want, nor care about your opinion.

3. Deceiver vs. Nightbringer: I get this question a lot. Simply put, neither C’Tan can truly afford to be stuck in combat against their will while the enemy brings their potency to bear. Either C’Tan would gladly assault a unit of 5 TH/SS terminators. Neither C’Tan would be happy to be stuck in combat the following enemy assault phase when two more units of TH/SS assault terminators pile into them on the assault. I primarily use the Deceiver because of the Misdirect ability. He takes his sweet time getting across the board, but as soon as he hits his first combat, he’s averaging 19” of movement per turn after that.

4. I like analogies, so I’m going to use one here and say that a Necron army is like a fortress. Each component of the army is a piece of the castle. The Deceiver is a moat full of poisonous fish that attackers are afraid to get past. The Monoliths are the fortress walls and cannons. The Wraiths and Destroyer Lord are roped Ballistae. The Necron Warriors....well, they're the castle compost heap. Smelly, offensive, useless, and ultimately a mandatory horror that can't be avoided.


Part II: Deceiver Tactics
1. The Deceiver is my beatstick. At T8, he’s a pain to wound, and while he has an innate dislike of force weapons, most force weapons are also not strong enough to wound him. Grey Knights are a good example. Nemesis Force Weapons can instant-kill him because he doesn’t have Eternal Warrior – another remnant of ancient rules when Instant Death worked differently, and T8 was enough to make sure that it never occurred. However, all those tasty Nemesis Force Weapons (with a few exceptions) are STR4, which can’t hurt T8 – which means that all those Grey Knights can either cast Hammerhand for +1 STR to try wounding on 6s, or they can activate their force weapons. Obviously, there are exceptions. An attached IC casting hammerhand on a unit which activates its own force weapons is potential trouble. ICs who are strong enough to wound the Deceiver and have force weapons are trouble – unless they are 3 wounds or less and strike at I4 or below.

2. Deceive: During the shooting phase, he can try to pin anything. Including fearless units. He can also make them fall back (unless they are fearless, in which case they take fearless wounds – a rather useless ability). What’s more, I learned the other day that he can run *and* Deceive – since Deceive isn’t a shooting ability. Nor does he have to assault the unit he deceives, since it isn’t a shooting attack, nor a PSA. I was surprised to find that This was universally accepted. Just goes to show that about the time you think you know what you’re doing, you find out that you don’t – so always keep an open mind!

3. Grand Illusion: I’m not sure that I’ve *ever* seen anyone fall for my bait, but the trick I usually try is to put my Deceiver somewhere exposed to try tempting opponents to deploy units in response to shoot at him, then to redeploy him behind some cover somewhere. My opponents tend to just ignore him anyway though, and I feel dumb for having done so. =p

4. Misdirect: The jewel of the Deceiver. This ability is pure awesome. He can consolidate out of any combat before attacks are made. The obvious tactic: Charge, hope to stay locked in combat so you can’t be shot at during the enemy turn, then consolidate 2D6 out of combat during the enemy assault phase, with an automatic 6” move and 6” assault during your own turn. My main uses for this are to hammer a unit down in size so that the wraiths can come in and finish them off, to create physical roadblocks of close combat, or to “force-kite” enemy units toward or away from something I want. Some examples:

-Hammer: C’Tan assaults a unit of 5 terminators, and kills three of them. The other two aren’t worth staying in combat for when he has 5 attacks on the charge probably hitting on 3+ and definitely wounding on 2+. He’ll consolidate out 2d6 and use his 12” move to get to another target to hammer on while the wraiths and Destroyer Lord move in behind to assault and finish the unit off.

-Roadblock: Enemy unit(s) are moving towards objectives in midfield, which are the mandatory 12” away from each other. A monolith is 7” or so across. A monolith (or hopefully two) attempt (and hopefully land) on top of each objective, or slightly behind it so that teleporting warriors will be sitting on it. Between the two monoliths is a 5-6” gap. The Deceiver moves up to one of the monoliths and is now amply prepared to thwart any effort to either go around the monolith or go between them. I actively look for instances where I can use a Deceiver assault (carefully positioned during the consolidate, move and assault phase) to create a physical roadblock that stops enemy units from getting by / doing anything useful / etc. I had a game last weekend where I had two monoliths in midfield, warriors in my backfield, and the enemy (playing DOA Blood Angel Sanguinary Guard) deep-struck his entire army in my backfield to shoot up my warriors and prepare to assault them. I wasn’t expecting it, and my Deceiver had been busily making his way up to midfield. On my turn, both warrior units teleported through the monolith portals onto the enemy side of the field – leaving the entire army without the ability to get to the warriors without going the long way around over 2-3 turns, or trying to make it through the Deceiver in two turns to get to the warriors. Bam: Roadblock assault.

-Force-kiting. Nothing is more annoying than the blob of Guardsmen, terminators, marines, Orks, etc sitting on an objective that you don’t have the firepower to shoot off, or the assault power to wipe out. Thus, the Force Kite! Imagine this: 30 Orks sitting on an objective. If your warriors could rapid fire them, the warriors would get assaulted in return. The full complement of wraiths and the destroyer lord can eat through the unit, but it will take at least two turns, and there’s the rest of the army to deal with. Force-kiting is using the Deceiver’s misdirect power to continually pull enemy units in one direction. In the example I just gave: The Deceiver gets his initial assault. 30 Orks pile in. Only one Ork can actually do any damage. You kill a few orks, he takes a few fearless saves. During his assault turn, you consolidate 2D6 out of combat in the direction that you are going to want the orks to go. Then you assault them from that direction. Consolidate out, assault back in – each time forcing a 6” defender react and potential 6” pile-in in the direction that you want. I’ve pulled everything you can think of off of objectives. With only two troop choices, I’ll contest if I must, but I’d rather make the enemy unable to contest themselves and leave the objective open for potential teleportation, or simply untouched so that I can focus elsewhere.

