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Captain Brown builds the Flower Class Corvette HMCS CHILLIWACK (What did he say?!)  [RSS] Share on facebook Share on Twitter Submit to Reddit
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Made in be
Confident Halberdier





Antwerp

All those fiddley bits... I'd go mad. Great stuff. Any ideas for Captain Brown's personal cabin?

'The whole art of war consists in getting at what is on the other side of the hill.' -- The Duke of Wellington

My hobby log: https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/770007.page 
   
Made in pl
Crazy Marauder Horseman




Poland

I'm amazed by your effort and attencion to details you put in this project
   
Made in ca
Longtime Dakkanaut




Surrey, BC - Canada

Flapjack wrote:All those fiddley bits... I'd go mad. Great stuff. Any ideas for Captain Brown's personal cabin?


Frodeck wrote:I'm amazed by your effort and attencion to details you put in this project


Thank you Flapjack and Frodeck.

For a base I pulled out the two bases for the Oerlikons (which RCN Corvettes did not get until later in the war), I added some thicker styrene rod from the mixed bag and cut out discs of smaller tubes to fill the top. Then I drilled two holes, one on each side for the turning hand cranks.



The arms of the davits I built from 0.020 thickness styrene cut from the plans in John McKay & John Harland's Anatomy of the Ship - The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ, the davits are basically two identical halves (arms) surrounding the blocks. I purchased a mixed bag of round styrene tubes from Evergreen and it has been extremely useful and I cut out discs to represent the wheels for the davits (large ones for the end and smaller ones down the middle. Then a bit of plastic rod at the bottom to allow the davits to swing freely until I decide on which angle to glue them.

The eye bolts at the ends of the arms were made from small discs cut from the styrene rod and cut in half to create the ring.

Then I built the winching gear box out of two small squares of sprue, first was the smaller angled piece, since the sprue parts are usually angled to a narrow side I just matched a segment to my paired arms. I then made a diagonal cut to match the angle of the arms. Then I cut a small cube of larger sprue and squared the edges and drilled a small hole all the way through (this was for the hand cranks), before attaching to my angled piece.

Hand cranks are made from piano wire.

On the minesweeping gear front: Well I went to a bead store and purchased several small metal rings. Then I cut some styrene piping (smallest diameter I could find in a mixed assortment from Evergreen) to fit inside the ring and filed a notch in the middle. Then I repeated the process and glued the notched sides together making a cross. Then some 5-minute epoxy to get the plastic to adhere to the metal.

Then I built my breaks for the minesweeping winch. 0.015 by 0.060 styrene stripes were cut and then glued together at an angle, these were married together with some of the brown plastic piping provided in the kit for railings.



What is not in that picture are the small discs cut from the brown piping to fit at the bend in the break support and one at the short end (the break pipe attaches at the top of the long arm and connects to the pressure bands on the drum). I may add a pair to the bottom of the break support to the bottom of the drum…but we will have to see if I have room when the thread is added.

Meanwhile I built three styrene staffs, with another little pit of brown piping to serve as the pivot upon with the break support sits. In this photo you can also see the steam motor which ran the gears to provide power to the engaged drums (I made it from some tank treads cut down, brown piping, two kit stanchions, some round sprue from the kit and lots of left over styrene – failed parts/shavings).



Next stage with breaks added, the turning handles, etc.



More to follow as next I have to tackle that worry of mine, the minesweeping floats…

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB


DC:70S++G+M++B+I++PW40k-89-+D+++++A+++/aWD088R+T(M)DM+  
   
Made in us
Posts with Authority





Boston-area [Watertown] Massachusetts

I sincerely hope you enter this into a local model show when you're finished!


Falling down is the same as being hit by a planet — "I paint to the 20 foot rule, it saves a lot of time." -- Me
ddogwood wrote:People who feel the need to cheat at Warhammer deserve pity, not anger. I mean, how pathetic does your life have to be to make you feel like you need to cheat at your toy army soldiers game?
 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut






Alright. Now this is just wizardry at this point.

Amazing, man.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Lone Wolf Sentinel Pilot






"We've found a witch m'lud- may we burn (him)?" Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

"He fears his fate too much, or his desserts are small, who will not put it to a single touch; to win- or lose- it all."

Montrose Toast



 
   
Made in ca
Longtime Dakkanaut




Surrey, BC - Canada

Thank you Briancj, youwashock and Meer_Cat,

Little bit of work on the 4-Inch, mainly the elevation wheel and some more detail on the base.



