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Made in us
Venator




Washington

https://home.privateerpress.com/2022/07/26/warmachine-big-news/

Warmachine and Hordes MKIV ruleset on the way.


 
   
Made in us
Member of a Lodge? I Can't Say





Philadelphia PA

3d printing for a mass market miniatures game?

Bold strategy Cotton

Honestly, I just can't see it. This seems like the continued devolution of the game back into a much smaller niche compared to when it was giving GW a run for their money.
   
Made in gb
Decrepit Dakkanaut




UK

if they still had a huge player base this would shatter it,

but from the looks of it that's no longer the case so any step forward will be seen as positive

but i'd guess unlimited may well fold fairly fast (probably well before all the models are statted)

and new 4th ed will be the only way to play for those still interested

 
   
Made in us
Longtime Dakkanaut




I stopped reading after they presented a Legends equivalent.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Longtime Dakkanaut





It will be interesting to see how the 3d printing goes. I cannot disagree with the points they make about what they can do with a printer vs traditional molds as well as how they can set up print farms in other parts of the world to produce locally. Those are some amazing strengths for printers.

Also beta rules available tomorrow for download.

   
Made in us
Fixture of Dakka





Definitely a huge change, though almost all of it is things we've all kind of said the game needed for years now. They're taking a huge step back towards a more approachable, quicker more skirmish scaled game. Unit sizes are notably smaller, as is the size of the game in general. It's just painful as its pretty clear that there's not a lot of plans to really support existing models, so we're more or less talking a whole new game here.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2022/07/26 19:08:05


 
   
Made in us
Terrifying Doombull




Mk3 was a 'living game?' Honestly did not know that.

New editions are hard? Er, what? The entire games industry (TT and RPGs) is structured around new editions.

Setting fire to the minis line (no matter how they dress it up) is going to go over badly. That its going to take years and years to get the Legends mode going should be a convincing argument that it isn't going to work.

Factions vs Armies vs Cadres.
yeah... Fun with pointless army restrictions further invalidating stuff. Cool.

Our two brands are one brand.
No crap. But... why is one brand the absolute loser, here? Easier to jump in doesn't make this ok.

Blah, blah App.
But at least we aren't charging you this time!
Feth off.

3d printing
Uh-huh. So wait and see what the quality is like, I guess.

SKUs
Ugh. That's dropping the model range down to basically nothing and cookie cutter armies by default, with very few way out of it. Sounds terrible.

Inherently magnetized kits sounds intriguing.

Kind of want to see the Beta Rules, but that's about it. Hopefully it isn't as much of a mess as the mk3 rulebooks were.

Sounds like a disaster, all told.

Efficiency is the highest virtue. 
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran




Seattle, WA USA

 ScarletRose wrote:
3d printing for a mass market miniatures game?

Bold strategy Cotton

Honestly, I just can't see it. This seems like the continued devolution of the game back into a much smaller niche compared to when it was giving GW a run for their money.
I actually think the 3d printing production is a good call. I've been thinking it was going to supplant resin casting for small and medium outfits pretty quickly, as the cost ratio is pretty much in line these days, and 3d printer tech and costs are going down and improving in quality, unlike resin casting which, if anything, is going up in costs. The idea that they can have internationally distributed production centers much more easily is also a good factor.

It remains to be seen if they can keep up with sales, but at the same time, it's relatively easy to scale 3d printing production in comparison to resin or metal casting production.
   
Made in es
Inspiring SDF-1 Bridge Officer






 ScarletRose wrote:
3d printing for a mass market miniatures game?

Bold strategy Cotton

Honestly, I just can't see it. This seems like the continued devolution of the game back into a much smaller niche compared to when it was giving GW a run for their money.