5. Deceiver tricks: The Deceiver can also phase through terrain as if it didn’t exist, with the single exception that he cannot end his movement in impassable terrain. Two common tricks that I utilize are to put the Deceiver behind BLOS terrain (like a monolith, or preferably terrain in midfield) and to wait for something to get within 12”. A lot of folks who “know” that he phases through terrain don’t remember, or recognize the fact on the table – because they are thinking in terms of their own movement capability, and 6” is 6” right? This also works on the assault. You can ignore the 1” rule when making an assault – meaning that you can situationally phase through an enemy screening unit to hit the one behind it if there’s enough room for him without ending his assault move on top of an enemy model (which is treated as impassable terrain).


Part III: Monoliths

I had originally tagged Monoliths as Part IV, but bumped them up. I should have done them first. Monoliths are the cornerstone of a wraith wing. These three models are the most important in the entire army. I've procrastinated finishing this section for almost a week to put more thought into it, and as it is, I'm *extremely* concerned that I'm still not going to cover all the important points. If you see anything I missed, feel free to add it and I'll consider it for an edit. As a general principle, Monoliths four three general purposes in a Necron Army:

1. Death Dispensation (Particle Whips and Flux Arcs)
2. HAHAHA NOPE! (Mobile BLOS Terrain)
3. I can waddle further than you can turbo-boost (Teleportation)
4. Oh, did you call dibs on that objective? (Contesting objectives)

Death Dispensation:
Particle Whips are STR9 AP3 Ordinance Large blasts firing at BS4 that cause an AP1 hit to the model under the hole; which is their saving grace against vehicles with high armour values. I won't start repeating all the Monolith rules here because you presumably have a codex. Great for taking down Land Raiders and predators if you're in range, the odd dreadnought, and...truth be told, not much else. AP3 works wonders against marine squads, but you won't need help killing them. Large blasts are great against hordes, but they'll usually have cover. Terminators have 2+ armour saves, and while you might land on target and score an AP1 hit, it isn't particularly meaningful, especially if they have cover or invulnerable saves. I primarily use my particle whips as self-defense: To take down things that can hurt my Monoliths - namely, lascannons. Particle Whips can be fired from any of the weapon mounts on the Monolith. A Monolith is about 7.5" tall, and the flux arcs are about 4.5" up and on each corner - so you can literally fire around the corner of buildings, or use lateral movement to line up a shot against enemy armour that would deny them cover that they would otherwise get. A frequent tactic that I use is to check armour facings on a vehicle that I'd like to fire at, then see if my Monolith can move in such a way that it can put one flux arc LOS into side armour - and circumvent cover it would get against its front arc.

Flux Arcs: STR5 AP4; nothing special but they *are* Gauss weapons and glance any armour on a 6! Against AV10, that same 6 is a penetrate. Since my monoliths are primarily used for Items #2 and #3, I'm teleporting as often as not, and only have the flux arcs to use anyway. Since I play close combat Necrons, I'm not afraid of being within 12" of enemy units - preferably as many of them as I can to maximize the potential of the flux arcs. Yes...I *will* tank shock 6". Or charge a monolith towards a cluster of enemy units.

HAHAHA NOPE

Mobile Blocking Line of Sight Terrain. There's some famous (or infamous) bad advice floating around on how to defeat Necrons. "Ignore the Monoliths and go for the phase out." This leads to a lot of weaponry that could be killing monoliths being fired at Necrons instead. This is a *good* thing. My army has 32 Necron models in it, with a phase out number of 8. Kill 23 single-wound models and one multi-wound model that have 3+ or 3++ and I'm done. In truth, you can't fire at what you can't see. Triple monoliths create a vast wall of LOS denial that you can move across the board, or literally "form" anywhere on the board within about two turns. I use them in four ways:

1. The Monolith Wall: This one is obvious - deployed in my deployment zone, moving up the board to get into 24" particle range while my Necrons hide behind them. Against armies with significant ability to kill them...not particularly advisable.

2. Deep-Striking Mobile BLOS: This is my best protection for both Deceiver and my Wraith Wing. Typically speaking, my Deceiver is trying to get across the board as quickly as possible to make something happen. Move/run in turn one, followed by a monolith deep-striking between him and where he's trying to go - ideally such that he can move and run to get behind it and still be out of LOS. There's only one opportunity for a Monolith to move Cruising speed per game...and that's during a deep-strike! I'm not particularly concerned about thunderhammers and worse when they need 6+ to hit. And if anything *dares* to actually assault the Monolith, they're going to be greeted by the friendly Deceiver in my following turn. The other use is for the wraith-wing WBBs. A turn one move or turbo-boost up the field...casualties taken...and before I take WBBs, I deep-strike Monoliths onto the table within 18" to have a second WBB if I need it. If I have to take it, that generally means that the remainder of the wraith-wing is *also* going to have to turbo-boost over to the Monolith to either bring the rez orb to the teleporting Wraiths, or bring the remaining units of wraiths to the teleported rez orb. But presenting a 6" by 6" Monolith with a door facing whichever way you need (like towards your own deployment zone) as a backup plan / safeguard is quite handy. There are risks - you may roll poorly for reserves and not get any Monoliths. You may scatter 12" away from where you need to be. Risk management is always king in 40k, just keep it in mind.

3. The inaccessible Firing Platform: Impassable terrain is GREAT for a wraith-wing. Your combat units can phase right through it, and your Monoliths can land on top of it where they're safe from assault. Nothing beats particle whipping a Battle Wagon that has a Deff-Rolla with Ghazghkull inside. Nothing in the army can actually hurt you. Against certain armies, I'll happily trade being immobilized ( for DT) on top of impassable terrain in exchange for being impervious to damage.