Mock-up of the progress:



Now that the winch is nearing completion I tackled the item that has had been worrying me from the start and that is the minesweeping floats (dolphins). In the end I decided to make them from scratch as buying an aircraft kit to cut off some tanks was not in the cards and my searches for spare fuel tanks also came up empty.

I purchased a bag of wooden furniture plugs (each plug is about two inches long) of the right diameter for the widest portion of the dolphin. An old Ikea plug cut in half would provide the tail. I drilled a hole in each for some piano wire to give the join strength and then secured them together with some 5 minute epoxy.



Next came the Mini-Dremel and I sanded down the wooden plugs to a general dolphin shape.



Then some two part epoxy putty to fill in the gaps (thread marks in the plugs).



I sprayed them with some grey automotive primer, and while I was letting that dry I started some work on the racks they would sit on.

First I built a simple frame out of angle bracket styrene and then some 0.015 by 0.125 styrene for the ends:




Then I sanded the now dry floats one more time to smooth out the raised areas left by epoxy putty. I followed this with some 0.020 styrene to make the tail and stabilizers (securing them with superglue - a little 0.020 by 0.020 stripes added some strength to the vertical fin glued to the end of the float), and then some 0.010 by 0.060 stripes to build the brackets. A quick trim of the flat styrene at each end and I have two minesweeping floats.



The long painting and converting war continues...

CB


DC:70S++G+M++B+I++PW40k-89-+D+++++A+++/aWD088R+T(M)DM+  
   
Made in us
Posts with Authority





Boston-area [Watertown] Massachusetts

Yeah, I can think of a bunch of fuel tank/bomb/whatever kits for 1:35, 1:48 and 1:72 scale aircraft models, but no guarantees they'd be the right size/length/etc without actually buying them. So, I think the scratch-build here was the best choice.

Bravo!

--Brian


Falling down is the same as being hit by a planet — "I paint to the 20 foot rule, it saves a lot of time." -- Me
ddogwood wrote:People who feel the need to cheat at Warhammer deserve pity, not anger. I mean, how pathetic does your life have to be to make you feel like you need to cheat at your toy army soldiers game?
 
   
Made in us
Stealthy Warhound Titan Princeps







Love seeing all the details - I've always found minesweeping interesting. In ocean or space.
   
Made in ca
Longtime Dakkanaut




Surrey, BC - Canada

Briancj wrote:Yeah, I can think of a bunch of fuel tank/bomb/whatever kits for 1:35, 1:48 and 1:72 scale aircraft models, but no guarantees they'd be the right size/length/etc without actually buying them. So, I think the scratch-build here was the best choice.

Bravo!

--Brian


Thank you Briancj.

kestral wrote:Love seeing all the details - I've always found minesweeping interesting. In ocean or space.


Cute reference kestrel.

Next part of the stern fittings was the depth charge rails. Now my original plan was to just scratch-build my own, but after taking a closer look at the drawings from John McKay & John Harland's Anatomy of the Ship - The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ, I have decided to just use the kit parts with some adjustments. First thing was to cut off the last segment of each set of rails and from the removed segment I cut off the curved loading rail. Now one set of rails would have been for regular depth charges and one set would have been for ‘heavy’ charges which carried an extra weight and would sink faster to make the net of depth charges around the submarine. Of course pretty well no drop was a perfect bracket over the submarines as they would maneuver to avoid the charges because they were well aware that the corvette lost 'sight' as soon as they came close [downward looking sonar was developed much later in the war].

On the depth charges themselves I think that I will be cutting off the extra extensions on each depth charge in the kit (they are too wide when the scale is checked), leaving one side on to represent the ‘heavy’ charges.



So I may still have to narrow my rails by cutting out some of the cross braces. I have already started to sand down the parts to make them narrower and more to scale.

Here is the sweep gear as it stands right now (minus the winch as there was not room in the photo…gives you an idea of how crowded it is going to be back there).



I am intending on mounting it on some lamp finials.
Here is what they look like:


Here is what they look like when the ship is mounted on them.


The long painting and converting war continues...

CB


DC:70S++G+M++B+I++PW40k-89-+D+++++A+++/aWD088R+T(M)DM+  
   
Made in us
Posts with Authority





Boston-area [Watertown] Massachusetts

Great choice on the brass finials!

Falling down is the same as being hit by a planet — "I paint to the 20 foot rule, it saves a lot of time." -- Me
ddogwood wrote:People who feel the need to cheat at Warhammer deserve pity, not anger. I mean, how pathetic does your life have to be to make you feel like you need to cheat at your toy army soldiers game?
 