It feels like the way forward, to be honest, particularly with the mounting supply chain issues and shipping costs. The ability to produce locally and reduce shipping costs (and taxes) and the complexity of your supply chain are reasons more than enough to go for it.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Longtime Dakkanaut





 LunarSol wrote:
Definitely a huge change, though almost all of it is things we've all kind of said the game needed for years now. They're taking a huge step back towards a more approachable, quicker more skirmish scaled game. Unit sizes are notably smaller, as is the size of the game in general. It's just painful as its pretty clear that there's not a lot of plans to really support existing models, so we're more or less talking a whole new game here.


Yet at the same time the Legacy system is the only real way to handle the bloat of the game. People complain about these but It's worked for CCGs for longer then I can even remember and is really the only good way going forward.

They're not the only ones having this issue as CB had to do something similar with N4 Infinity as distributors only want to carry new stuff and so they have to constantly be cycling armies or remaking them (Morrats are getting yet another redesign) to keep them in stores.

People will leave or have no interested coming back but if they don't do this the MK4 will be doa as it just won't be able to grow.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2022/07/26 19:11:54


 
   
Made in us
Fixture of Dakka





MK3 didn't exist. It was marketed as "All New War" and stated as the more or less ultimate edition of the game designed so that it would just evolve the rules rather than there ever be a new edition. Obviously that didn't pan out.... almost immediately, but yeah, MK3 was just a fan name. To PP, the edition was just the "living rules" for Warmachine going forward when it launched.
   
Made in us
Member of a Lodge? I Can't Say





Philadelphia PA

 Valander wrote:
 ScarletRose wrote:
3d printing for a mass market miniatures game?

Bold strategy Cotton

Honestly, I just can't see it. This seems like the continued devolution of the game back into a much smaller niche compared to when it was giving GW a run for their money.
I actually think the 3d printing production is a good call. I've been thinking it was going to supplant resin casting for small and medium outfits pretty quickly, as the cost ratio is pretty much in line these days, and 3d printer tech and costs are going down and improving in quality, unlike resin casting which, if anything, is going up in costs. The idea that they can have internationally distributed production centers much more easily is also a good factor.

It remains to be seen if they can keep up with sales, but at the same time, it's relatively easy to scale 3d printing production in comparison to resin or metal casting production.


I'll just put it this way - I know I'm only one gamer, but I have never in my life said "wow, I'm really looking forward to working on this 3d print"

Where on the other hand I have said similar for hard plastic minis, and some resin casts too. As someone who isn't into printing as a hobby my experience is 3d prints combine the downsides of resin casts (brittle) with print lines and defects that are hard to fix (because brittle, and toxic dust).

3d printing solidly has a place, but IMO it's for rapid prototyping and creating a diverse array of supplementary bits (shoulder pads and whatnot) at a low cost.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Longtime Dakkanaut





 Albertorius wrote:
 ScarletRose wrote:
3d printing for a mass market miniatures game?

Bold strategy Cotton

Honestly, I just can't see it. This seems like the continued devolution of the game back into a much smaller niche compared to when it was giving GW a run for their money.


It feels like the way forward, to be honest, particularly with the mounting supply chain issues and shipping costs. The ability to produce locally and reduce shipping costs (and taxes) and the complexity of your supply chain are reasons more than enough to go for it.


And I'm sure lots of other companies will be watching this as right now I'm hearing a lot of "we cannot afford to keep making meta/resin" posts in smaller lines and they're looking at siocast but I'm sure if PP is successful here more might look at 3d printing.

I've been buying Model Train stuff for Fallout (O scale is very close) and a lot of the small 1-2 person shops do almost everything that use to be cast resin/metal with printers now.
   
Made in us
Sadistic Inquisitorial Excruciator




USA

I’ll be interested to see how the 3D printing goes. They do make valid points about the benefits of it. Honestly I have bought some 3D printed stuff off Etsy that was pretty impressive….way better than the crappy PVC Privateer Used…..and I like they are building the Warjacks to be magnetized and including compatible magnets in the kit.