I can Waddle Further Than You Can Turbo-Boost!

Wraiths have a potential charge range of 42". 18" range to the Monolith, 6" through the monolith to the front, 12" move, 6" charge.
Warriors have a potential movement range of 36". 18" range to the Monolith, 6" through the monolith to the front, 6" move, D6 run.

A few weeks ago, I had a game against Sanguinary Guard Blood Angels. Nasty buggers - the whole army had 2+/4+ FNP. I had gone first. My wraiths turbo-boosted up the field on turn one. Turn two, both of my warrior units plodded onto the board and two monoliths deep-struck in center field. On my opponent turn two, he deep-struck his sanguinary guard in my deployment zone - preparing to beat the tar out of my warriors and go for the phase out. On my turn three, both warrior units teleported and ran about 30" away - two turns worth of movement to even get back into range to threaten me...if I stayed still.

Necrons don't have the firepower or assault capability to simply wipe armies off the table like other codices do - but we *do* have the tools to neutralize threats. Teleportation is also half my strategy in winning objective games. Late in the game, I start teleporting scoring units onto objectives.


Oh, did you call dibs on that objective?:

My Wraith Wing only has two troop choices. In objective games - with potentially 5 objectives on the table, two troop choices don't cut it. However...those two troop choices can grab 2-4 objectives (more than two being from spreading out to hold multiple objectives), while a gigantic block of living metal deep-striking onto an objective or moving onto it make a great contesting unit - incredibly hard to budge. I actually use the Deceiver for a similar tactic by lining him up in the middle of a couple of objectives to go pounce on anything foolish enough to get near them. If there's a BLOS piece of terrain on the board, and you're placing objectives...place one a few inches in front of the terrain feature, and the next 12" behind it. With the Deceiver guarding the BLOS terrain, he'll avoid fire, be in assault range of the front objective, and be able to assault anything passing by the first to get to the second. Monoliths can do the same thing - If objectives are exactly 12" apart, a monolith can sit exactly between them and contest both! 6" wide monolith, putting it 3" from each.


Part IV: Wraith Wing and the Destroyer Lord

If Monoliths are the foundation of a Wraith Wing army, the Wraith Wing itself is a series of gigantic ballista with ropes tied to the end of each so that they can be fired, pulled back to the castle, and fired again.

The wraith wing starts as three units of three wraiths, with the destroyer lord attached to one of the three units. A lot of how they move, what distance they keep for coherency, or how they mix depends on what terrain looks like and what you’re fighting against, but I’ll do my best to give a couple general rules along with some pictures later on.

Rule #1: Stick together! The strength of a wraith wing is in its 6” WBB to another unit rule. Don’t assault things that would pull all three models out of 6” range of another wraith unit and the rez orb. Don’t move your wraiths up the field at 2” coherency distance to each other where a flank of one wraith unit could be assaulted to pull the entire unit out of 6” of the lord or another wraith unit. All ten of these models need to stick together to succeed. Just remember this basic premise: If every wraith is within 6” of the Lord with the Rez Orb, all wraiths will always have it. Start from that foundational rule, and you can spread out to avoid templates in directions that the enemy can’t hit you from.

Rule #2: Use BLOS/Impassable terrain! 3++ saves are nice, but they don’t make you invulnerable to everything – volume of fire can still take you down. Since you can phase through terrain, you can do something enemy units cannot. More importantly, that BLOS terrain can protect one of your wraith units (like the one with the Lord) from being shot at while the other two take fire.

Rule #3: Try Merging Wraith Units! This one is extremely important. A Monolith can only teleport a single unit per turn. Three monoliths let three wraith units teleport once per turn, but means that the Energy Matrix isn’t available to Particle Whip anything. I actively look for and solicit the destruction of 1-2 of my wraith units. If I lose two out of three wraiths in a unit…I have two WBB rolls to make, and may have to teleport through a Monolith to try bringing the others back to life too. If I have a unit of wraiths teleporting through a monolith…keep Rule #1 in mind. I either need to move the rest of my wraiths over to the wraiths by the monolith, or the wraiths at the Monolith need to move out to get back to the rest of the wraiths…combat mobility is reduced. When a wraith unit dies completely, it WBBs into a like unit within 6”. One unit of six wraiths (or five according to mathhammer) is far better than two units of three. Those six wraiths only need a single monolith for teleportation and WBB support, leaving a previously tapped Monolith free to use weaponry or to teleport warriors around the field.

I’ll often set up an inverse L shaped wraith formation. The Lord and his wraiths go inside, and the other two wraith units wall off the direction that enemy fire or assaults will come from. I *want* those wraiths to die so that I can get my superwraith unit earlier. Destroyers suffer for losing units; instead of being able to fire at two targets with two units, they merge into one and can only fire at one unit. Wraiths have no such downside. All nine of those would be assaulting the same place anyway, so making them a bigger single unit is advantageous.

Destroyer Lord
The Destroyer Lord is T6, with a 3+/4++ and three wounds. His positioning is extremely important within the wraith wing, especially in assaults. The ideal assault is one where the Necron Lord is in base contact with only 1-2 models, who do not have power-weapons or rending, while the 9 wraiths are in base contact with everything within 3-4” of the Lord. Enemy models in base contact with a wraith only can’t attack a lord, and using those wraiths to block access to the Lord from power weapons is important. Combat won’t always be optimal like this – there are times when my Lord hangs back behind the wraiths, such that when I assault in, my Lord doesn’t make it into base contact. Protect the Destroyer Lord, he keeps the wraithwing going!