   
Made in ca
Numberless Necron Warrior






That's a fantastic mount, it'll look amazing once the ship is all painted up.

   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut





Captain Brown wrote:

I am intending on mounting it on some lamp finials.
Here is what they look like:


Here is what they look like when the ship is mounted on them.


The long painting and converting war continues...

CB


It looks low by the bow like that. Can you adjust the front support up a millimeter or two?

CHAOS! PANIC! DISORDER!
My job here is done. 
   
Made in ca
Longtime Dakkanaut




Surrey, BC - Canada

Briancj wrote:Great choice on the brass finials!

Thanks Briancj

Thank you for the comments Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll

Vulcan wrote:
Spoiler:
Captain Brown wrote:

I am intending on mounting it on some lamp finials.
Here is what they look like:


Here is what they look like when the ship is mounted on them.


The long painting and converting war continues...

CB


It looks low by the bow like that. Can you adjust the front support up a millimeter or two?

Actually Vulcan it is not. Because these escorts were based on a civilian whaling ship design they had the "duck tail" stern (which was raised) and allowed the smaller hull length to handle the North Atlantic swells (or originally the North Sea). Now the raised stern also meant that any water that was shipped would eventually make it's way midships to the scuppers and was not appreciated by the crew trying to traverse the steel decks. The ducktail stern was so successful that no Corvette was lost due to storms/weather during the war, storms that sank or crippled many Destroyers (built to military standards) escorting the same convoys.


So next up is the bridge (you could see a little of this work in the last photo of the previous post), while I seem to be jumping from section to section…the truth is I am. I want to make sure I don’t get too bogged down in a particular area. Also helps when I start to get frustrated with a particular part.

Bridge for CHILLIWACK in her 1942 configuration was the original mercantile bridge that had been modified with extensions on the wings and an armoured shield covered by splinter mats. So I adjusted the bridge from the drawings provided by Bob Pearson as his were for a British owned RCN Corvette (like ARROWHEAD, TRILLIUM, etc). Next I added a 17 mm high shield made from 0.040 styrene around the front and extended sides (the aft portions just had canvas dodgers over railings). The shield then had it’s wind shield made from very, very small triangles of styrene glued at regular intervals along the top and a 0.010 by 0.080 strip to make the actual wind deflector…making sure to leave a very tiny empty strip below to allow water to drain. The purpose of this wind deflector two twofold, to help break up any sea that reached that far as well as push the wind away or more accurately deflect it…any one who has stood on an open bridge in a storm knows how strong the wind is once it reaches the bridge.





So I was feeling very proud of myself when I looked at the pictures a little more closely…specifically how high the pilot house sits in relation to the shield.



Therefore I needed to raise the shield to make it look more accurate…several paired strips of 0.020 by 0.020 styrene were needed to do this and I ended up with this:


Just ignore the chips and nicks on the front shield, I had a little trouble with my first attempt at adding splinter mats. I made some from modelling clay and some from epoxy putty and was happy with neither, the kit mats are really, really too plain and uniform.


In this picture you can even see some of the bridge sagging which was a major problem for RCN Corvettes. They do add supports, but never enough as more equipment and heavier weapons were added to the bridge.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2019/07/11 18:48:52



DC:70S++G+M++B+I++PW40k-89-+D+++++A+++/aWD088R+T(M)DM+  
   
Made in us
Stealthy Warhound Titan Princeps







The Brass mounting is really elegant. Interesting bit about the Duck Tail - that is the kind of detail my father loved about ships (and understood far better than I). You know, this blog is inspiring me to rebuild the scratch built Glouster fishing schooner model my late father built when I was young. My son and I were thinking about it doing it together. The rigging is trashed after poor storage and some other parts are broken or missing. Since it was built to actually sail in model races there are some compromises with accuracy, but seeing your scratch building makes me think maybe I could do it.
   
Made in us
Near Golden Daemon Caliber





Affton, MO. USA

Great progress, I applaud your work towards accuracy.

The finials are great, as others have mentioned.

LOL, Theo your mind is an amazing place, never change.-camkierhi 9/19/13
I cant believe theo is right.. damn. -comradepanda 9/26/13
None of the strange ideas we had about you involved your sexual orientation..........-Monkeytroll 12/10/13

I'd put you on ignore for that comment, if I could...Alpharius 2/11/14 
   
 
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