That said the MSRPs they are listing for 3D printed miniatures seem pretty outrageous. 200 bucks for half a 3D printed army? I’d call that a tough sell.

 
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Longtime Dakkanaut





 ScarletRose wrote:
3d printing for a mass market miniatures game?


I'll just put it this way - I know I'm only one gamer, but I have never in my life said "wow, I'm really looking forward to working on this 3d print"

Where on the other hand I have said similar for hard plastic minis, and some resin casts too. As someone who isn't into printing as a hobby my experience is 3d prints combine the downsides of resin casts (brittle) with print lines and defects that are hard to fix (because brittle, and toxic dust).

3d printing solidly has a place, but IMO it's for rapid prototyping and creating a diverse array of supplementary bits (shoulder pads and whatnot) at a low cost.


Those must have been some very old, low quality resin printers. my first one that I got, that may not have even been 1080p for the screen, had that problem. My new 8k printer ($600USD) lines are truly microscopic and the resin is not that hard to work with. If you don't like resin in general (cast or other wise) ya, it's very similar but there are some very durable, high detail resins (sometimes called ABS Like) that make good gaming figures. Depends on what PP is using to be honest -- just like cast resin.
   
Made in gb
Pious Warrior Priest




UK

3d printed production is brilliant, first major company to go down this route.

I wonder if they'll sell STLs as well?
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran




Seattle, WA USA

 ScarletRose wrote:


I'll just put it this way - I know I'm only one gamer, but I have never in my life said "wow, I'm really looking forward to working on this 3d print"

Where on the other hand I have said similar for hard plastic minis, and some resin casts too. As someone who isn't into printing as a hobby my experience is 3d prints combine the downsides of resin casts (brittle) with print lines and defects that are hard to fix (because brittle, and toxic dust).

3d printing solidly has a place, but IMO it's for rapid prototyping and creating a diverse array of supplementary bits (shoulder pads and whatnot) at a low cost.
It depends very much on what resin was used for the print, and what printer. The stuff I print out is equally hard as any resin cast model I've ever bought, if not stronger than some, and my Sonic Mini 4K does extremely good details and layer lines really only visible under some strong magnification. And that's a 350 USD consumer, last gen machine. Did you know that the majority of resin, and even many metal, casts are made from 3d printed masters these days?

Now I'm not saying that there aren't disadvantages to it, for sure. I'll fully agree that one of the better materials is injection molded HIPS, but at the same time that technology is very expensive to get up and running. IMO, compared to the handful of Siocast models I've worked on, I'd rather work on a resin-cast or 3d printed model every time, as I find the Siocast a pain to get clean of mold lines.
   
Made in us
Ollanius Pius - Savior of the Emperor






Gathering the Informations.


• In MKIV, the force you put on the tabletop is an Army, which is a subset of a Faction.

• Models from Armies within the same Faction are not compatible.

• Cadres provide small subsets of a Faction that are compatible with all Armies within a Faction.

A fundamental change in MKIV is that you will no longer play a Faction; you will play an army that is part of a Faction. The Storm Legion, for instance, is an army under the Faction banner of Cygnar. While it will possess many different model options from which a wide variety of army compositions can be built, armies will effectively be finite and closed. Each new army will have its own selection of warcasters and warjacks, units and solos, all of which can only be used in that army. And while we’ll always reserve the right to add new content to an army, armies will not be continually expanded in perpetuity. Our current schema for an army includes three warcasters, two warjacks, five to six units, and a handful of solos.

Cadres are smaller subgroups of a Faction, usually specialists, that can work with multiple armies within a Faction. So as a completely hypothetical example, let’s say we create a Gravediggers army for Cygnar in the future. Then, any models in the Stormsmith Cadre would be able to be used in a Storm Legion or Gravediggers army. Similarly, larger and more expensive models like Colossals and Battle Engines will most commonly be available to multiple armies within a Faction, providing more bang for the buck for those interested in exploring different armies within a Faction.