On the tabletop in a game where I’m fielding Necrons, you can expect my wraiths to be zooming around 24” per turn to get into assault range of targets, hiding behind (or in) terrain, and jumping into and out of combat. Assaulting into an enemy, devastating them at I6, losing a couple of models, then teleporting out of combat the next turn to charge back in is great fun. Not to mention that Wraiths are the only jetbikes in 40k that can turbo-boost into terrain! And out of it. Without any dangerous terrain tests! Its not that useful though – cover saves will never beat their inherent 3++.

Returning to the idea of impassable terrain for a minute, and how great it is for Necrons: Monoliths can land on top of impassable terrain. Wraiths and a Destroyer Lord also count as jetbikes, which can land on impassable terrain. If you need to avoid an assault, you can jump out of reach. A monolith on top of impassable terrain with a portal opening into the impassable terrain lets you teleport safely around the board. And the wraiths don't need to take dangerous terrain tests for ending up on top of impassable terrain! =D


Part V: Using the Warriors

So back to the castle analogy - we've got walls, ballistae, moats, cannons...we need a place for the warriors. And I know EXACTLY where they fit in!! Necron Warriors are the corner pile of crap where the peasants dump their offal, and the castle lord's evil and deranged mother-in-law claws out a home for herself and screams at the passing peasants that they need to RESPECT HER PROPERTAH RIGHTS TO CASTLE POO!

Worse, they're the only troop option, come in a minimum size of 10, have no upgrades, and mean that 360 points of your army is automatically forced to consist of smelly unwanted mother-in-law domiciles.

There are two schools of thought on Necron Warriors:

School #1: Take lots of them. More Necron Warriors give a higher phase out number, and you have to kill more models to Phase out the necrons. The downsides are that you're tying up more points in *really* bad units, and that you have more models are on the table getting phased out - I don't think that it makes sense to have so many points tied up in units that aren't going to do much on the table.

School #2: Take as few as possible. You have a lower phase out number, but by the time you hit 25%, you have fewer models on the table, and less combat capability to *BE* phased out.

Necron Warriors serve four purposes on the battlefield.

1. Bait: A tasty unit of Necron Warriors sitting haplessly by waiting to be assaulted...mmmmm, tasty. I typically reserve my warriors and walk them on from the table edge - meaning that my opponents are going to need to get past my Deceiver, the wraiths, and my monoliths to get to them. Deep-striking units (DoA, terminators, etc) can make a stab for them, or outflanking Baal predators, Ork kommandos, wolf scouts, etc. The enemy closes in to beat your face in and...zwoop! Your warriors teleport away.

2. Meat Tenderizer: Warriors have STR4 AP5 rapid fire weapons. Not particularly awe inspiring. 10 Warriors rapid firing 20 shots against Marines...13 hits, 6 wounds, two dead marines. Not a whole lot to scare anyone, and given their low weapon skill, lack of invulnerable saves, and the glee in which people like to try to sweeping advance them...not a tactic I prefer to try. Where they *can* be a useful pile of poo is in softening up a target for wraiths to assault. The *only* time I'll risk exposing my warriors into assault range of something is if their assault can't wipe my warriors out, or if I'm going to assault what would be threatening my warriors - thereby taking them out of assault threat. I typically don't even do this because that power matrix is either getting used to teleport wraiths or to particle whip something. Nonetheless, on occasion an opportunity arises for warriors to lay down a massive fusillade of fire without threat of retaliation, and you should keep it in mind.

3. Objective grabber: Two of every three missions are objective based...and half of those have multiple objectives. The key to winning with only two Necron warrior units in an objective mission is twofold. First, 1" bases, 2" coherency means that 10 warriors can theoretically cover 30" of ground. It is not unrealistic for a single warrior squad to snag two objectives, and if the bulk of your army is tying up the enemy, its quite doable. Most common is having Monoliths sitting on top of objectives contesting them, while Warriors teleport wherever they need to in order to hold one - such that at the end of the game, you've got one or two objectives and are contesting the rest.

4. Anti-tank: Gauss weapons glance on a six against anything, and a speeding rhino/razorback/vendetta (especially a smoked one) headed towards either an objective or one of your warrior squads is a common sight. Wasting a Particle whip that might scatter off or get shrugged off by a cover save is a poor use of resources. Wraiths are probably busy elsewhere, and while I'll throw the Deceiver at a land raider...a light transport isn't worth the effort. Many a games have been won by warriors stunning a rhino that was going to attempt delivering a troop choice to a backfield objective.

In general, the primary role of warriors in my wraith wing is to stay out of the way, not die and contribute towards a phase out, and desperately look for an opportunity to be useful on the field. They virtually always start the game in reserve and walk on the board edge unless I need them starting on the table, and I never have and probably never will bring them in from reserves through a Monolith portal.


I’ll talk more about where to deploy them – when to use the Monoliths to hide wraiths, when to move aggressively with them, etc in the last section of this tactica.


Still to come:
Part VI: Typical Deployment Strategies

This message was edited 7 times. Last update was at 2011/09/22 20:55:20


Hulksmash and Dashofpepper put the fear of Xenos into people at They Shall Know Fear
Dashofpepper's Guide to Tournament Preparation, Survival and Success!
 
   
Made in au
Regular Dakkanaut




great work dude. im hoping that this will go well and you will do the tomb-spider article afterwards
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






Getting my broom incase there is shenanigans.

Necrons are very good at killing newbies...everybody else, not so much.


 
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran




Hmm, I'm not so sure of the Deciever's ability to ignore the 1" rule. Enemy units aren't exactly terrain.
   
Made in us
Hurr! Ogryn Bone 'Ead!



CT

Dash I gotta say I love these guides. I dont play any of the Armies you do but reading them is helping me look at the units I play and in evaluating my own playstyle.