By restructuring model offerings in this fashion, we hope to be able to offer a wide selection of different armies without creating the expectation that armies will be continually expanded or repeating the problems that come with such ongoing expansion. A more contained approach to the armies, we hope, will also make them easier to learn and understand, even as the overall game catalog grows over time.


I honestly don't hate this.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Longtime Dakkanaut





 Sabotage! wrote:


That said the MSRPs they are listing for 3D printed miniatures seem pretty outrageous. 200 bucks for half a 3D printed army? I’d call that a tough sell.


Why? 3d printers still require a good amount of work to clean up and maintain. My larger printer, about iPad sized screen, can easily take me 60-90 minutes to clean up and do the final cure of the minis for maybe 20-30 things. If they're using a really good resin that plate is going to be $30-$40 right there for just humans. Then the screen wear time has to be added.

They aren't something you spend 10min with and everything magically exists ready to use.

You also have to add in the distributor and store tax of 60% or so (so that 200 bundle is being sold into distribution for $80).


Automatically Appended Next Post:
scarletsquig wrote:
3d printed production is brilliant, first major company to go down this route.

I wonder if they'll sell STLs as well?


They've said no to that many times just in this past week on Facebook.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 2022/07/26 19:30:56


 
   
Made in us
Terrifying Doombull




 Kanluwen wrote:

• In MKIV, the force you put on the tabletop is an Army, which is a subset of a Faction.

• Models from Armies within the same Faction are not compatible.

• Cadres provide small subsets of a Faction that are compatible with all Armies within a Faction.

A fundamental change in MKIV is that you will no longer play a Faction; you will play an army that is part of a Faction. The Storm Legion, for instance, is an army under the Faction banner of Cygnar. While it will possess many different model options from which a wide variety of army compositions can be built, armies will effectively be finite and closed. Each new army will have its own selection of warcasters and warjacks, units and solos, all of which can only be used in that army. And while we’ll always reserve the right to add new content to an army, armies will not be continually expanded in perpetuity. Our current schema for an army includes three warcasters, two warjacks, five to six units, and a handful of solos.

Cadres are smaller subgroups of a Faction, usually specialists, that can work with multiple armies within a Faction. So as a completely hypothetical example, let’s say we create a Gravediggers army for Cygnar in the future. Then, any models in the Stormsmith Cadre would be able to be used in a Storm Legion or Gravediggers army. Similarly, larger and more expensive models like Colossals and Battle Engines will most commonly be available to multiple armies within a Faction, providing more bang for the buck for those interested in exploring different armies within a Faction.

By restructuring model offerings in this fashion, we hope to be able to offer a wide selection of different armies without creating the expectation that armies will be continually expanded or repeating the problems that come with such ongoing expansion. A more contained approach to the armies, we hope, will also make them easier to learn and understand, even as the overall game catalog grows over time.


I honestly don't hate this.
I do. It basically doubles down on excluding 'your dudes, your way.'

Not on our PP's watch, you'll play their way (and with the new models), or not at all.

The idea that you can't have storm knights as a mobile fighting reserve for a gunline of trenchers is patently absurd according to their own fluff and way more boring.

This message was edited 4 times. Last update was at 2022/07/26 19:36:50


Efficiency is the highest virtue. 
   
Made in fr
5th God of Chaos (O'rly?)





Interesting. I'm kind of target they are targeting. Used to play, have interested, no old models so them going to pp legends not issue and culling sku's helps it not being so overwhelming.

Depending rules/prices/local gaming circuit could be interesting.

Edit: prices looks bit worrying but we'll see.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2022/07/26 19:45:54


2022 painted/bought: 587/638 
   
Made in gb
Regular Dakkanaut







Read through the whole article, well written and seems as though they have really taken on board all the criticism and suggestions made by the community over the past few years. Making all the right moves to bring in new blood to the game, which it is sorely in need of. WM is still IMO one of the cleanest rulesets around with a great deal of mechanical/strategic depth, which really makes it ideal for the hyper competitive minded wargamer . Certainly better than anything GW is currently producing on that front (come at me GW fanboys.) I actually plan to open my own gaming venue next year, and this will be one of the games I intend on promoting and supporting, so the timing of this will align with that quite nicely.

The only thing I don't really like is the FORCED app use, I understand all the advantages it brings, with the ability to make more regular balance tweaks much in the same way online competitive video games do. But I Just don't like using digital tech in my table top games, it just feels like a less 'pure' experience... table top games are my escape from digital tech/screens, which I think most would agree we have too much of in our life's already. It can often be quite clunky navigating through touch screen menus to find what you need too, instead of just being able to pick up and glance at a card, or hand to your opponent should they need to reference it... then you have the issue of low battery on your devices... you definitely need a bigger screen tablet with a longer battery life if as opposed to a phone. Hopefully if enough people demand it they will make physical print your own cards an option, like they were previously supporting.

I wonder what this means for their Warcaster NM line, I assume all of that will now be 3d printed too? Glad I held off on buying those if true as I'm quite interested in taking that game for a test drive at some point.
   
Made in us
Member of a Lodge? I Can't Say





Philadelphia PA

 Valander wrote:
 ScarletRose wrote:


I'll just put it this way - I know I'm only one gamer, but I have never in my life said "wow, I'm really looking forward to working on this 3d print"

Where on the other hand I have said similar for hard plastic minis, and some resin casts too. As someone who isn't into printing as a hobby my experience is 3d prints combine the downsides of resin casts (brittle) with print lines and defects that are hard to fix (because brittle, and toxic dust).

3d printing solidly has a place, but IMO it's for rapid prototyping and creating a diverse array of supplementary bits (shoulder pads and whatnot) at a low cost.
It depends very much on what resin was used for the print, and what printer. The stuff I print out is equally hard as any resin cast model I've ever bought, if not stronger than some, and my Sonic Mini 4K does extremely good details and layer lines really only visible under some strong magnification. And that's a 350 USD consumer, last gen machine. Did you know that the majority of resin, and even many metal, casts are made from 3d printed masters these days?


Yes, I did know that, so please don't try to "well ackshually..." me.

I even mentioned prototyping as an application of 3dd printing.

Now I'm not saying that there aren't disadvantages to it, for sure. I'll fully agree that one of the better materials is injection molded HIPS, but at the same time that technology is very expensive to get up and running. IMO, compared to the handful of Siocast models I've worked on, I'd rather work on a resin-cast or 3d printed model every time, as I find the Siocast a pain to get clean of mold lines.


Haven't handled a Siocast mini yet, but I've work on some of Reaper's plastics and they're pretty hit and miss with mold line removal depending on which version of Bones it is and how thoughtful they were with mold line placement. If I had the choice of 3d print or Bones it would really depend on the miniature in question.
   
Made in us
[DCM]
Longtime Dakkanaut





 ScarletRose wrote:
 Valander wrote:
 ScarletRose wrote:


I'll just put it this way - I know I'm only one gamer, but I have never in my life said "wow, I'm really looking forward to working on this 3d print"

Where on the other hand I have said similar for hard plastic minis, and some resin casts too. As someone who isn't into printing as a hobby my experience is 3d prints combine the downsides of resin casts (brittle) with print lines and defects that are hard to fix (because brittle, and toxic dust).

3d printing solidly has a place, but IMO it's for rapid prototyping and creating a diverse array of supplementary bits (shoulder pads and whatnot) at a low cost.
It depends very much on what resin was used for the print, and what printer. The stuff I print out is equally hard as any resin cast model I've ever bought, if not stronger than some, and my Sonic Mini 4K does extremely good details and layer lines really only visible under some strong magnification. And that's a 350 USD consumer, last gen machine. Did you know that the majority of resin, and even many metal, casts are made from 3d printed masters these days?