Thanks for the write ups.

Cheers,
~Volkan
   
Made in us
Fixture of Dakka





Feasting on the souls of unworthy opponents

The Grog wrote:Hmm, I'm not so sure of the Deciever's ability to ignore the 1" rule. Enemy units aren't exactly terrain.


I think you misunderstand me. ALL assaulting units and models ignore the 1" rule. You can freely pass within 1" of enemy models to assault other units, etc.

What this means for the Deceiver is the ability to potentially pass THROUGH enemy models if your assault will get you into base contact with them while not leaving you phased into impassable terrain (read: enemy unit you passed through). It is situational.


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Blackmoor wrote:Necrons are very good at killing newbies...everybody else, not so much.


I'd give you a list of what noteables my Necrons have beaten up on using which tournament lists, but 10 people would accuse me of bragging, 5 more would say that I only got lucky, another 2 would say that I was flat out lying, and the thread would disappear into nonsense.

Nonetheless, your statement is an overgeneralization and inaccurate.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/04 22:14:53


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Dashofpepper wrote:
Blackmoor wrote:Necrons are very good at killing newbies...everybody else, not so much.


I'd give you a list of what noteables my Necrons have beaten up on using which tournament lists, but 10 people would accuse me of bragging, 5 more would say that I only got lucky, another 2 would say that I was flat out lying, and the thread would disappear into nonsense.

Nonetheless, your statement is an overgeneralization and inaccurate.


Over generalization, of course! Incorrect? Maybe, maybe not.

The necron build you have is tough to kill. You have the lord with a rez-orb and monoliths to re-roll your will-be-back. That means that what ever you take down will not stay down for long.

If you beat 10 players with the latest, greatest lists that is fine. You certainly have the tools to beat some of the good lists.

But (and there is always a but), good players who have experience playing necrons should be able to beat them. The fact that no one sees them, and no one who has started the hobby within the last 5 years has ever played against them before certainly plays to your favor (along with 3rd edition rules that are incompatible with 5th edition).

Of those players that you have beaten I wonder if they can tell me all of the ways to neutralize WBB so you do not even get a roll?


 
   
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Dashofpepper wrote:
The Grog wrote:Hmm, I'm not so sure of the Deciever's ability to ignore the 1" rule. Enemy units aren't exactly terrain.


I think you misunderstand me. ALL assaulting units and models ignore the 1" rule. You can freely pass within 1" of enemy models to assault other units, etc.

What this means for the Deceiver is the ability to potentially pass THROUGH enemy models if your assault will get you into base contact with them while not leaving you phased into impassable terrain (read: enemy unit you passed through). It is situational.

I think his point is that enemy models are not terrain, thus C'tan can not pass through them.

"'players must agree how they are going to select their armies, and if any restrictions apply to the number and type of models they can use."

This is an actual rule in the actual rulebook. Quit whining about how you can imagine someone's army touching you in a bad place and play by the actual rules.


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DarknessEternal wrote:
Dashofpepper wrote:
The Grog wrote:Hmm, I'm not so sure of the Deciever's ability to ignore the 1" rule. Enemy units aren't exactly terrain.


I think you misunderstand me. ALL assaulting units and models ignore the 1" rule. You can freely pass within 1" of enemy models to assault other units, etc.

What this means for the Deceiver is the ability to potentially pass THROUGH enemy models if your assault will get you into base contact with them while not leaving you phased into impassable terrain (read: enemy unit you passed through). It is situational.

I think his point is that enemy models are not terrain, thus C'tan can not pass through them.


Then he needs to re-read the rulebook. Enemy models are treated as impassable terrain.

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But (and there is always a but), good players who have experience playing necrons should be able to beat them. The fact that no one sees them, and no one who has started the hobby within the last 5 years has ever played against them before certainly plays to your favor (along with 3rd edition rules that are incompatible with 5th edition).


I'd like to think I have experience playing necrons, and can beat them, when they are used in the traditional sense. However, Dash is playing them in an entirely unconventional style. It's very doubtful even good players will expect some of the moves he is pulling with this codex. Imagine if someone built a Tau list made for close combat, that with the right amount of juice could beat up even a fairly competitive Blood Angels super-deep-strike army. It would throw me off, everyone I know, and their neighbours too.
These tactics demand respect, and additionally shouldn't be looked at as something you will potentially tailor your best and most up-to-date codex against. Imagine your trusty TAC list going against this style of play in a competitive environment, and get back to me.

   
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Blackmoor wrote:
Of those players that you have beaten I wonder if they can tell me all of the ways to neutralize WBB so you do not even get a roll?


I actually can't think of a single one. Like what? The only one I've ever heard argued were things like JotWW - which says to remove the model from play. Except...WBB explicitly says that instead of removing the model from play, lay it on its side.

Are there others?

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/04 23:14:58


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Double toughness weapons negate WBB meaning as aforesaid Necrons will have a tough time winning in the current missile spam type lists.
   
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InquisitorVaron wrote:Double toughness weapons negate WBB meaning as aforesaid Necrons will have a tough time winning in the current missile spam type lists.


Unless a Rez Orb is present. And it is. 3++ Invulnerable save, 4+ WBB, second 4+ WBB. I'm not aware of any weapon in the game that can stop it.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2011/05/04 23:29:11


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The list you posted seems like it might have trouble with certain Grey knights lists. With only one res orb your lord will see a lot of attacks come his way at the same time as your wraiths. Have you played any GK lists with it? Or DE for that matter?


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Hmmn ouch. Thats a nice list. 180 Orks might rain on your parade though. Ghaz and some MANz and Deff rollas and Kanz. I would admit that list is tough as old leather boots.

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Dashofpepper wrote:
Blackmoor wrote:Necrons are very good at killing newbies...everybody else, not so much.


I'd give you a list of what noteables my Necrons have beaten up on using which tournament lists, but 10 people would accuse me of bragging, 5 more would say that I only got lucky, another 2 would say that I was flat out lying, and the thread would disappear into nonsense.

Nonetheless, your statement is an overgeneralization and inaccurate.


Can I just say Dash, that that is a very good and mature response.

I don't want to sound condescending when I say that, but I really think that is. Kudos.


The tactica's looking really good so far, I'd like to see some more competitive bat-reps of your crons too. I'm also looking forward to your methods with Tomb Spyders... Great work Dash, helping contribute to the community.

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Dashofpepper wrote:
InquisitorVaron wrote:Double toughness weapons negate WBB meaning as aforesaid Necrons will have a tough time winning in the current missile spam type lists.


Unless a Rez Orb is present. And it is. 3++ Invulnerable save, 4+ WBB, second 4+ WBB. I'm not aware of any weapon in the game that can stop it.

Look no further than your own army list then: Drain Life, pg 27 Codex: Necrons.

"'players must agree how they are going to select their armies, and if any restrictions apply to the number and type of models they can use."

This is an actual rule in the actual rulebook. Quit whining about how you can imagine someone's army touching you in a bad place and play by the actual rules.


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I am actually very curious on how your deployment works with the wraiths and warriors. Mainly how close everything is to each other (for res orb) and what happens during assaults.

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@Darkness Eternal: Drain Life prevents regeneration due to wargear. WBB is not wargear. Nor does the Rez Orb grant WBB, it simply stops it from being taken away.

@InquisitorVaron: 180 Orks. It statistically takes 72 attacks from an Ork boy who's being charged from a wraith take put one wraith down and keep it down. I play Orks, there are no surprises there. I've played against Ghazghkull and Battlewagon spam fairly often. Most tournament tables have at least one impassable piece of terrain, which you can't ram through - I tend to play ring around the rosie with things that can deffrolla me if its possible. I also like to jump my monoliths up on top of impassable terrain where they can't be assaulted; a working and potentially immobilized monolith is better than a dead one. I'll get into this much more later in the tactica. Kans....can't deal with the Deceiver. He blows through them, and wraiths don't do such a bad job either. More on all this later too.

@Dok: I've played my fair share against GK. There are never a lot of attacks coming in against the Lord, and there never *will* be. Generally speaking, when he's in assault, he's only in base with one model, and everyone else is forced to attack the wraiths. More on that later too. I've also played against a variety of Dark Eldar armies, including a fething WWP army that had 45 wyches on foot with haywire grenades and another full unit of bloodbrides - also with haywire grenades. I lost one monolith to a wych assault, and did some significant roadblocking with wraiths and the Deceiver to keep other stuff away from my Monoliths. I blocked off one WWP with wraiths, and a good chunk of his army had to come out from his table edge. The only scary things in a GK army are Daemonhammers that get to the Monoliths, STR5+ force weapons against the Deceiver, and mass psyfleman fire against wraiths in the open getting teamed up against by a crapton of psycannons. Against Dark Eldar, haywire weapons are the only scary thing. Again....more on this later.




Automatically Appended Next Post:
tiekwando wrote:I am actually very curious on how your deployment works with the wraiths and warriors. Mainly how close everything is to each other (for res orb) and what happens during assaults.


More on this later; haven't gotten there yet. =D

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/05 01:18:00


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Well every list has a hard counter, in the case of Dash's wraithwing I'm going to call it as a sad tier 2 army that can never seem to come to it's full potential especially against tier 1 armies.

I've got a friend at the FLGS that shows amazing stoicism by taking crimson fists into tournaments against tier 1 opponents where it really struggles against tier 1 armies like mech BA, mech IG, and space puppies. He's a good painter and and shows even better sportsmanship, but imperial fists with pedro really struggle against a lot of armies, but not Necrons with a C'Tan and monoliths.

Anyhow here is what's usually in the list.

Pedro
Librarian with nullzone
30 sternguard as scoring units,3 squads, 3 rhinos, all with bolters or combi meltas.
20 Tac marines, 2 squads, 2 rhinos
3 Vindicators

I've actually played against that army a lot, it also kind of struggles against CSM especially plague marines, but I don't see a way for Dash to beat it.

Nullzone+ Hellfire rounds=Dead C'tan
Nullzone+ Hellfire rounds=Dead wraiths
Vindicators can hurt a monolith with an excellent chance to pen because living metal doesn't cancel a reroll from a S10 ordinance.
Hiding behind the monolith just means the pie is centered on a monolith and catches a unit also.

That being said Dash doesn't need to worry about imperial fists in a tournament because he will probably never run into it at a tournament. It's a rarely played army, rarely seen at a tournament, and honestly after round 1 or 2 in a tournament it's probably not going to be at the top tables with Dash.

Now the army I'm really curious about going up against a wraith wing like that would be dark eldar. It seems like that would be an interesting match up.

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Dashofpepper wrote:
@InquisitorVaron: 180 Orks. It statistically takes 72 attacks from an Ork boy who's being charged from a wraith take put one wraith down and keep it down. I play Orks, there are no surprises there.



It is ironic then that it takes 27 Slugga Boyz on the charge (on average) to kill your 9 Wraiths.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/05 01:52:25



 
   
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Blackmoor wrote:
Dashofpepper wrote:
@InquisitorVaron: 180 Orks. It statistically takes 72 attacks from an Ork boy who's being charged from a wraith take put one wraith down and keep it down. I play Orks, there are no surprises there.



It is ironic then that it takes 27 Slugga Boyz on the charge (on average) to kill your 9 Wraiths.