Yes, I did know that, so please don't try to "well ackshually..." me.

I even mentioned prototyping as an application of 3dd printing.

Now I'm not saying that there aren't disadvantages to it, for sure. I'll fully agree that one of the better materials is injection molded HIPS, but at the same time that technology is very expensive to get up and running. IMO, compared to the handful of Siocast models I've worked on, I'd rather work on a resin-cast or 3d printed model every time, as I find the Siocast a pain to get clean of mold lines.


Haven't handled a Siocast mini yet, but I've work on some of Reaper's plastics and they're pretty hit and miss with mold line removal depending on which version of Bones it is and how thoughtful they were with mold line placement. If I had the choice of 3d print or Bones it would really depend on the miniature in question.


Bones USA is Siocast FYI.
   
Made in us
Fixture of Dakka





 Kanluwen wrote:

• In MKIV, the force you put on the tabletop is an Army, which is a subset of a Faction.

• Models from Armies within the same Faction are not compatible.

• Cadres provide small subsets of a Faction that are compatible with all Armies within a Faction.

A fundamental change in MKIV is that you will no longer play a Faction; you will play an army that is part of a Faction. The Storm Legion, for instance, is an army under the Faction banner of Cygnar. While it will possess many different model options from which a wide variety of army compositions can be built, armies will effectively be finite and closed. Each new army will have its own selection of warcasters and warjacks, units and solos, all of which can only be used in that army. And while we’ll always reserve the right to add new content to an army, armies will not be continually expanded in perpetuity. Our current schema for an army includes three warcasters, two warjacks, five to six units, and a handful of solos.

Cadres are smaller subgroups of a Faction, usually specialists, that can work with multiple armies within a Faction. So as a completely hypothetical example, let’s say we create a Gravediggers army for Cygnar in the future. Then, any models in the Stormsmith Cadre would be able to be used in a Storm Legion or Gravediggers army. Similarly, larger and more expensive models like Colossals and Battle Engines will most commonly be available to multiple armies within a Faction, providing more bang for the buck for those interested in exploring different armies within a Faction.

By restructuring model offerings in this fashion, we hope to be able to offer a wide selection of different armies without creating the expectation that armies will be continually expanded or repeating the problems that come with such ongoing expansion. A more contained approach to the armies, we hope, will also make them easier to learn and understand, even as the overall game catalog grows over time.


I honestly don't hate this.


The most exciting potential this has in in that 4th faction they teased. Dusk: House Kallyss. This seems like its obvious Eldritch which means Retribution, but the logo has a bit of Cryx to it and.... that's still Eldritch. No reason an Army can't belong to more than one faction and if that's the case, the Cadres will significantly change how the armies play depending on the faction they are played in.
   
Made in us
Dakka Veteran




Seattle, WA USA

 ScarletRose wrote:
 Valander wrote:
 ScarletRose wrote:


I'll just put it this way - I know I'm only one gamer, but I have never in my life said "wow, I'm really looking forward to working on this 3d print"

Where on the other hand I have said similar for hard plastic minis, and some resin casts too. As someone who isn't into printing as a hobby my experience is 3d prints combine the downsides of resin casts (brittle) with print lines and defects that are hard to fix (because brittle, and toxic dust).

3d printing solidly has a place, but IMO it's for rapid prototyping and creating a diverse array of supplementary bits (shoulder pads and whatnot) at a low cost.
It depends very much on what resin was used for the print, and what printer. The stuff I print out is equally hard as any resin cast model I've ever bought, if not stronger than some, and my Sonic Mini 4K does extremely good details and layer lines really only visible under some strong magnification. And that's a 350 USD consumer, last gen machine. Did you know that the majority of resin, and even many metal, casts are made from 3d printed masters these days?


Yes, I did know that, so please don't try to "well ackshually..." me.