On the other hand I don't think they will get the charge that often, I mean wraiths do get 12" of moving through anything plus 6" assault.

Also where are those numbers coming from? I calculated it takes 48 attacks from s4 orks to kill a wraith and keep it dead (50% chance to hit, 50% to wound, 33% unsaved, 50% wbb, 50% second wbb). So 12 orks/wraith which means 108 orks. Unless I missed something.

Even if I did wraiths have a higher I so they will take quite a few with them.

*edit actually only .347 per attack, so with 3 attacks each just over 1 per wraith, and the lord kills 1 as well.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/05 02:12:35


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Blackmoor wrote:
Dashofpepper wrote:
@InquisitorVaron: 180 Orks. It statistically takes 72 attacks from an Ork boy who's being charged from a wraith take put one wraith down and keep it down. I play Orks, there are no surprises there.



It is ironic then that it takes 27 Slugga Boyz on the charge (on average) to kill your 9 Wraiths.


Actually, that would be 28. Moreso, it would take 28 slugga boyz attacking, not 28 slugga boyz charging - which is literally a tabletop impossibility.

1. Wraiths go first.

2. Such a situation would require nine wraiths lined up neatly in a horizontal line to be assaulted by Orks. Not only that, but it would need to be multiple Ork units - 11 Orks are going to die before they get to swing.

Blackmoor, do you really think me that tactically incompetent? With superior mobility, the ability to teleport around, and the fact that those nine wraiths come in three units of three - of which the worst case is them assaulting into three of them...which all die and consolidate into a different wraith unit...why are you presenting these kind of scenarios? I value your input on Dakka, have come to you a time or two for Eldar advice for friends of mine, had fun in our game last year at the SiS GT....I'm confused to your contributions to this thread. How many Guardsmen on the assault does it take to kill 9 wraiths? 9 Obliterators getting the charge against them will surely get the job done if there's no monoliths available to teleport them out.

Happy to have you comment, just please shy away from the ridiculous.


Automatically Appended Next Post:
tiekwando wrote:

Also where are those numbers coming from? I calculated it takes 48 attacks from s4 orks to kill a wraith and keep it dead (50% chance to hit, 50% to wound, 33% unsaved, 50% wbb, 50% second wbb). So 12 orks/wraith which means 108 orks. Unless I missed something.



He's talking about killing all the wraiths at once so that the units disappear and don't get a WBB at all.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/05 02:12:37


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tiekwando wrote:
Blackmoor wrote:
Dashofpepper wrote:
@InquisitorVaron: 180 Orks. It statistically takes 72 attacks from an Ork boy who's being charged from a wraith take put one wraith down and keep it down. I play Orks, there are no surprises there.



It is ironic then that it takes 27 Slugga Boyz on the charge (on average) to kill your 9 Wraiths.


On the other hand I don't think they will get the charge that often, I mean wraiths do get 12" of moving through anything plus 6" assault.

Also where are those numbers coming from? I calculated it takes 48 attacks from s4 orks to kill a wraith and keep it dead (50% chance to hit, 50% to wound, 33% unsaved, 50% wbb, 50% second wbb). So 12 orks/wraith which means 108 orks. Unless I missed something.

Even if I did wraiths have a higher I so they will take quite a few with them.

*edit actually only .347 per attack, so with 3 attacks each just over 1 per wraith, and the lord kills 1 as well.


This is a prime example of what I was talking about when I said that people who do not know how to avoid WBB are at a huge disadvantage to it.

Since my comments have been called into question, let’s take a look at how easy it is to beat Necorns.

First off let’s talk about what ignores WBB:
Sure everyone knows that are either double toughness or weapons that grant no armor saves (AP3+ weapons and power weapons) will neutralize WWB. The one caveat is that is you have a resurrection orb, you get to ignore it and still get a WBB roll. The problem? Res orbs range is only 6” so your army is going to be in one tight packed ball. So not only can assaulting units pull them away from the res orb with the pile in move, but your army moves at 2 different speeds (6” and 12”) so it will be interesting to see you keep your units together.

The lesser known ways to ignore WBB:
The first one is my favorite, the one I call “Hey, where did everybody go?”
If you do not have the same type of unit left alive within 6” at the beginning of the turn you do not get a WBB roll. So if you have a unit that wanders out of 6” of the other units of that type that unit can be killed and will not be back, so be sure to target them. But where I find this nullification of WBB very useful is targeting units. If in one turn you can drop 9 wraiths (some armies will find it harder than others) there is no coming back, and they are gone for good. So when you are shooting at them, do not shoot a few shots at the deceiver, a few shots at a monolith and spread the others around, find one unit type and shoot at it until it is dead!

So what you are saying Mr. tiekwando (if I read you right) is that Orks can't kills 9 wraiths in one turn? Are you saying that orks can't get the charge? First off, they can assault from vehicles after a waagh, so your fast wraiths are not all that safe at range, also Orks are cheap. All you have to do is bubble wrap them with a unit of grotz or another ork squad and then you just counter attack. You can also shot them down with shoots and Lootas, and you can even use Dash's tactic of tank shocking them so that they are in a nice ball, and then unload burna death on them. Heck I bet you can tank shock so you can split the units up so they are over 6" apart so you do not need to kill all 9 but break them into bite sized pieces. Really, orks can kill 9 wraiths in one turn with out working up to much of a sweat.