I even mentioned prototyping as an application of 3dd printing.

Now I'm not saying that there aren't disadvantages to it, for sure. I'll fully agree that one of the better materials is injection molded HIPS, but at the same time that technology is very expensive to get up and running. IMO, compared to the handful of Siocast models I've worked on, I'd rather work on a resin-cast or 3d printed model every time, as I find the Siocast a pain to get clean of mold lines.


Haven't handled a Siocast mini yet, but I've work on some of Reaper's plastics and they're pretty hit and miss with mold line removal depending on which version of Bones it is and how thoughtful they were with mold line placement. If I had the choice of 3d print or Bones it would really depend on the miniature in question.
Well, ackshually, prototyping isn't the same as master copy printing. (Seriously, I am joking, and didn't mean to be That Guy in my earlier reply)

The one thing that I am pretty concerned about is actually how they'll deal with QC if they're distributing their printing farms. You might get some prints from a producer that knows their gak and really did a good job, and then some other producer (maybe across the pond, maybe wherever else they're thinking) doesn't take as much care and you get less quality parts. This happens with cast resins, too, though, but that's not as easily or as often distributed.

I guess my real point is that I've worked with a lot of different materials for models over a long time, from lead (real lead) to 3d print resin and everything that's ever been used in between (I'm old, lol), and have generally found that some of the newer 3d resins are equal or better to the resins used in "traditional" casting. Yes, with that, comes all the disadvantages of resin (more brittle than metal or HIPS), but also with the many of their own advantages (lightweight, fairly easy to sand or carve). If I was given a choice of materials, from worst to best I'd rate them: PVC, Bones 1, Siocast (which is basically Bones USA), White Metal, Polyurethane cast resin, 3d printed resin, HIPS injection molded.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2022/07/26 19:52:13


 
   
Made in fi
Fresh-Faced New User




Armies are the same as Theme Forces in Mk3.
   
Made in us
Humming Great Unclean One of Nurgle






Promising. The app functionality and production methods are the big news here.

Road to Renown! It's like classic Path to Glory, but repaired, remastered, expanded! https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/778170.page

I chose an avatar I feel best represents the quality of my post history.

I try to view Warhammer as more of a toolbox with examples than fully complete games. 
   
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Decrepit Dakkanaut





Tampa,FL USA

 NinthMusketeer wrote:
Promising. The app functionality and production methods are the big news here.


IF they can deliver on it.

You know you're really doing something when you can make strangers hate you over the Internet. - Mauleed
Just remember folks. Panic. Panic all the time. It's the only way to survive, other than just being mindful, of course-but geez, that's so friggin' boring. - Aegis Grimm
Hallowed is the All Pie
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Made in gb
Ridin' on a Snotling Pump Wagon






I’m intrigued by the 3D Printing distribution model.

If I’ve read it right, rather than selling STL files to Lieutenant Public*, the models are to be produced by localised 3D Printing firms?

If that’s right, and whilst I suspect we’ll get a lot of hearsay and not a lot of solid info, I do wonder exactly how that will work.

My friend is an avid printer of things 3D, but his machine is quite slow. Certainly too slow to be done as a commercial thing. He is of course just a Bloke With A Hobby, so one suspects commercial 3D printers are necessarily faster, or higher capacity (where my friend can do one at a time, perhaps a commercial 3D printer can do multiple to a batch)

One assumes they’ll get paid per-model as a Slice O’ The Price, or will perhaps have to pay up front for the license, then hope they get enough orders to make their profit, potentially a hybrid of the two. Like a franchise type model.

Which begs the question from such a producer’s point of view, what things might be in place to avoid over saturating a given area?

Yes I am skeptical, but freely admit a solid chunk of that is coming from a position of ignorance I’m perfectly happy to educated away from

*previously known as General Public, but recently demoted due to repeated bouts of stupidity and wilful gross negligence.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 2022/07/26 20:05:44


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