Sweeping advance
This more than anything lead to the death of Necrons in 5th edition. Necrons have a profile of MEQs, but they can’t beat their way out of a wet paper bag in assault. The demise of Necons came because whenever you get them into assault they will break, and they will run, and you will destroy them in sweeping advance. (Note:I was talking about warriors/troops here)

New codex syndrome: Necrons are getting even worse with the new codexes that have been coming out (If that is possible).
IG: A few templates and massed shooting will ruin your day.
Space Wolves: Thunder Wolf Calvary and Long Fangs are going to Phase you out pretty fast.
Dark Eldar: will drop the deceiver without working up a sweat with poison weapons. Toughness 8? Who cares, they have the same chance to wound it as toughness 3, and you only have a 4+ save. Not to mention haywire grenades on monoliths.
And Grey Knights? Strength 10 force weapons (Demonhammers) with easily kill both of the hard to kill necron units, and gun down the wraiths.

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 2011/05/05 02:43:14



 
   
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I fancy myself a pretty good Necron player, and I would hate to go up against blackmoor with them!

That said, I'd only like to point out that the humble tactica that I wrote illustrates why I think I'd stand a chance.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2011/05/05 02:43:36


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Interesting read so far, Dash. I like where you're going with this, and it's a shame that all this will go down the drain when the next codex is released. However, I'm sure there will be lots of other fun things you can do better than anyone else in the new one too, so I guess I shouldn't worry.

My main question is...what next? Who qualifies as the worst once necrons get re-released? Tau? Chaos?

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TAU by far. While CSM are a shadow of their former glory they are still a competitive army.

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Dashofpepper wrote:
HQ: Deceiver
HQ: Necron Lord + Destroyer Body + Phase Shifter + Rez Orb + Warscythe
Troop: 11x Warriors
Troop: 12x Warriors
Fast Attack: 3x Wraiths
Fast Attack: 3x Wraiths
Fast Attack: 3x Wraiths
Heavy Support: Monolith
Heavy Support: Monolith
Heavy Support: Monolith

1. Yes, there are 33 Necrons in that army – many fewer than in most Necron armies. Contrary to popular belief, this does not make them easier to phase out, it makes them harder to phase out. While fewer actual models need to be killed to trigger a phase out, a greater portion of the army needs to be killed. 25% of a huge army is a significant force left on the board that could have done something if not for phasing out. Whereas in my army….phase out will literally mean that every unit is dead anyway. I can lose all my warriors and not phase out. I can lose all my wraiths, my destroyer lord, and either warrior unit and still not phase out. More on survivability later.


I am lost here. It seems you are saying a greater portion of your army needs to be killed to phase you out compared to other armies? Is 75% not 75% in any Necron list?

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Monster Rain wrote:I fancy myself a pretty good Necron player, and I would hate to go up against blackmoor with them!

That said, I'd only like to point out that the humble tactica that I wrote illustrates why I think I'd stand a chance.


Don't get me wrong, Necrons can win. Monoliths are a PITA and those particle whips are nasty. There was a guy a couple of years ago who played in the UKGT and came in 5th place with Necrons and my hat goes off to him. Coming in 5th place with Necrons is much more impressive than winning the event with IG.

But what I said first still stands, Necorns will do much better against someone who does not know how to ignore WWB, than against someone who does. Everyone on here was saying how good they are, but I have to be the one to rain on everyone's parade and tell them that a good general who knows what he is doing will pick the army apart. There is a reason why no one plays them anymore, and that is it.

There codex is just too old and does not match up well to the new codexes. Heck, all they would need is to have the warriors stubborn and they would be 10x better but they don't, so they aren't. :(

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2011/05/05 02:56:43



 
   
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Blackmoor wrote:Sweeping advance
This more than anything lead to the death of Necrons in 5th edition. Necrons have a profile of MEQs, but they can’t beat their way out of a wet paper bag in assault. The demise of Necons came because whenever you get them into assault they will break, and they will run, and you will destroy them in sweeping advance. (Note:I was talking about warriors/troops here)

Those are STR6 Marines (the wraiths). With invulnerable saves instead of armour saves. I'll address the warriors later - its part of my tactica. Three wraiths at I6. I haven't gotten to this part of my tactica yet, so we're sort of getting ahead of ourself. You really can't sweeping advance wraiths. They're a unit of 3 and I6. They either won combat or are all dead - and joining another unit. Probably one not in close combat. If all nine wraiths are committed, its because they're expected to win.

Assault the warriors. You can't assault warriors that you can't get to. For a variety of reasons. Again....more on that later.



Blackmoor wrote:
New codex syndrome: Necrons are getting even worse with the new codexes that have been coming out (If that is possible).
IG: A few templates and massed shooting will ruin your day.
Space Wolves: Thunder Wolf Calvary and Long Fangs are going to Phase you out pretty fast.
Dark Eldar: will drop the deceiver without working up a sweat with poison weapons. Toughness 8? Who cares, they have the same chance to wound it as toughness 3, and you only have a 4+ save. Not to mention haywire grenades on monoliths.
And Grey Knights? Strength 10 force weapons (Demonhammers) with easily kill both of the hard to kill necron units, and gun down the wraiths.


Yes - those all work against Necron players without any particular tabletop skill. *THIS* Tactica is meant to redress the bad mistakes that some Necron players make. Prime example: Dark Eldar. Oooh...scary. Haywire Grenade the monoliths! Splinter cannon down the Deceiver! Well...those haywire grenades need to survive to *get* to the monolith, The Deceiver has to be in LOS to get shot at with splinter cannons. Interestingly....the Deceiver (and wraiths for that matter) are pretty good at keeping those haywire grenades away, and those monoliths are pretty good at blocking LOS so that the splinter cannons have nothing to fire at. And...even better! Both the wraiths and the Deceiver can simply...phase through terrain (like their own models) so a little ability to judge ranges on the table goes a long way.

Everything *has* an answer. Not everything has an *optimal* answer, nor an overpowered answer, nor the latest cheese - which is why I play Necrons! I enjoy the challenge.


Blackmoor, wait to be dismissive until the tactica is done.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2011/05/05 03:04:09


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